WorldCat Identities

Volkoff, Alexandre

Overview
Works: 64 works in 112 publications in 3 languages and 2,874 library holdings
Genres: Internet videos  Drama  Silent films  Film adaptations  Sports films  Children's films  Nonfiction television programs  Sports television programs  Film serials  Television series 
Roles: Director, Author, Scenarist, Actor, Performer, Author of screenplay, Adapter
Classifications: PN1997, E
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Alexandre Volkoff
The House of Mystery by Aleksandr Volkov( Visual )

9 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in 3 languages and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Julien Villandrit owns a textile factory, whose manager, Henri Corrandi is his childhood friend. Both love the same woman, Regine of Bettigny, who gives her hand to Villandrit. Mad with jealousy, Corradin uses all means to break up the couple. He doesn't hesitate to hurt Regine by sending Julien to prison for a crime he did not commit. But despite a long and painful separation, Julien and Regine remain strong in their love. Based on the novel of Jules Mary, this film is composed of ten episodes: 1. L'Ami felon (The Treacherous Friend) 2. Le Secret de l'etang (The Secret of the Pond) 3. L'Ambition au service de la haine (Ambition in Service of Hate) 4. L'Implacable verdict (The Implacable Verdict.) 5. Le Pont vivant (The Human Bridge) 6. La Voix du sang (The Voice of Blood) 7. Les Caprices du destin (The Whims of Fate) 8. En Champ clos (No Way Out) 9. L'Angoisse de Corradin (The Anxieties of Corradin) 10. Le triomphe de l'amour (The Triumph of Love)
Kean( Visual )

4 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in French and English and held by 149 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ivan Mosjoukine collaborated on the script and plays the title role in Alexandre Volkoff's lavish Kean (1924), dramatizing the later life of Edmund Kean, the greatest Shakespearian of the early 19th century
The Secret of the Pond( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 2 of The House of Mystery - Le Secret de l'etang (The Secret of the Pond)
No Way Out( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 8 of The House of Mystery - En Champ clos (No Way Out)
Ambition in the Service of Hate( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 3 of The House of Mystery - L'Ambition au service de la haine (Ambition in Service of Hate)
The Human Bridge by Yuan Gu( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 5 of The House of Mystery - Le Pont vivant (The Human Bridge)
The Treacherous Friend( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 1 of The House of Mystery - L'Ami felon (The Treacherous Friend)
The Anxieties of Corradin( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 9 of The House of Mystery - L'Angoisse de Corradin (The Anxieties of Corradin)
The Voice of the Blood( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 6 of The House of Mystery - La Voix du sang (The Voice of Blood)
The Whims of Fate( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in French and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 7 of The House of Mystery - Les Caprices du destin (The Whims of Fate)
The Implacable Verdict( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in French and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 4 of The House of Mystery - L'Implacable verdict (The Implacable Verdict)
The Triumph of Love by Charles E Brown( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in French and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter 10 of The House of Mystery - Le triomphe de l'amour (The Triumph of Love)
Kean, ou désorde & génie( Visual )

5 editions published between 1995 and 2013 in 3 languages and held by 97 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ivan Mosjoukine also collaborated on the script and plays the title role in Alexandre Volkoff's lavish Kean (1924), dramatizing the later life of Edmund Kean, the greatest Shakespearian of the early 19th century
La maison du mystère( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial films, or ciné romans were well-established in France before World War I, where they are most closely identified with writer-director Louis Feuillade. These melodramas for adult audiences were unlike American serials that were targeted primarily at youngsters. At Albatros, Russian émigré producer Joseph Ermolieff produced three serials in 1921, all adapted from roman-feuilletons by the phenomenally successful Jules Mary, a specialist in the genre, who penned many a famous melodrama around the theme of the miscarriage of justice - a theme that must have had special appeal for the unjustly displaced technicians and artists of Ermolieff's Moscow and Yalta studios. The first two serials have not left a trace in the annals of film archives. But The House of Mystery (La Maison du mystère), Ermolieff's third serial, (begun in the summer of 1921 and not completed until 1923) by Alexandre Volkoff (with fellow studio director Viatcheslav Tourjansky providing some important and uncredited second-unit work), is a triumph of the genre and a complete delight that not only survived, but also was restored in its original ten-episode format by the Cinémathèque française. The involved plot of La Maison du mystère centers around Julien Villandrit (Ivan Mosjoukine) and his star-crossed courtship to Régine de Bettigny (Hélène Darly), that inspires bitterness and jealousy in Henri Corradin (Charles Vanel), Julien's long-time associate and secret rival in love. For Mosjoukine, who contracted typhoid fever during the course of production, it remains one of the ultimate consecrations to his multifarious talents as actor, writer, and even make-up artist. But the film also opened doors for Vanel (Les Misérables, The Wages of Fear, Diabolique), who gives the "Curses! Foiled again!" school of melodramatic villainy a new lease on life, and the astonishing Nicolas Koline
Early Russian Cinema( Visual )

1 edition published in 1991 in Russian and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Traditional accounts of Soviet cinema have always stressed its difference from the Russian cinema of the Tsarist period, implying in the process that this earlier phase was actively hostile to social change. Not so, as we begin to realize from the tantalizing fragments that have survived. Indeed commercial producers were keen, as ever, to exploit topicality; and the eight months between 1917's two revolutions of February and October saw a remarkable upsurge of 'revolutionary' sentiment. The Revolutionary, released in April, actually provides a link into the post-October period, since its writer and star, Ivan Perestiani, went on to direct one of the few genuinely popular early Soviet classics, Red Imps, in 1923. In 1917, the journal Teatr noted sardonically: The film studios have come up with a number of pictures tailored to 'the moment.' They have paid their dues to society though they have taken their cut too. The Revolutionary and The Provocateur were produced hastily in two or three days and are distinguished neither by their plots nor by any originality in their production.#x9D; It went on to record, however, that The Revolutionary 'is a vivid example of agitational cinema, and that it drew applause when shown. For Luck also marked a transition: a tragically early end to the career of Bauer, who died after an injury sustained while on location in the Crimea for this film; and an early appearance by the future pioneer of Soviet montage, Lev Kuleshov. Kuleshov was already working as an art director with Bauer, when he was asked also to play the part of Lee's hopeless young suitor. The central scheme of the film - a daughter and mother both in love with the same man â€" and the extraordinary intensity brought to the final scenes, in which the daughter's psychological blindness becomes physical when she is rejected, show Bauer at the height of his subtle powers. Behind the Screen is no more than a fragment of the major two-part film, A Life Destroyed by Pitiless Fate, released in November 1917, by which time most of the personnel involved in it would have already moved south on their way into emigration. Its film studio setting, therefore, has a coincidental poignancy, a farewell to the Russian cinema by two of its greatest stars, Mozzhukhin and Lisenko
Maison du mystère( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial films, or ciné romans were well-established in France before World War I, where they are most closely identified with writer-director Louis Feuillade. These melodramas for adult audiences were unlike American serials that were targeted primarily at youngsters. At Albatros, Russian émigré producer Joseph Ermolieff produced three serials in 1921, all adapted from roman-feuilletons by the phenomenally successful Jules Mary, a specialist in the genre, who penned many a famous melodrama around the theme of the miscarriage of justice - a theme that must have had special appeal for the unjustly displaced technicians and artists of Ermolieff's Moscow and Yalta studios. The first two serials have not left a trace in the annals of film archives. But The House of Mystery (La Maison du mystère), Ermolieff's third serial, (begun in the summer of 1921 and not completed until 1923) by Alexandre Volkoff (with fellow studio director Viatcheslav Tourjansky providing some important and uncredited second-unit work), is a triumph of the genre and a complete delight that not only survived, but also was restored in its original ten-episode format by the Cinematheque Francaise. Flicker Alley and the Blackhawk Films Collection are proud to present for the first time on DVD this six-and-a-half-hour epic of stylish elegance and narrative imagination, with optional English subtitles by Lenny Borger and a brand-new score by composer Neil Brand. The involved plot of La Maison du mystère centers around Julien Villandrit (Ivan Mosjoukine) and his star-crossed courtship to Régine de Bettigny (Hélène Darly), that inspires bitterness and jealousy in Henri Corradin (Charles Vanel), Julien's long-time associate and secret rival in love. For Mosjoukine, who contracted typhoid fever during the course of production, it remains one of the ultimate consecrations to his multifarious talents as actor, writer, and even make-up artist. But the film also opened doors for Vanel (Les Misérables, The Wages of Fear, Diabolique) who gives the "Curses! Foiled again!" school of melodramatic villainy a new lease on life, and the astonishing Nicolas Koline
Maison du mystère( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial films, or ciné romans were well-established in France before World War I, where they are most closely identified with writer-director Louis Feuillade. These melodramas for adult audiences were unlike American serials that were targeted primarily at youngsters. At Albatros, Russian émigré producer Joseph Ermolieff produced three serials in 1921, all adapted from roman-feuilletons by the phenomenally successful Jules Mary, a specialist in the genre, who penned many a famous melodrama around the theme of the miscarriage of justice - a theme that must have had special appeal for the unjustly displaced technicians and artists of Ermolieff's Moscow and Yalta studios. The first two serials have not left a trace in the annals of film archives. But The House of Mystery (La Maison du mystère), Ermolieff's third serial, (begun in the summer of 1921 and not completed until 1923) by Alexandre Volkoff (with fellow studio director Viatcheslav Tourjansky providing some important and uncredited second-unit work), is a triumph of the genre and a complete delight that not only survived, but also was restored in its original ten-episode format by the Cinematheque Francaise. Flicker Alley and the Blackhawk Films Collection are proud to present for the first time this six-and-a-half-hour epic of stylish elegance and narrative imagination, with optional English subtitles by Lenny Borger and a brand-new score by composer Neil Brand. The involved plot of La Maison du mystère centers around Julien Villandrit (Ivan Mosjoukine) and his star-crossed courtship to Régine de Bettigny (Hélène Darly), that inspires bitterness and jealousy in Henri Corradin (Charles Vanel), Julien's long-time associate and secret rival in love. For Mosjoukine, who contracted typhoid fever during the course of production, it remains one of the ultimate consecrations to his multifarious talents as actor, writer, and even make-up artist. But the film also opened doors for Vanel (Les Misérables, The Wages of Fear, Diabolique) who gives the "Curses! Foiled again!" school of melodramatic villainy a new lease on life, and the astonishing Nicolas Koline
Maison du mystère( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial films, or ciné romans were well-established in France before World War I, where they are most closely identified with writer-director Louis Feuillade. These melodramas for adult audiences were unlike American serials that were targeted primarily at youngsters. At Albatros, Russian émigré producer Joseph Ermolieff produced three serials in 1921, all adapted from roman-feuilletons by the phenomenally successful Jules Mary, a specialist in the genre, who penned many a famous melodrama around the theme of the miscarriage of justice - a theme that must have had special appeal for the unjustly displaced technicians and artists of Ermolieff's Moscow and Yalta studios. The first two serials have not left a trace in the annals of film archives. But The House of Mystery (La Maison du mystère), Ermolieff's third serial, (begun in the summer of 1921 and not completed until 1923) by Alexandre Volkoff (with fellow studio director Viatcheslav Tourjansky providing some important and uncredited second-unit work), is a triumph of the genre and a complete delight that not only survived, but also was restored in its original ten-episode format by the Cinematheque Francaise. Flicker Alley and the Blackhawk Films Collection are proud to present for the first time on DVD this six-and-a-half-hour epic of stylish elegance and narrative imagination, with optional English subtitles by Lenny Borger and a brand-new score by composer Neil Brand. The involved plot of La Maison du mystère centers around Julien Villandrit (Ivan Mosjoukine) and his star-crossed courtship to Régine de Bettigny (Hélène Darly), that inspires bitterness and jealousy in Henri Corradin (Charles Vanel), Julien's long-time associate and secret rival in love. For Mosjoukine, who contracted typhoid fever during the course of production, it remains one of the ultimate consecrations to his multifarious talents as actor, writer, and even make-up artist. But the film also opened doors for Vanel (Les Misérables, The Wages of Fear, Diabolique) who gives the "Curses! Foiled again!" school of melodramatic villainy a new lease on life, and the astonishing Nicolas Koline
Maison du mystère( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial films, or ciné romans were well-established in France before World War I, where they are most closely identified with writer-director Louis Feuillade. These melodramas for adult audiences were unlike American serials that were targeted primarily at youngsters. At Albatros, Russian émigré producer Joseph Ermolieff produced three serials in 1921, all adapted from roman-feuilletons by the phenomenally successful Jules Mary, a specialist in the genre, who penned many a famous melodrama around the theme of the miscarriage of justice - a theme that must have had special appeal for the unjustly displaced technicians and artists of Ermolieff's Moscow and Yalta studios. The first two serials have not left a trace in the annals of film archives. But The House of Mystery (La Maison du mystère), Ermolieff's third serial, (begun in the summer of 1921 and not completed until 1923) by Alexandre Volkoff (with fellow studio director Viatcheslav Tourjansky providing some important and uncredited second-unit work), is a triumph of the genre and a complete delight that not only survived, but also was restored in its original ten-episode format by the Cinematheque Francaise. Flicker Alley and the Blackhawk Films Collection are proud to present for the first time on DVD this six-and-a-half-hour epic of stylish elegance and narrative imagination, with optional English subtitles by Lenny Borger and a brand-new score by composer Neil Brand. The involved plot of La Maison du mystère centers around Julien Villandrit (Ivan Mosjoukine) and his star-crossed courtship to Régine de Bettigny (Hélène Darly), that inspires bitterness and jealousy in Henri Corradin (Charles Vanel), Julien's long-time associate and secret rival in love. For Mosjoukine, who contracted typhoid fever during the course of production, it remains one of the ultimate consecrations to his multifarious talents as actor, writer, and even make-up artist. But the film also opened doors for Vanel (Les Misérables, The Wages of Fear, Diabolique) who gives the "Curses! Foiled again!" school of melodramatic villainy a new lease on life, and the astonishing Nicolas Koline
Maison du mystère( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial films, or ciné romans were well-established in France before World War I, where they are most closely identified with writer-director Louis Feuillade. These melodramas for adult audiences were unlike American serials that were targeted primarily at youngsters. At Albatros, Russian émigré producer Joseph Ermolieff produced three serials in 1921, all adapted from roman-feuilletons by the phenomenally successful Jules Mary, a specialist in the genre, who penned many a famous melodrama around the theme of the miscarriage of justice - a theme that must have had special appeal for the unjustly displaced technicians and artists of Ermolieff's Moscow and Yalta studios. The first two serials have not left a trace in the annals of film archives. But The House of Mystery (La Maison du mystère), Ermolieff's third serial, (begun in the summer of 1921 and not completed until 1923) by Alexandre Volkoff (with fellow studio director Viatcheslav Tourjansky providing some important and uncredited second-unit work), is a triumph of the genre and a complete delight that not only survived, but also was restored in its original ten-episode format by the Cinematheque Francaise. Flicker Alley and the Blackhawk Films Collection are proud to present for the first time this six-and-a-half-hour epic of stylish elegance and narrative imagination, with optional English subtitles by Lenny Borger and a brand-new score by composer Neil Brand. The involved plot of La Maison du mystère centers around Julien Villandrit (Ivan Mosjoukine) and his star-crossed courtship to Régine de Bettigny (Hélène Darly), that inspires bitterness and jealousy in Henri Corradin (Charles Vanel), Julien's long-time associate and secret rival in love. For Mosjoukine, who contracted typhoid fever during the course of production, it remains one of the ultimate consecrations to his multifarious talents as actor, writer, and even make-up artist. But the film also opened doors for Vanel (Les Misérables, The Wages of Fear, Diabolique) who gives the "Curses! Foiled again!" school of melodramatic villainy a new lease on life, and the astonishing Nicolas Koline
 
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Alternative Names
Aleksandar Volkov

Alexander Alexandrowitsch Wolkow russischer Filmregisseur, Drehbuchautor und Darsteller

Alexandre Volkoff

Alexandre Volkoff acteur uit Keizerrijk Rusland (1885-1942)

Alexandre Volkoff Russian actor and film director

Volkoff, A. 1885-1942

Volkoff, A. (Alexandre), 1885-1942

Volkoff, Aleksandr

Volkoff Aleksandr 1885-1942

Volkoff, Alexandre

Volkoff, Alexandre 1885-1942

Volkov, A. A.

Volkov, Aleksandr

Volkov, Aleksandr 1885-1942

Volkov, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich

Volkov, Alexander

Volkov, Alexander 1885-1942

Volkov, Alexandr

Volkov, Alexandre

Wolkoff, Alessandro

Wolkoff, Alexander

Wolkoff, Alexander 1885-1942

Wołkow, Aleksander

Александр Александрович Волков

Вoлкοв Александр 1885-1942

Волков, А. А.

Волков, Александр Александрович 1885-1942

Волков Олександр Олександрович

アレクサンドル・ヴォルコフ

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