WorldCat Identities

Bloomfield, J. R.

Overview
Works: 18 works in 35 publications in 1 language and 446 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: TL152.3,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by J. R Bloomfield
Human factors aspects of transferring control from the driver to the Automated Highway System with varying degrees of automation( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The driver's response to decreasing vehicle separations during transitions into the automated lane by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This experiment is one in a series exploring human factors issues related to the Automated Highway System (AHS). The comfort level of the driver of the lead vehicle of a string of automated vehicles was determined (a) under normal AHS operating conditions, and (b) while a second vehicle was joining the string as the new lead vehicle. The experiment was conducted in the Iowa Driving Simulator. A generic AHS configuration was used--the left lane was reserved for automated vehicles, the center and right lanes contained unautomated vehicles, the center lane was not a dedicated transition lane, there were no barriers between the automated and unautomated lanes. Sixty drivers participated in the experiment--half male, half female; half between the ages of 25 and 34 years, half 65 or older
The driver's response to an automated highway system with reduced capacity( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the results of one in a series of experiments that investigated driver performance in a generic Automated Highway System (AHS) configuration. The experiment examined how well drivers could take over a function(s) - steering alone, speed control alone or both - from the AHS when it was no longer able to perform that function(s). Results are reported
Human factors aspects of the transfer of control from the driver to the Automated Highway System( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human factors aspects of the transfer of control from the automated highway system to the driver( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The first two experiments in a series exploring human factors issues related to the Automated Highway System (AHS) used a generic AHS configuration--the left lane reserved for automated vehicles, the center and right lanes containing unautomated vehicles, no transition lane, and no barriers between the automated and unautomated lanes--that was simulated in the Iowa Driving Simulator (IDS). The IDS has a moving base hexapod platform containing a mid-sized sedan. Imagery was projected onto a 3.35-rad (180 deg) screen in front of the driver, and onto a 1.13-rad (60 deg) screen to the rear. Thirty-six drivers between the ages of 25 and 34 years participated in the first experiment; 24 drivers who were age 65 or older took part in the second. Both experiments explored the transfer of control from the AHS to the driver when the driver's task was to leave the automated lane. The driver, who was traveling under automated control in a string of vehicles in the automated lane, had to take control, drive from the automated lane into the center lane, then leave the freeway
The effect on normal driving behavior of traveling under automated control by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guidelines for the use of raised pavement markers by A. R Grant( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Visual Factors in Target Disruption by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study sought to determine: (1) the relationship between variations in the properties of disruptors, and (2) the effectiveness of those disruptors in concealing military targets from visual detection when they are placed in various classes of natural background. A disruptor is an umbrella-like object attached to a target so as to obscure part of it. Test results indicate that: Targets are harder to find where the mean contrast level of the ground is close in value to the mean contrast level of the foliage, and where the variability around the mean contrast level is high; Small targets are easier to hide; and It is easier to obscure the outline of an elongated target than a compact target. To reduce the probability of a target being detected or of increasing the time required to detect it, the following suggestions are made. The target should be placed in an area with relatively dark ground and foliage, where ground and foliage are heterogeneous rather than homogenous. The color used as the basis for the disruptive material should be as dark as the ground. Disruptors should also have other colors which are even darker. It is most effective to use several small disruptors placed to break up target outlines as much as possible
Final report on the optimal placement of military targets in cluttered terrains by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This experimental program investigated the optimal placement of military targets in cluttered terrains. Three experimental areas were explored. The first area involved an embedded target search display. The discriminability of targets in this display was measured in three ways: (1) by reducing viewing time, (2) by blurring the observer's view of the display, and (3) by reducing transmissivity. A competition search situation was investigated in the second experimental area; the optical blur measure of discriminability was used. Visual search behavior was directly investigated in the third series of experiments. The findings were as follows: (1) search was slower when two areas of a given clutter density had to be searched than when a single area was searched; (2) compared to an isolated search area, the presence of an adjacent, similarly cluttered nonsearched area may result in search being slower; and (3) the presence of different clutter densities in a nonsearched area resulted in different search time distributions for search in an adjacent area. The data from these various experiments will help in characterizing the relation between a target and its detectability. Such work in perception is a necessary step toward the development of camouflage standards for the prime visual threat
Effects of fexofenadine, diphenhydramine, and alcohol on driving by J. M Weiler( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Driving simulation study: bilateral array multifocal versus bilateral AMO focal intraocular lenses by K. A Featherstone( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The driver's response to an automated highway system with reduced capability by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tracking with Intermittent Radar Coverage: I. Interruptions After Each Collected Frame of Imagery( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Imagery simulating the output of a moving target indicator (MTI) radar was used in two experiments to determine the effect on the ability of radar operators to track targets moving in one particular area, when the radar was being switched intermittently to provide coverage of a second area as well. In both experiments, we investigated the effects of switching away from the area of interest after each complete scan of that area, varying the length of each interruption that occurred before returning for another scan of the primary area. The frames of simulated MTI radar imagery used for each condition were shown in time compression to twelve operators in both experiments. The results of the two experiments seem to present a coherent picture. Increasing the length of the interruptions in coverage from 15 to 30 seconds had little effect on tracking performance. With interruptions of 45 to 90 seconds, performance was worse with smaller target units, containing ten vehicles, than it was for larger units. However, with interruptions of 120 seconds, there was a decrement for all target units, large and small, compared to the level of tracking performance achieved with shorter interruptions
Tracking with Intermittent Radar Coverage: II. Interruptions After Two or More Consecutively-Collected Frames of Imagery( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Simulated moving target indicator (MTI) radar imagery was used in the two experiments performed in this, one of an on-going series of studies in which we are investigating conditions of intermittent radar coverage. In the first of these experiments there were two, and in the second experiment there were two, three, or four consecutively-collected frames of imagery before each interruption in coverage. In both experiments there were twelve operators and the imagery was presented in time compression. The results of the two experiments showed that the use of more than one frame of imagery before the occurrence of the interruptions in radar coverage resulted in improved performance. For the larger, 25- and 50-vehicle units, two consecutively- collected frames, and for the smaller 10-vehicle units, four consecutively collected frames helped to prevent the decrement in tracking performance that otherwise occurred with 120-second interruptions
Visual search by J. R Bloomfield( )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Driving performance after an extended period of travel in an automated highway system by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cognitive processes in visual search by J. R Bloomfield( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Helmet Mounted Displays: An Experimental Investigation of Display Luminance and Contrast( )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study was carried out in order to validate experimentally the predictions of previous analytic work (Cohen, 1973). The objective was to determine the best combination of filter coatings and display luminances required for viewing the Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) against a wide, but operationally realistic variety of background luminances. The predictions relating beamsplitter transmittance, visor transmittance and display luminance to performance were largely supported by the data
 
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Languages
English (35)