WorldCat Identities

Ford, Gordon Lester 1823-1891

Overview
Works: 1,015 works in 1,040 publications in 2 languages and 1,077 library holdings
Genres: History  Juvenile works  Autographs  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Records and correspondence 
Roles: Former owner, Author, Recipient
Classifications: Z1215, 942.02
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Gordon Lester Ford
 
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Most widely held works by Gordon Lester Ford
The prompter, or, A commentary on common sayings and subjects : which are full of common sense, the best sense in the world by Noah Webster( Book )

1 edition published in 1799 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Letter from Noah Webster to George Washington : and from George Washington to Noah Webster : from the original in the possession of Gordon L. Ford by Noah Webster( Book )

1 edition published in 1881 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Noah Webster's letter is dated 14 July 1788. George Washington's reply is dated 31 July 1788
"Head Quarters Camp Etah",, to Colonel John Murray by Gerard Lake Lake( )

3 editions published in 1804 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Relating the defeat of the enemy by General Fraser at Deeg; informing him that he "succeeded in surprising their Camp under the walls of Furrukabad, in destroying great numbers of them, and in dispersing the remainder[.] Jaswunt Rao Holkar himself with such followers as he has been able to collect since that affair, has recrossed the Jumna and is flying in the greatest confusion and consternation. These events will render it unnecessary for you to advance farther than Kotah in which situation it may be possible for you to cut off such parties of the flying Enemy as may attempt to make their escape to the Dekkan. The Rajah of Kotah's disposition has I have reason to think been on all occasions pacific, on which account you are to treat him as a friend to the British Government, and endeavour by every means that circumstances will admit to conciliate his firm attachment and adherence;" acknowledging receipt of his most recent letter and expressing his pleasure to hear that he has sufficient supplies to maintain his position at Kotah "as long as may be necessary;" adding in a postscript signed with initials, "The Kotah Rajah has been written to, to attend your every assistance."
Bordeaux, to Colonel Macleod by Laurent Lafaurie de Monbadon( )

2 editions published in 1806 in French and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Being an English translation of MA 1268.40; acknowledging receipt of a letter from Monsieur Lacuée and forwarding letters he has sent for him and for Abbé Clisson; expressing his satisfaction that his office is able to help him
Paris, to Lafaurie Monbadon by Jean-Girard Lacuée( )

2 editions published in 1806 in French and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Being a copy and an English translation of MA 1268.36; concerning his desire to help secure the release of Colonel John Macleod
place not specified, to an unidentified man by John Scott Eldon( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Saying that he can't help with the recipient's request about a living because the living is "unknown to" him
Canterbury, to Sir James Pulteney by Thomas Bruce( )

2 editions published in 1797 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Informing him that the Dutch Fleet "is now at Sea;" requesting that he "inform the Commanding Officers of the Regiments in your District of this Circumstance, and to request that any officers going on leave of absence may defer their intentions for a short time in order to prevent the inconveniencing which might arise from their being immediately ordered to return to their Posts;" ordering that all furloughs be stopped until the situation is fully known
[London?], to Lady Bath by James Pulteney( )

2 editions published in 1794 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Asking for her approval to inform the Duke of York "as of the present state of affairs;" encouraging her to attend a masquerade ball that evening and use the ticket that the Duchess of Gordon had obtained for her as "A Lady's ticket takes a gentleman likewise, & in consideration of my Services upon this occasion I solicit the Honor of attending you."
"Head Quarters Camp", to Colonel Murray by Gerard Lake Lake( )

2 editions published in 1804 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Forwarding a dispatch from the Secretary of Government; informing him that "Jeswant Rao Holkar has advanced near to Agra and his Infantry and Pack of artillery are said to be a few marches in his rear. I am now on my march to oppose him; communicating in cipher following the text "the great advantages to be derived in the present state of affairs;" adding, that he hopes he will "make every possible exertion" with the rest of the text being in ciphers
Canterbury, to Sir James Pulteney by Thomas Bruce( )

2 editions published in 1797 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Informing him that Doctor Wardle, Inspecting Surgeon, will be coming to inspect his hospitals; asking him to "direct the Regimental Surgeons to give him such information as he may wish on the occasion - The Doctor is a great Friend of Sir Charles Greys, having been with him in the W. Indies..."
Cadiz, to Sir James [Pulteney] by Robert Arbuthnot( )

2 editions published in 1809 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reporting on the situation as he finds it in Cadiz; saying..."it is really impossible to shut ones Eyes to the prospect of speedy ruin which is hanging over this Country. I arrived here from Lisbon on Monday last & was not a little surprized to find that nobody had the smallest suspicion of the danger which threatens them. The Gazettes published by authority of the Supreme Junta of Seville were filled with accounts of Victories obtained over the French, & I daresay the first thing that will rouze(?) them from their Security will be the flight of the Junta from Seville & the approach of a French Army. No precautions have been taken to remove about fourteen thousand French Prisoners in this neighborhood or to secure the Naval Stores or the Arsenal or the Men of War from falling into the Hands of the Enemy. The English here complain strongly of our Ambassador at Seville Mr. Frere who gives them no information & takes no Steps to excite the Activity of the Spaniards, but employs all his time in reading Don Quixote instead of attending to this Business. Cadiz is very strong both from its situation & from Art, but the Garrison consists solely of Volunteers & the City Militia who altho fine looking fellows & I believe very hearty in the Cause, have no Military Experience & from their former Habits of Life are incapable of bearing fatigue. As they are all of them too, Men of Property in the town, it is not impossible that to save their Houses & families they might be prevailed upon to surrender it to the French without Resistance. The Supreme Junta has neither authority nor energy. Instead of taking active & vigourous measures to defend their Country they are occupied with the most frivolous objects, & employ their time in writing [illegible] Proclamations & Edicts against Free Masons & Illuminati. In short, I think the Cause of the Spanish Patriots is quite desperate & that in a very short time Bonaparte will be in possession of the whole Peninsula except Gibraltar;" adding that he will be go to Seville shortly and from there to Gibraltar "if not prevented by the approach of the French."
Dunbar, to Sir James Pulteney by Robert Douglas( )

2 editions published in 1804 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Expressing his concern and frustration with a recruiting policy for Non-Commissioned officers and the issues surrounding limited vs. unlimited service; concluding that he hopes he will agree with him "that an old Regiment like the 1st Batt. now nearly complete, is better capable of forming Non Commissioned Officers for itself than a young battalion circumstanced as I have described."
place not specified, to "the Commons of Great Britain in Parliament Assembled," by Adam Fergusson( )

2 editions published in 1780 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A petition to the House of Commons in which Fergusson contests the recent election results in Ayrshire and argues that he should be returned to Parliament instead of Major Hugh Montgomery because he had "the majority of legal votes."
to Sir James Pulteney( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of 56 letters primarily to Sir James Pulteney arranged alphabetically and including 30 letters from Sir Charles Grey, First Earl Grey
"Clifford Street" [London], to [Sir James Pulteney?] by Henry Addington Sidmouth( )

2 editions published in 1806 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Informing him that the "Information contained in a Letter which I wrote to you an Hour ago, of which was generally credited, proves to be without Foundation."
London, to [Sir James Pulteney] by Henry Dundas( )

2 editions published in 1793 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Informing him that the King had approved a pension for a woman who wished it to be in the names of her two children
Oosterhout, to Sir James Pulteney by Herbert Taylor( )

2 editions published in 1794 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reporting on the efforts to relieve Sluys and the French movement toward Liege; reporting that "The Duke is perfectly well, & in better Spirits than He has been for some time."
"New Inn" [London], to Sir James Pulteney by James & Abbott Jenkins( )

2 editions published in 1808 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sending a copy of a letter sent to Charles James from a Mr. Lloyd of Grays Inn concerning a petition by Lord Darlington
Colchester, to [Sir John] Murray by Thomas Carey( )

2 editions published in 1806 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discussing where men from the Ayrshire Militia who could not be accommodated in the Chelmsford Barracks are to be housed
 
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Alternative Names
Ford, Gordon L. (Gordon Lester), 1823-1891

Languages
English (43)

French (2)