WorldCat Identities

Stana, Richard M.

Overview
Works: 118 works in 190 publications in 1 language and 16,614 library holdings
Genres: Identification guides  Rules 
Roles: Author
Classifications: KF306, 363.25968
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Richard M Stana
Follow-up information on the operations of the Department of Justice's Office of Professional Responsibility by Richard M Stana( Book )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A GAO report which provides information on the Dept. of Justice's Office of Professional Responsibility, written in reponse to concerns about the professionalism and conduct of some Department of Justice attorneys, and the process of holding them accountable to ethical standards
Investigations of terrorist financing, money laundering, and other financial crimes by Richard M Stana( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Secure Border Initiative : observations on selected aspects of SBInet program implementation : testimony before the Subcommittees on Management, Investigations, and Oversight, and Border, Maritime and Global Counterterrorism, Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives by Richard M Stana( Book )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In November 2005, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) established the Secure Border Initiative (SBI), a multiyear, multibillion dollar program to secure U.S. borders. One element of SBI is SBInet--the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) program responsible for developing a comprehensive border protection system through a mix of security infrastructure (e.g., fencing), and surveillance and communication technologies (e.g., radars, sensors, cameras, and satellite phones). The House Committee on Homeland Security asked GAO to monitor DHS progress in implementing the SBInet program. This testimony provides GAO's observations on (1) SBInet technology implementation; (2) SBInet infrastructure implementation; (3) the extent to which CBP has determined the impact of SBInet technology and infrastructure on its workforce needs and operating procedures; and (4) how the CBP SBI Program Management Office (PMO) has defined its human capital goals and the progress it has made to achieve these goals. GAO's observations are based on analysis of DHS documentation, such as program schedules, contracts, status, and reports. GAO also conducted interviews with DHS officials and contractors, and visits to sites in the southwest border where SBInet deployment is underway. GAO performed the work from April 2007 through October 2007. DHS generally agreed with GAO's findings. DHS has made some progress to implement Project 28--the first segment of SBInet technology across the southwest border, but it has fallen behind its planned schedule. The SBInet contractor delivered the components (i.e., radars, sensors and cameras) to the Project 28 site in Tucson, Arizona on schedule. However, Project 28 is incomplete more than 4 months after it was to become operational--at which point Border Patrol agents were to begin using SBInet technology to support their activities. According to DHS, the delays are primarily due to software integration problems. In September 2007, DHS officials said that the Project 28 contractor was making progress in correcting the problems, but DHS was unable to specify a date when the system would be operational. Due to the slippage in completing Project 28, DHS is revising the SBInet implementation schedule for follow-on technology projects, but still plans to deploy technology along 387 miles of the southwest border by December 31, 2008. DHS is also taking steps to strengthen its contract management for Project 28. SBInet infrastructure deployment along the southwest border is on schedule, but meeting CBP's goal to have 370 miles of pedestrian fence and 200 miles of vehicle barriers in place by December 31, 2008, may be challenging and more costly than planned. CBP met its intermediate goal to deploy 70 miles of new fencing in fiscal year 2007 and the average cost per mile was $2.9 million. The SBInet PMO estimates that deployment costs for remaining fencing will be similar to those thus far. In the past, DHS has minimized infrastructure construction labor costs by using Border Patrol agents and Department of Defense military personnel. However, CBP officials report that they plan to use commercial labor for future fencing projects. The additional cost of commercial labor and potential unforeseen increases in contract costs suggest future deployment could be more costly than planned. DHS officials also reported other challenging factors they will continue to face for infrastructure deployment, including community resistance, environmental considerations, and difficulties in acquiring rights to land along the border. The impact of SBInet on CBP's workforce needs and operating procedures remains unclear because the SBInet technology is not fully identified or deployed. CBP officials expect the number of Border Patrol agents required to meet mission needs to change from current projections, but until the system is fully deployed, the direction and magnitude of the change is unknown. For the Tucson sector, where Project 28 is being deployed, Border Patrol officials are developing a plan on how to integrate SBInet into their operating procedures. The SBI PMO tripled in size during fiscal year 2007, but fell short of its staffing goal of 270 employees. Agency officials expressed concerns that staffing shortfalls could affect the agency's capacity to provide adequate contractor oversight. In addition, the SBInet PMO has not yet completed long-term human capital planning
Homeland security : information on training new Border Patrol agents by Richard M Stana( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigration enforcement : benefits and limitations to using earnings data to identify unauthorized work by Barbara D Bovbjerg( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Observations on implementing the Western HemisphereTravel Initiative by Richard M Stana( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Secure Border Initiative fiscal year 2008 expenditure plan shows improvement, but deficiencies limit congressional oversight and DHS accountability by Richard M Stana( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. Customs and Border Protection's border security fencing, infrastructure and technology fiscal year 2011 expenditure plan by Richard M Stana( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigration benefits : actions needed to address vulnerabilities in process for granting permanent residency : report to the Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives by United States( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since September 11, 2001, a concern has been that terrorists or their supporters would seek to immigrate to the United States (I.e., seek lawful permanent residency (LPR)). The Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) conducts background checks and the FBI conducts name checks for those applying for LPR. GAO was asked to review USCIS's processes for screening individuals applying for LPR. GAO assessed: (1) what available data show about the extent to which national security concerns were discovered during USCIS background checks for LPR applications, (2) what issues USCIS has encountered in its background check processes and what actions have been taken to resolve those issues, and (3) the extent to which USCIS has addressed fraud vulnerabilities in its adjudication procedures for LPR. To conduct this work, GAO analyzed USCIS background check and adjudication procedures, USCIS data on adjudications, and its assessments of fraud in applications for LPR, and interviewed USCIS and FBI officials. GAO recommends that the Director of USCIS (1) establish timetables for addressing findings from its four benefit fraud assessments, and (2) establish requirements in LPR adjudications procedures on what evidence petitioner should be verified
Border patrol : checkpoints contribute to Border Patrol's mission, but more consistent data collection and performance measurement could improve effectiveness : report to congressional requesters by United States( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Border Patrol, part of the Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection (CBP), operates checkpoints on U.S. roads, mainly in the southwest border states where most illegal entries occur. As part of a three-tiered strategy to maximize detection and apprehension of illegal aliens, Border Patrol agents at checkpoints screen vehicles for illegal aliens and contraband. GAO was asked to assess (1) checkpoint performance and factors affecting performance, (2) checkpoint performance measures, (3) community impacts considered in checkpoint placement and design, and (4) the impact of checkpoint operations on nearby communities. GAO work included a review of Border Patrol data and guidance; visits to checkpoints and communities in five Border Patrol sectors across four southwest border states, selected on the basis of size, type, and volume, among other factors; and discussions with community members and Border Patrol officials in headquarters and field locations. GAO recommends that CBP take several actions to strengthen checkpoint design and staffing, and improve the measurement and reporting of checkpoint effectiveness, including community impact
Border security : additional actions needed to better ensure a coordinated federal response to illegal activity on federal lands : report to congressional requesters by United States( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Federal and tribal lands on the U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico are vulnerable to illegal cross-border activity. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), through its U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Office of Border Patrol (Border Patrol), is responsible for securing these lands, while the Departments of the Interior (DOI) and Agriculture (USDA) manage natural resources and protect the public. GAO was asked to examine the extent that (1) border security threats have changed on federal lands; (2) federal agencies operating on these lands have shared threat information and communications; and (3) federal agencies have coordinated budgets, resources, and strategies. GAO reviewed interagency agreements and threat assessments; analyzed enforcement data from 2007 through 2009; and interviewed officials at headquarters and two Border Patrol sectors selected due to high volume of illegal cross-border activity (Tucson) and limited ability to detect this activity (Spokane). GAO's observations cannot be generalized to all sectors but provide insights. This is a public version of a sensitive report that GAO issued in October 2010. Information that DHS deemed sensitive has been redacted. GAO is recommending that DOI and USDA determine if more guidance is needed for federal land closures, and that DHS, DOI, and USDA further implement interagency agreements. DHS, DOI, and USDA concurred with the recommendations
Secure Border Initiative fence construction costs by United States( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, required DHS to complete construction by December 31, 2008, of either 370 miles or other mileage determined by the Secretary, of reinforced fencing along the southwest border wherever the Secretary determines it would be most practical and effective in deterring smugglers and aliens attempting illegal entry. As directed by the Explanatory Statement accompanying the fiscal year 2008 Consolidated Appropriations Act, we examined the costs of constructing fencing along the southern border of the United States. This report addresses the following questions: 1) What were the construction costs of primary pedestrian and vehicle fencing miles completed under the SBI program as of September 30, 2007, and October 31, 2008? 2) What were the construction costs of secondary pedestrian fencing completed along existing primary fencing as of October 31, 2008? 3) If appropriated SBI funds from fiscal years 2007 and 2008 that were allocated for SBInet had been used to construct fencing, how many additional miles of pedestrian or vehicle fencing could have been constructed?
Secure Border Initiative : technology deployment delays persist and the impact of border fencing has not been assessed : report to congressional requesters by United States( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Securing the nation's borders from illegal entry of aliens and contraband, including terrorists and weapons of mass destruction, continues to be a major challenge. In November 2005, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the launch of the Secure Border Initiative (SBI), a multiyear, multibillion dollar program aimed at securing U.S. borders and reducing illegal immigration. Within DHS, U.S. Custom and Border Protection's (CBP) SBI program is responsible for developing a comprehensive border protection system using technology, known as SBInet, and tactical infrastructure -- fencing, roads, and lighting. GAO was asked to provide periodic updates on the status of the program. This report addresses (1) the extent to which CBP has implemented SBInet and the impact of delays that have occurred, and (2) the extent to which CBP has deployed tactical infrastructure and assessed its results. To do this work, GAO reviewed program schedules, status reports, and previous GAO work; interviewed DHS and CBP officials, among others; and visited three SBI sites where initial technology or fencing had been deployed at the time of GAO's review. GAO recommends that the Commissioner of CBP conduct a cost-effective evaluation of the impact of the tactical infrastructure's contribution to border security. DHS agreed with this recommendation
Moving illegal proceeds : challenges exist in the federal government's effort to stem cross-border currency smuggling : report to congressional requesters by United States( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the lead federal agency responsible for inspecting travelers who seek to smuggle large volumes of cash, called bulk cash, when leaving the country through land ports of entry. It is estimated that criminals smuggle $18 billion to $39 billion a year in bulk cash across the southwest border. The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) is responsible for reducing the risk of cross-border smuggling of funds through the use of devices called stored value, such as prepaid cards. GAO was asked to examine (1) the extent of actions taken by CBP to stem the flow of bulk cash leaving the country and any challenges that remain, (2) the regulatory gaps, if any, of cross-border reporting and other anti-money laundering requirements of stored value, and (3) if gaps exist, the extent to which FinCEN has addressed them. To conduct its work, GAO observed outbound operations at five land ports of entry. GAO also reviewed statutes, rules, and other information for stored value. This is a public version of a law enforcement sensitive report that GAO issued in September 2010. Information CBP deemed sensitive has been redacted. GAO recommends that CBP, among other things, gather data on program costs and benefits and that FinCEN develop a plan, including target dates, to better manage its rulemaking process
Military naturalizations : USCIS generally met mandated processing deadlines, but processing applicants deployed overseas Is a challenge : report to congressional committees by United States( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From September 2001 to March 2009, approximately 47,000 noncitizen members of the U.S. military became naturalized U.S. citizens. The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) and the Department of Defense (DOD) have taken steps to assist noncitizens with applying for naturalization. The Kendell Frederick Citizenship Assistance Act (Kendell Frederick Act) and the Military Personnel Citizenship Processing Act (MPCPA), enacted in 2008 to expedite application processing, each directed GAO to report on implementation of the acts. This report addresses (1) the extent to which USCIS met the processing deadlines established in the acts and (2) actions USCIS has taken to expedite the processing of applications, and any challenges it has faced. GAO reviewed relevant legislation and DHS reports and guidance related to processing applications; reviewed several generalizable samples of applicants' case files (A-files); and interviewed USCIS officials. GAO recommends that the USCIS Director ensure that available deployment information is collected from all applicants when they file the application; case files document that applicants were notified of processing delays and provided an estimated adjudication date; and case files document actions taken when a case is administratively closed or denied. DHS concurred with GAOs recommendations
U.S. Customs and Border Protection's border security fencing, infrastructure and technology fiscal year 2010 expenditure plan by Richard M Stana( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In November 2005, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the launch of the Secure Border Initiative (SBI), a multiyear, multibillion-dollar program aimed at securing U.S. borders and reducing illegal immigration. The expenditure plan did not fully satisfy all of the legislative conditions and committee reports' directions. Specifically, of the 11 legislative conditions, the expenditure plan satisfied 4, partially satisfied 6, and did not satisfy 1. Also, of the 7 committee reports' directions, the expenditure plan satisfied 2 and partially satisfied 5. Based on the results of our review, we are not making any recommendations for congressional consideration or agency action. We provided a draft of this report to DHS for review and comment. In commenting on a draft of this report, DHS responded to the findings related to 1 of the 11 legislative conditions and did not comment on the findings related to the 7 committee reports' directions. Specifically, DHS stated that it concurred in part with our assessment of partially satisfied for legislative condition 8. This condition requires that the expenditure plan include a certification by the DHS Chief Procurement Office (CPO) that the program (1) complies with DHS's acquisition management review process, among other things; (2) meets federal acquisition requirements; and (3) is adequately staffed. The condition also requires that the plan includes required supporting documentation used to obtain this certification
Information on certain illegal aliens arrested in the United States : briefing for Congressional Requesters, April 2005 by Richard M Stana( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arizona border surveillance technology : more information on plans and costs is needed before proceeding : report to congressional committees by United States( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In recent years, nearly half of all annual apprehensions of illegal aliens along the entire Southwest border with Mexico have occurred along the Arizona border. Keeping illegal flows of people and drugs under control remains a top priority for the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). In 2005, the Secure Border Initiative Network (SBInet) was conceived as a surveillance technology to create a "virtual fence" along the border. After spending nearly $1 billion, DHS deployed SBInet systems along 53 miles of Arizona's border that represent the highest risk for illegal entry. In January 2011, in response to concerns regarding SBInet's performance, cost, and schedule, DHS cancelled future procurements. CBP developed the Arizona Border Surveillance Technology Plan (Plan) for the remainder of the Arizona border. Funding for this Plan for fiscal year 2012 is $242 million. GAO was requested to assess the extent to which CBP (1) has the information needed to support and implement the Plan and (2) estimated life-cycle costs for future investments in accordance with best practices. GAO analyzed Plan documents and cost estimates, compared those estimates with best practices, and interviewed CBP officials. GAO recommends that CBP document the analysis justifying the technologies proposed in the Plan, determine its mission benefits, conduct a post-implementation review of SBInet and determine a more robust life-cycle cost estimate for the Plan. DHS concurred with the recommendations
Border security : enhanced DHS oversight and assessment of interagency coordination is needed for the northern border : report to congressional requesters by United States( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The challenges of securing the U.S.-Canadian border involve the coordination of multiple partners. The results of the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) efforts to integrate border security among its components and across federal, state, local, tribal, and Canadian partners are unclear. GAO was asked to address the extent to which DHS has (1) improved coordination with state, local, tribal, and Canadian partners; (2) progressed in addressing past federal coordination challenges; and (3) progressed in securing the northern border and used coordination efforts to address existing vulnerabilities. GAO reviewed interagency agreements, strategies, and operational documents that address DHS's reported northern border vulnerabilities such as terrorism. GAO visited four Border Patrol sectors, selected based on threat, and interviewed officials from federal, state, local, tribal, and Canadian agencies operating within these sectors. While these results cannot be generalized, they provided insights on border security coordination. GAO is recommending that DHS enhance oversight to ensure efficient use of interagency forums and compliance with interagency agreements; and develop guidance to integrate partner resources to mitigate northern border vulnerabilities. DHS concurred with our recommendations
Employment verification : federal agencies have taken steps to improve E-Verify, but significant challenges remain : report to the Subcommittee on Social Security, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives by United States( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

E-Verify is a system to electronically verify work eligibility and operated by the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the Social Security Administration (SSA). GAO testified in June 2008 that ensuring accuracy and combating fraud were challenges facing E-Verify. As requested, GAO examined the extent to which USCIS and SSA took efforts to (1) reduce tentative nonconfirmations (TNC) and E-Verify's vulnerability to fraud, (2) safeguard employee personal information, and (3) prepare for possible mandatory use by all employers nationwide. GAO reviewed key policy and procedural documents, interviewed relevant DHS and SSA officials, and conducted site visits to three states selected, in part, based on employer types. GAO recommends, among other things, that USCIS disseminate information to employees on the importance of consistently recording their names, DHS components develop procedures to help employees correct inaccurate personal information, USCIS develop reliable cost estimates for E-Verify, and SSA assess risks associated with its E-Verify workload costs
 
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English (29)