WorldCat Identities

Andrews, Timothy D.

Overview
Works: 4 works in 4 publications in 1 language and 4 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Timothy D Andrews
Culture Counts: Cultural Bias in the National Security Strategy( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The May 1997 document entitled "A National Security Strategy for a New Century" offers an ambitious international agenda for an epoch which has thus far been marked by domestic concerns about the costs of maintaining a powerful U.S. presence around the world. Funding for the conduct of diplomatic operations has plunged almost 50 percent in real terms over the past 15 years, and the end of the Cold War brought a one-third cut in defense spending. Meanwhile, this National Security Strategy document identifies many new challenges and potential threats to U.S. national interests. None of these threats assumes the magnitude of the vanquished Soviet threat or implies the expenditures the U.S. incurred in countering it, but, collectively, they demand that more resources be devoted to national security than either the American body politic or our national leaders have thus far seemed inclined to commit. It would be tempting to dismiss "A National Security Strategy for a New Century" as a collection of insubstantial platitudes intended for public consumption and to ask for a copy of the "real" strategy. But such an approach would ignore the genuine views that underlie this blue-jacketed document and the extent to which it is likely to frame the terms of debate over how and with what means the strategy should be implemented. Instead, this outline of strategy should be taken at face value and its explicit and implicit content analyzed rigorously, so that appropriate resources and means may be applied to the attainment of priority goals and objectives. Assumptions are critical, if often implicit, elements of any strategy document. They form the foundation upon which the strategy's analytical framework is built. If important assumptions are erroneous, the validity of the entire strategy is called into question. This brief essay will examine one apparent implicit assumption and discuss its implications for the overall feasibility of a national security strategy
Revolution and Evolution: Understanding Dynamism in Military Affairs( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pundits and analysts overuse the term Revolution in Military Affairs This essay seeks to draw distinctions among three fundamentally different types of change in the nature of military affairs. Different dynamics imply different optimal responses to the challenge of change. To the extent that the term Revolution in Military Affairs can be systematically disaggregated, a better understanding of its resulting components may be possible. This enhanced comprehension could lead to more efficient allocation of scarce resources-a critical consideration in a period of rapidly expanding scientific and technical knowledge, uncertainty about national security threats, tight fiscal constraints and great enthusiasm in some circles for information warfare 2
Dysfunctional Equilibrium. U.S. Policy Toward Nigeria, 1995-1997( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

By early 1995, it was clear that the policy tools the US had adopted in response to the Nigerian political crisis were not having the desired effect of bringing about a rapid restoration of genuine, democratically-elected civilian government. A debate ensued, should the US change its approach and attempt to engage Nigeria's military rulers more constructively, or did the route to policy success lie in broadening, tightening and strengthening the existing array of mostly punitive measures? This debate has continued inconclusively for almost three years, despite a number of significant developments within Nigeria, within Africa and within the context of US relations with Africa. The result has been a dysfunctional equilibrium. Everyone involved knows that the policy in place does not work, but it has been impossible to implement a replacement for it. Why?
South Asia and U.S. National Security Strategy, 1998-2008( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper seeks, very briefly, to outline the strategic context, define the national interests of the two major players and the United States, identify threats, challenges and opportunities, conceptualize trends and scenarios, delineate tools and means of influence, and suggest policy choices. In the interest of remaining close to the recommended paper length, we have glossed over some elements in the analysis framework and left implicit others, notably the policy objectives category. Our paper looks toward 2008, and we wish to note that a number of our conclusions would have been different if the timeline had reached out to 2025
 
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