WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:15:47 2014 UTClccn-nr920367790.00The Galphin claim : speech ... in the House of Representatives, Saturday, July 3d. and 5th., 1850 : on the report of the Select Committee upon the conduct of the Secretary of War in connection with the Galphin claim0.901.00The Galphin claim. Speech of Hon. James G. King, of New Jersey, in the House of Representatives, July 3d, and 5th, 1850. On the Report of the select committee upon the conduct of the Secretary of War in connection with the Galphin claim76182565nr 920367793262464Crawford, Geo. W. (George Washington), 1798-1872lccn-no95040062GeorgiaConvention of the People(1861 :Milledgeville and Savannah, Ga.)nc-georgia$constitutional convention$1861GeorgiaConstitutional Convention(1861)nc-georgia$convention of the people$1861$milledgeville ga and savannah gaGeorgiaConvention of the People(1861 :Milledgeville, Ga., and Savannah, Ga.)lccn-no96056901University of North Carolina at Chapel HillDocumenting the American South (Project)lccn-n80120860University of North Carolina at Chapel HillLibrarylccn-n79023113Georgialccn-n81136945Galphin, George-1780lccn-n86111411King, James G.(James Gore)1791-1853nc-united states$congress$house$select committee on the relation of the secretary of war to the galphin claimUnited StatesCongressHouseSelect Committee on the Relation of the Secretary of War to the Galphin Claimnc-united states$congress$house$select committee of investigation in relation to the claim of the representatives of george galphinUnited StatesCongressHouseSelect Committee of Investigation in Relation to the Claim of the Representatives of George GalphinCrawford, George Washington1798-1872ConstitutionsConstitutionSourcesRecords and correspondenceGeorgiaPolitical scienceSecessionConstitutionsUnited States--Confederate States of AmericaLegislationCrawford, George Washington,United StatesGalphin, George,American Revolution (1775-1783)Johnson, Reverdy,Clayton, John M.--(John Middleton),LegislatorsTaylor, Zachary,Preston, William Ballard,Ewing, Thomas,Meredith, William M.--(William Morris),Collamer, Jacob,Constitutional historyLouisianaBenton, Thomas Hart,GovernorsStephens, Alexander H.--(Alexander Hamilton),Constitutions--U.S. statesBanks and bankingConfederate States of America.--ArmyConstitutional conventionsClay, Henry,Taylor, Richard,Crawford, William Harris,Public worksNorth CarolinaCurrency questionGeorgia--Cherokee CountyJesup, Thomas Sidney,Georgia--WashingtonWhig Party (U.S.)Indians of North AmericaSouthwest, NewTravelGold mines and miningRiceTyler, John,Presidents--DeathYoung, Pierce Manning Butler,NewspapersFoote, Henry S.--(Henry Stuart),Crawford, John,Lumpkin, John H.--(John Henry),Taylor, Margaret Mackall Smith,1798187218301845184618491850185818611898190919501975197619993444051342.758Z12151558ocn002970692book18610.93GeorgiaJournal of the public and secret proceedings of the Convention of the people of Georgia : held in Milledgeville and Savannah in 1861 : together with the ordinances adoptedSources332ocn085888512file18610.90GeorgiaJournal of the public and secret proceedings of the Convention of the public of Georgia, held in Milledgeville and Savannah in 1861 together with the ordinances adopted321ocn042025440file19990.86GeorgiaJournal of the public and secret proceedings of the Convention of the People of Georgia held in Milledgeville and Savannah in 1861302ocn021092622book18610.96GeorgiaOrdinance of secession passed Jan'ry 19, 1861, with the names of the signers291ocn021092603book18610.88GeorgiaThe constitution of the state of GeorgiaConstitutionConstitutions172ocn002393647book18610.93GeorgiaJournal of the public and secret proceedings of the Convention of the people of Georgia21ocn079919724book18451.00GeorgiaMessage. Executive Department, Milledgeville, Nov. 4, 184511ocn016898365book18461.00MassachusettsMessage to the House of Representatives ... transmit[ting] ... certain papers purporting to be resolves of the state of Georgia in relation to recent action of the government of this Commonwealth11ocn079450013mix1.00Crawford, George WashingtonGeorge Washington Crawford papers11ocn145786655mix1861Crawford, George WashingtonLetter, dated Milledgeville, Georgia, signed by G. W. Crawford, President of the convention, to the Governor of Wisconsin, transmitting a copy of the Ordinance of Secession of Georgia from the Union11ocn858391074book18500.47Crawford, George WashingtonReport of the Secretary of War : communicating the report of Lieutenant J.H. Simpson of an expedition into the Navajo country in 1849...11ocn779381510book18491.00Parker, W. AW.A. Parker letter : Boston, Mass., to W.H. [sic, i.e. George Washington] Crawford, Washington, D.CRecords and correspondenceHandwritten letter intended for the current Secretary of War, George Washington Crawford but mistakenly addressed to a similarly named but deceased Secretary of War, William H. Crawford. Parker is writing to ask if a recently passed law authorizing supplying guns at the government's expense to people going to California applies to people who have already sailed. If so, he requests details on to how to apply for them, when they will be delivered, and what items will be received. Received at the War Department on March 14, 1869 and answered on March 1711ocn038476207mix18451.00Crawford, George WashingtonLetter to Charles Jones JenkinsThe collection consists of a letter from George W. Crawford to Charles Jones Jenkins dated February 15, 1845. In the letter, Crawford discusses the Whig party including its policies, beliefs, political theories, and future. Crawford also refutes charges leveled at the Whigs and himself11ocn166622732book18611.00GeorgiaJournal of the public and secret proceedings of the Convention of the people of Georgia, held in Milledgeville and Savannah in 1861. Together with the ordinances adopted. Published by order of the convention51ocn017368343book18501.00King, James GThe Galphin claim. Speech of Hon. James G. King, of New Jersey, in the House of Representatives, July 3d, and 5th, 1850. On the Report of the select committee upon the conduct of the Secretary of War in connection with the Galphin claimHistoryClaims51ocn017365311book18500.81Clarke, Charles EThe Galphin claim. Speech of Hon. C.E. Clarke, of New York, in the House of Representatives, Saturday, July 6, 1850, on the report and resolutions of the Select Committee in Relation to the Claim of the Representatives of George GalphinHistoryClaims31ocn017365208book18500.47Cartter, David KRemarks of Mr. Cartter, of Ohio, on the Galphin claim. Delivered in the House of Representatives, July 3, 1850HistoryClaims21ocn017365340book18501.00DemocratA graphic sketch of Galphinism and the Empire Club21ocn191908931visu18490.47D'Avignon, FrancisPresident Taylor and his cabinetHistoryPortraitsPrint showing President Taylor standing in front of his cabinet officers, seated from left, Reverdy Johnson, Attorney General, William M. Meredith, Secretary of the Treasury, William B. Preston, Secretary of the Navy, George W. Crawford, Secretary of War, Jacob Collamer, Postmaster General, Thomas Ewing, Secretary of the Interior, and John M. Clayton, Secretary of State11ocn288440197mix1.00Georgia Congressmen: correspondence - Lanman collectionBiographyRecords and correspondenceThe collection consists of a group of manuscripts containing biographical information on Georgia congressmen, both senators and representatives, assembled by Charles Lanman for his Dictionary of the United States Congress. The collection is made up of replies received by Lanman when he circularized all living past and present members of congress in the 1850s preparatory to issuing his book.The replies are mainly autobiographical and in the handwriting of the subject. The letters and manuscripts are from George Washington Crawford, Martin Jenkins Crawford, Nathaniel Greene Foster, Lucius Jeremiah Gartrell, Alfred Iverson, James Jackson, John William Jones, Thomas Graves Lawson, Peter Early Love, John H. Lumpkin, Charles Henry Prince, John William Henderson Underwood, Hiram Warner, C. P. Wellborn, Francis Willis, Augustus Romaldus Wright and Pierce Manning Butler Young. Other letters have been moved to their respective collections11ocn046687126mix1846GeorgiaCharles Day land grant and platThis collection consists of a deed granting Charles Day Lot 317, containing ninety-two acres of Cherokee County land. The land was granted by Georgia governor George W. Crawford. The plat survey and the original pendant seal are attached11ocn319073164mix19501.00Crawford family genealogyGenealogyThe collection consists of a typescript detailing the genealogy of the Crawford family. The emigrant ancestor was John Crawford (circa 1600-1676). Two of the prominent Georgia descendants are Wiliam Harris Crawford (1772-1834) and George Washington Crawford (1798-1872)11ocn038477942mix18301.00Torrance, William HLetter to George W. CrawfordHistoryThe collection consists of a letter from William H. Torrance, Milledgeville (Ga.) to George W. Crawford, Augusta (Ga.) dated February 15, 1830. Torrance discusses the arrest of Elijah H. Burritt of the Milledgeville Statesman and Patriot for possessing insurrectionary literature which was discovered by his partner John Polhill11ocn299946208visu18501.00The Clay statue. A model of a man. Designed by the goddess of libertyThe artist lionizes Kentucky senator Henry Clay, author of the Compromise of 1850, and slams his political foes and critics of the compromise, particularly those in the Taylor administration. A text in the lower margin reads: "A Fable--In the Reign of Zackery 1st the Goddess of Liberty Designed a Statue. a Model of a Man which she exhibited before the King, his Ministers, & the People. the Beauty of the Statue Elicited such shouts of Approbation from the People that the King's Ministers fired with Jealousy determined to Destroy it, but after many Ineffectual attempts were obliged to Desist amidst the Laughter of the Court & the People." The King is clearly President Taylor, who sits on a throne at the far left, in uniform and holding a sword instead of a scepter. A spittoon is on the floor before him, and a black court jester crouches beside the throne holding a copy of the newspaper the "Republic." A larger-than-life statue of Henry Clay, in armor and holding a shield inscribed "Compromise" and a sword, stands in the center of the scene. Clay's sword bears the words, "I fight for my Country! Traitors Beware." The statue towers over the figures that surround it, which include Taylor cabinet members Reverdy Johnson, George W. Crawford, and Thomas Ewing (on the right) and Secretary of State John M. Clayton (on the left). Crawford and Ewing regard the broken ax and saw which they hold in their hands. Crawford (to Johnson): "Look here Just see what a great Big Piece Ive Broke of my Gulpin Ax. I'll send in a Gulpin Claim for this. Valuable Ax this." The allusion is to Crawford's lucrative and questionable role as counsel for the Galphin family's successful suit against the federal government, an arrangement which provoked heated criticism in the press. The controversy over this Taylor administration scandal reached its peak in April, May and June of 1850. Johnson: "The Ax, was Broke before you used it, however, you Lie & I'll Swear to it, & we'll Pockett the Plunder between us." Ewing: "Why Ive Broke nearly all the teeth of my Chickensaw against this Infernall Statue. I'le send in a Big Claim for this." Clayton gestures entreatingly to Taylor: "Why the Devil dont your Imperial Majesty assist us, I can assure your Majesty, it's much Easier discharging a Bullitt, from a Republic, than it is injuring this Statue." Journalist Alexander C. Bullitt was a Taylor advisor and, beginning in 1849, editor of the administration organ the Washington "Republic." Bullitt appears here as the black court fool. Taylor hugs to his chest the tiny figure of New York senator William H. Seward, who sits on his lap. Seward was an insider in the short-lived Taylor administration, and a vigorous opponent of the Compromise of 1850. Taylor says, "Consider the weight of my Crown, Dear Clayton. besides my sick Baby, little Billey, requires, all my Care. moreove as the People like the Statue, I'de rather not Compromise myself, in the matter. assume the Responsibility Yourself, you'r used to it." Just to the right of the throne stand (left to right) senators Thomas Hart Benton, Daniel Webster, and Henry S. Foote. Benton: "Why its a Miserable Statue. a wretched abortion, the inscriptions on the Sword & Shield are in very Bad Taste, very Bad Taste indeed." Benton was an adamant critic of the Compromise. Foote (to Webster): "I think its a Splendid Statue. Which Party do you go for." Webster: "The Party thats likely to win. Of Course, I shall Keep one eye on the Statue, & the other on the Chair, & act according to circumstances." Senator Lewis Cass stands to the right of Foote, in the background, saying, "I rather like the Inscription on the Shield." Clay does, however, have some friends here. On the far right is a crowd of people led by the figure of Liberty, a young maiden in a classical gown holding a staff and liberty cap. She addresses Johnson and the others, "Gentlemen! I made this Statue as a Model of a Man. now though it is only of Clay & I wafted it here in a Breath, still with all your efforts, you can neither move it from its Base, or inflict the slightest Injury upon it. its innate strenght [sic] will defy all your Puny attempts." Liberty's followers enjoin, "Why I think it's a Beautifull Statue," and "So do I! Hurrah! for the Clay Statue." "The Clay Statue," though tentatively dated 1849 by Weitenkampf, must have appeared in 1850, certainly after Henry Clay's presentation of the compromise in January and probably as late as the spring, at the height of the Galphin controversy11ocn145749442art19090.10Herringshaw, Thomas WilliamCrawford, George Washington11ocn034738771book18501.00Houston, John WSpeech of Hon. J.W. Houston of Delaware in the House of Representatives, July 3, 1850 : on the Report and resolution of the Select Committee appointed to investigate the conduct and relations of Hon. George W. Crawford, Secretary of War, in regard to the claim of the representatives of George GalphinHistoryClaims11ocn829745782visu18501.00N. Currier (Firm)Death of Genl. Z. Taylor, 12th president of the United States, at the president's house, July 9th, 1850, 35 minutes past 10 o'clock p.m. his last words, "I am prepared - I have endeavoured to do my duty."Pictorial works11ocn070980221mix1.00Taylor, ZacharyZachary Taylor papersRecords and correspondenceCorrespondence, autobiographical account, military papers, estate papers, printed matter, map, and other papers. Subjects include Taylor's presidency, his service in the U.S. Army especially in the 2nd Seminole Indian War, and the management of Taylor's plantation, Fashion, Saint Charles Parish, Louisiana, by his son, Richard Taylor. Correspondents include John M. Clayton, George Washington Crawford, Jefferson Davis, Thomas Sidney Jesup, James K. Polk, Thomas W. Ringgold, and Winfield Scott11ocn830766473book19090.93GeorgiaJournal of the public and secret proceedings of the Convention of the people of Georgia : held in Milledgeville and Savannah in 1861 : together with the ordinances adoptedSources11ocn034519853book18501.00King, James GThe Galphin claim : Speech of Hon. James G. King of New Jersey in the House of Representatives, July 3, 1850 : on the Report and resolution of the select committee appointed to investigate the conduct and relations of Hon. George W. Crawford, Secretary of War, in regard to the claim of the representatives of George GalphinHistoryClaims11ocn038477000mix1.00Toombs, Robert AugustusRobert Toombs papersHistoryThe collection consists of correspondence of Robert Toombs from 1837-1880. Includes letters to his wife, Julia Ann Toombs in Washington, Wilkes County, Georgia, mainly while serving in the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C. which discuss family matters with some political matters mentioned (1850-1861) and during the Civil War while serving in Virginia (1862) and the Atlanta Campaign (1864). Of particular interest are several letters from Alexander Stephens to Mrs. Toombs discussing political and family matters. Also includes letters (1851-1879) to George Walker Crawford, and his son-in-law, Samuel W. Mays regarding lands owned by Toombs in Tarrant County, Texas11ocn022150846mix1.00Berrien, John MacPhersonJohn MacPherson Berrien papersIncludes legal papers relative to the Florida-Georgia boundary controversy, 1851-1856; financial papers of a rice plantation and farm near Savannah and Clarksville, Ga., respectively; and correspondence (1830-1852) with men prominent in the Jackson administration and in Georgia politics. Also includes papers (1778-1786) relating to the military service during the Revolution of Berrien's father, John Berrien; Civil War letters from Robert Falligant in Virginia and Phil Falligant in Georgia; letter books; a receipt book; and a ledger. Correspondents include John Quincy Adams, George Edmund Badger, Thomas Hart Benton, Francis Preston Blair, Henry Clay, Howell Cobb, George W. Crawford, Hamilton Fish, Richard W. Habersham, James Hamilton, Jr., S. D. Ingram, Andrew Jackson, Alexander H. Stephens, George M. Troup, John Tyler, Daniel Webster, Thurlow Weed, and Richard Henry Wilde11ocn078578618book1850King, James GThe Galphin claim : speech ... in the House of Representatives, Saturday, July 3d. and 5th., 1850 : on the report of the Select Committee upon the conduct of the Secretary of War in connection with the Galphin claim11ocn057039695visu1.00[George Washington Crawford, half-length portrait, three-quarters to the left]Whig Congressman from Georgia, 1843; Governor of Georgia 1843-1847; U.S. Secretary of War, 1849-1850Fri Mar 21 15:36:16 EDT 2014batch26451