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ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS

Overview
Works: 1,529 works in 1,703 publications in 1 language and 1,733 library holdings
Classifications: TA7, 628.97
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS
Profiling Private Dock and Marina-Slip Holders at Corps of Engineers Projects( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The research being conducted under the Recreation Research Program (RRP), as part of the work unit "Measuring the Economic Effects of Boat Dock Permit and Marina-Slip Holders," is designed to estimate the economic impact of these populations on Corps of Engineers water resource projects. This technical note describes the two populations and the research effort
Fluidizer System Design for Channel Maintenance and Sand Bypassing( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This technical note summarizes the design procedure given by Weisman and Lennon (in preparation) for fluidizer systems to be used in channel maintenance and sand bypassing. Weisman and Lennon (1992) provides similar, but less up-to-date information. The main emphasis of this technical note is on design of the fluidizer pipe itself with suggestions concerning other aspects of the system
Numerical Disposal Modeling( Book )

4 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This technical note presents the status of a personal computer (PC) version of numerical disposal models for predicting the short-term fate of dredged material placed in open water. This PC version is an update of an earlier release, and this technical note replaces the earlier technical note DRP-1-02, which should be discarded
Basinwide Considerations for Water Quality Management: Importance of Phosphorus Retention by Reservoirs( Book )

3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reservoirs are designed and operated to control the flow of rivers to achieve flood control, water storage, power generation, irrigation, navigation, and other beneficial uses. From a water control or water quantity standpoint, reservoirs within the same drainage basin are often viewed as an integrated system to be optimized to achieve authorized reservoir uses and basinwide water control objectives. While methods for accomplishing this are well established, similar basinwide considerations for water quality are less common. This technical note provides a theoretical basis for implementing basinwide water quality management by considering the water quality influences of reservoirs on regulated rivers, specifically, the retention of phosphorus
Dredging Research. Vol. 1, No. 1( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Historically, Corps dredging research in the 197Os focused on understanding ecological impacts of dredged material disposal, and on evaluating and managing sediments. In the 198Os, research concentrated on reducing costs of dredging, improving dredging operations, and increasing project management efficiency. The challenge for the 199Os and the 21st century is balancing the navigation dredging mission with environmental protection criteria. To assist with this task, research at WES has integrated the operational and environmental aspects of dredging and disposal in the Dredging Operations and Environmental Research program
Point Intercept and Line Intercept Methods for Aquatic Plant Management by John Douglas Madsen( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this technical note is to apply point intercept and line intercept quantification methods to aquatic plant communities, statistically analyze the resulting data, and apply the data to aquatic plant management research and operations. Quantitative methods typically are not used to evaluate the success of aquatic plant management operations; in fact, many research and demonstration projects fail to collect data suitable for statistical analysis
CGWAVE: A Coastal Surface Water Wave Model of the Mild Slope Equation( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes a new wave-prediction model called CGWAVE. CGWAVE is a genetal-purpose, state-of-the-art wave prediction model. It is applicable to estimation of wave fields in harbors, open coastal regions, coastal inlets, around islands, and around fixed or floating structures. Both monochromatic and spectral waves can be simulated with the CGWAVE model. While CGWAVE simulates the combined effects of wave refraction-diffraction included in the basic mild-slope equation, it also includes the effects of wave dissipation by friction, breaking, nonlinear amplitude dispersion, and harbor entrance losses. CGWAVE is a finite-element model that is interfaced to the Corps of Engineers' Surface-water Modeling System (SMS) for graphics and efficient implementation (pre-processing and post-processing). The classical super-element technique and a new parabolic approximation method developed recently are used to treat the open-boundary condition. An iterative procedure (conjugate gradient method) is used to solve the discretized equations, thus enabling the modeler to deal with large-domain problems. A detailed derivation of the basic theory of the CGWAVE model is provided in Sections 2 and 3. Sections 4 through 6 provide the details of how this theory is implemented numerically. A step-by-step user's guide is provided in Section 7 to ensure safe and efficient usage of the CGWAVE model for practical applications. Example applications used in the development, testing, and validation of CGWAVE are presented in Section 8 of this report
Survey of threatened and endangered wetland and aquatic plants at four Corps of Engineers districts by Linda S Nelson( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The invasion of nuisance exotic plants has been identified as a major threat to the survival and recovery of many threatened and endangered plant species; however, little information exists as to the extent of this problem in wetland and aquatic habitats. Moreover, the impact of aquatic plant management practices on sensitive plant habitat is unknown. Surveys were conducted for four Corps of Engineers (CE) Districts (ST Paul, Seattle, Galveston, and Fort Worth) to identify and establish the location of both federal and state listed threatened and endangered aquatic and wetland plant species that may be at risk as a result of exotic plant invasions. Sixteen percent of the plants listed under the Endangered Species Act were identified as inhabitants of aquatic and wetland environments. On a national scale, the greatest numbers of these species occurred in California, Hawaii, and the southeastern coastal states. Most states within each surveyed CE District also recognized and listed species of local conservation concern, although the methods for listing and ranking and the legal status of these plants varied greatly from state to state. This data inquiry showed that numerous aquatic and wetland plant species are in jeopardy and that a need exists to inventory and manage CE wetland and aquatic resources for both federal- and state-listed threatened and endangered species. Future research is proposed to identify and evaluate the impact of chemical and integrated aquatic plant management strategies for managing non-native nuisance plant species that threaten sensitive aquatic and wetland habitats
Native American Recreation at Corps Projects: Results of Six Focus Groups( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research is being conducted at the Waterways Experiment Station (WES), under the Recreation Research Program (RRP), to determine the existing and future ethnic group use of Corps of Engineers operating projects and to help identify their recreation preferences and needs. This information will be used by decision-makers in project planning and operations. During a 3-year period (fiscal years 1997-99), four ethnic minority groups will be studied: Native-Americans, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Hispanics. This research effort is in response to Executive Order 12862, "Setting Customer Service Standards," and Executive Order 12898, "Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations." Specific objectives of this research are to compare present Corps users to general population proportions; identify relevant information, policies, and studies (from the Corps and other agencies) on ethnic and nontraditional use of Corps projects; determine existing and future ethnic group use of Corps projects and determine recreation preferences and needs; evaluate existing and future needs of ethnic groups; and provide a summary of findings, along with guidance that incorporates considerations for ethnic users in planning and operations decisions
Aquatic dissipation of triclopyr in whole-pond treatment( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The aquatic fate of the triethylamine formulation of triclopyr (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid) was studied in closed-pond systems in California, Missouri, and Texas as whole-pond applications. This study determined dissipation rates of triclopyr and its major metabolites, TCP (3,5,6-trichloropyridinol) and TMP (3,5,6-trichloro-methoxypyridine) in water, sediment, and finfish. Two ponds at each site containing a healthy biological community were treated at 2.5 mg/L triclopyr. Water and sediment samples were collected through 12-week posttreatment, and nontarget animals were collected through 4-week posttreatment. Dissipation rates for triclopyr, TCP, and TMP were similar at each of the study sites, despite differences in weather, water quality, biotic community, light transmission, and geographic location. Half-lives of triclopyr in water ranged from 5.9 to 7.5 days, while TCP ranged from 4.0 to 10.0 days, and TMP ranged from 4.0 to 7.7 days. Levels of triclopyr and TCP declined in sediments at half-lives ranging from 2.8 to 4.6 days and 3.8 to 13.3 days, respectively. Levels of TMP in sediment were below limits of detection. Triclopyr and TCP cleared from fish in relation to concentrations found in the water column. TMP levels in fish were generally an order of magnitude higher than levels of triclopyr and TCP, particularly in the viscera portion of the animals. No adverse effects on water quality or on the nontarget biotic community were found following triclopyr applications. Results of this study were similar to those of triclopyr dissipation studies conducted in reservoirs, lakes, and riverine systems in Georgia, Florida, Minnesota, and Washington. Therefore, the degradation and dissipation of triclopyr and its metabolites are similar in representative systems throughout the continental United States
The Point Load Index and Unconfined Compressive Strength Database System (PLUCS) (Computer Diskette)( Book )

3 editions published between 1991 and 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

File characteristics: Software and Database (6 files); ASCII character set. Physical description: 1 computer diskette; 3 1/2 in.; high density; 1.44MB. System requirements: PC compatible; DOS. The Point Load Index and Unconfined Compressive Strength Database System (PLUCS) was designed to store, retrieve, and compare rock test data. PLUCS provides summary data from individual tests. The data base contains results from over 400 rock tests from 11 material sources (September 1994). Although the PLUCS software will compute and display results using any number of tests, strength comparisons based on a small number of tests may be unreliable. Most point load index tests in this data base were performed on NX(2-1/8 in.) sized samples, which is the common sized used in the Corps. (Author)
Toxicity of Military Unique Compounds in Aquatic Organisms: An Annotated Bibliography (Studies Published Through 1996)( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report contains information on the effects of military unique compounds on aquatic organisms. Over 100 published studies were assimilated from various on-line databases. For each study a full citation, followed by a complete abstract, database accession number, and keyword list, is provided. An alphabetized appendix containing hundreds of military-related keywords, along with corresponding authors' names, is included
Reactive powder concrete for producing sewer, culvert, and pressure pipes( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report documents research to develop and demonstrate the technical and economic viability of reactive powder concrete (RPC) a very high strength, high performance concrete material for producing precast sewer/culvert and pressure pipes with the ultimate program goals of gaining construction industry acceptance and implementing wide scale commercial fabrication of these products. By optimizing the design of the precast RPC pipes, it was projected that commercially competitive, lightweight units could be produced that would reduce handling, shipping, and installation times and provide improved resistance to attack by sulfates and other chemicals. Two mixtures, one flowable and the other zero slump, were selected as representative of RPC pipe production mixtures, and the hardened concrete properties were determined for each mixture. RPC prototype specimens were successfully cast using the wet cast, spun cast, dry cast, and packer head methods. The compressive strengths for RPC prototype specimens were in the range of 140 to 100 MPa. These specimens were steam cured for 24 hr at 70-90 deg C. The C wall pipe specimens cast at Lafarge using the packer head method performed well in both the pressure and three edge bearing tests. The Lafarge specimens showed no signs of leakage for internal pressures of 2.07 MPa and less. Based on results from casting of prototypes, it was concluded that RPC culvert and sewer pipes are technically feasible from a production standpoint. However, only sanitary sewer products appear to be economically viable as the culvert and conventional storm sewer applications appear to be well served by products currently on the market Based on the successful performances of packer head specimens in pressure and there edge bearing tests, it was recommended that research be continued in the development and commercialization of packer head production techniques for sanitary sewer pipe
Dredging Research, Volume 2, Number 2. June 1999( Book )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This bulletin is published in accordance with AR 25-30 as an information dissemination function of the Environmental Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. The publication is part of the technology transfer mission of the Dredging Operations Technical Support (DOTS) Program and includes information about various dredging research areas. Special emphasis will be placed on articles relating to application of research results or technology to specific project needs. This issues contains articles on surface runoff water quality assessment methods, lists of materials and notes published online, information about an upcoming dredged materials management seminar, and various army research projects in progress, including sediment projects
Shock-absorbing materials : report 1 : backpacking materials for deeply buried protective structures by G. C Hoff( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The objective of this study was to review the existing theory and concepts pertaining to the use of backpacking materials around deeply buried protective structures and to provide a limited evaluation of a number of commercially available products in order to determine their suitability for use as backpacking. The basic theory, concepts, and applications pertaining to the use of backpacking around buried structures were compiled and are reviewed. Based on the premise that a one-shot, one-material backpacking system will be adequate for the requirements of a deeply buried structure, a number of backpacking design considerations were established. A cursory examination and review were given to 42 materials from 9 groups of materials to determine their practicality for use as backpacking. The groupings of materials by types include: GRANULAR MATERIALS, HONEYCOMBS, LOW-DENSITY CONCRETES, FLEXIBLE AND RIGID FOAMED PLASTICS, AND FOAMED RUBBER, GLASS, METAL, AND SULFUR. None of the materials investigated and reviewed appear to satisfy all of the design considerations established for a backpacking material; however, this does not discount their being used as backpacking. The ultimate selection of a backpacking should depend on the actual service conditions the material will be subjected to, and these conditions may preclude some of the design considerations that the material in question cannot satisfy. (Author-PL)
Coastal structure inspection technologies : investigation of multibeam sonars for coastal structure surveys by Terri L Prickett( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report discusses research conducted to investigate and develop hydrographic survey equipment for objective, detailed, and quantitative definition of the underwater shape of coastal structures. The research included development of and investigation of the Coastal Structure Acoustic Raster Scanner (CSARS) system. Although much information was gained from CSARS development, the capabilities of commercially available multibeam systems like the SeaBat 9001 multibeam sonar system surpassed the still prototype CSARS. Therefore, this investigation concentrated on multibeam sonar systems, and field demonstrations and trials were conducted with the SeaBat system. The SeaBat system was successful in providing accurate, high resolution hydrographic data on the underwater condition of various structures. With multibeam sonar systems, it is now possible to have types of survey information that were previously impractical to obtain or were unattainable, leading to safer, more cost effective management of coastal structures over their lifetimes
Expedient road construction over sands using lightweight mats by Steve L Webster( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report describes field experiments conducted using lightweight mats for expedient road construction over sands. Field sections were constructed and trafficked over a poorly graded sand (SP) subgrade. Experiment items were trafficked with 5,000 passes of a 41,600 lb, 5 ton military truck. Experiment results showed that an aluminum hexagonal mat, a plastic hexagonal mat, and a fiberglass reinforced mat are capable of providing structural support to military traffic over sand subgrades. An unreinforced and a reinforced plastic mesh mat were not capable of withstanding the applied traffic and are unsuitable for supporting substantial amounts of military traffic
Displayless interface access to spatial data : effects on speaker prosodics by Julia Ann Baca( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Displayless interface technology provides speech based access to computer programs for which visual access is not possible. These applications are increasingly prevalent, especially in situations requiring mobility, such as navigational applications, both civilian and military. To ensure the successful deployment of this technology, however, many human factor issues must be addressed. In particular, the nonvisual nature of this technology requires that it address a problem common to that of providing graphical user interface access to users with visual impairments, i.e., verbal presentation of spatial data. This research investigated a hypothesis rooted in the assumption that strictly verbal access to spatial data places a cognitive burden on the user. The prosodics, or nonverbal aspects, of human speech have been established in the literature as an indicator of cognitive stress. Therefore, this research examined the hypothesis that the cognitive burden placed on the user by displayless access to spatial data would impact the prosodics of the user's speech. Although the hypothesis was assumed to apply to all users, regardless of visual capability, differences in the manifestation of the impact on users with visual impairments versus sighted users were anticipated. Thus, both subjects with and without visual impairments participated in the research. The hypothesis was tested by conducting experiments in which user speech interactions with a prototype speech based navigational system were recorded, postprocessed, and analyzed for prosodic content Subjects participated in two sessions, one using a speech based, displayless interface, and a second using a multimodal interface that included either a visual or tactile display. Subjects with visual impairments included both persons with adventitious as well as congenital sight loss
Species Profile: Henslow's Sparrow (Ammodramus henslowlii) on Military Installations in the Southeastern United States( Book )

4 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii) is a small passerine bird that breeds in the eastern and midwestern United States and southern Canada and winters in the mid-Atlantic and Gulf Coast States. Its breeding range extends from New England and southern Ontario through the Great lakes region and north-central States to South Dakota, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Its winter range extends from northern South Carolina to central Florida and eastern Texas. The Henslow's sparrow is considered to be a species of special concern, as its population has declined significantly across its range. This species historically nested in tallgrass prairie. Optimal breeding habitat consists of tall, dense, grassy vegetation interspersed with forbs and occasional shrubs. Typical habitat includes restored tallgrass prairie, idle grasslands, pastures, meadows, and hayfields with dense cover. Wintering populations of Henslow's sparrow have been documented on three military installations in the southeastern United States; installations in the midwestern and northeastern United States should benefit most from this report because the sparrow's decreasing breeding range is located in these regions. This report is one of a series of Species Profiles being developed for threatened, endangered, and sensitive species inhabiting plant communities in the southeastern United States. The work is being conducted as part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The report is designed to supplement information provided in plant community management reports for major United States plant communities found on military installations. Information provided on the Henslow's sparrow includes status, life history and ecology, habitat requirements, impacts and causes of decline, habitat assessment techniques, inventory and monitoring, and management and protection
Species Profile: Southeastern American Kestrel (Falco sparverius paulus) on Military Installations in the Southeastern United States (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program)( )

3 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The southeastern American kestrel (Falco sparvenus paulus) is one of two subspecies of kestrels that occur in the United States. It is a former candidate for listing as Threatened or Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The southeastern subspecies is a nonmigratory resident of the southern Gulf Coast States, now extirpated over much of its former range. Current range includes portions of east Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Southeastern American kestrels prefer open longleaf pine-turkey oak sandhill communities, agricultural/mixed hardwood communities, pine flatwoods, old-growth slash pine, and grasslands and pastures. They have been documented on several military installations in the Southeast. This report is one of a series of 'Species Profiles' being developed for threatened, endangered, and sensitive species inhabiting southeastern United States plant communities. The work is being conducted as part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The report is designed to supplement information provided in plant community management reports for major United States plant communities found on military installations. Information provided on the southeastern American kestrel includes status, life history and ecology, habitat requirements, impacts and cause of decline, management and protection, and inventory and monitoring
 
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English (49)