WorldCat Identities

Cahan, Herbert B.

Overview
Works: 96 works in 99 publications in 1 language and 99 library holdings
Genres: Educational films  Internet videos  Juvenile works  Children's films  History  Documentary television programs  Nature television programs  Popular works  Nonfiction television programs  Documentary films 
Classifications: PN1997, 610.940902
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Herbert B Cahan
Archaeologist( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole describes what archaeologists do and why. Dr. William F. Albright explains how to determine the age of an object by datable style and carbon-14 testing. He then shows slides and diagrams of the Hajar bin Humeid mounds in south Arabia. As authenticator of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Dr. Albright discusses authentication methods for writings and scripts, such as comparing changes in the Hebrew alphabet and dated documents of the same period. Lastly, he describes qualities required for becoming an archaeologist
Courtroom doctors( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The topic of this program is the use of forensic medicine in scientific crime detection. A film shows Dr. Russell S. Fisher, lecturer in forensic medicine at Johns Hopkins University and chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, at work in his lab. He is assisted by a team consisting of a secretary, chemists, a photographic specialist, doctors, police, and specialists in the physical sciences. In dealing with crimes of violence or mysterious death, Dr. Fisher asks: Who is the victim? Is it murder or suicide? When did it happen? How did it happen? Who did it? He shows a photo of a charred body and explains when and how the death occurred and the importance of an autopsy and a post-mortem examination. Dr. Fisher compares blood samples and explains how they are used by a courtroom doctor to exonerate or convict the accused. Using sketches from Lynn Poole's book "Science, the Super Sleuth," Dr. Fisher describes what he looks for in knifing murders. He also tells the case of the arsenic in the pancake flour and demonstrates how the presence of arsenic was confirmed. Lynn Poole shows snapshots of Dr. Fisher as a student in the toxicology lab at Georgia Tech as well as photos from throughout his career in forensic medicine. Dr. Fisher says that this career is different and challenging every day and that there are many opportunities for medical examiners and other trained specialists, with salaries from $17,000-20,000
Librarian by Haunted Love (Musical group)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland is shown as a good example of a large urban public library system. Acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and reference functions are discussed as librarians and other library staff help patrons. James Dickson, a librarian at the Pratt Library, says that libraries contain much more than books as he shows maps, films, records and other materials. He talks about his educational background and what led him into librarianship. A good general college education followed by a masters degree in library science is needed to beome a librarian
Railroad engineer( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chester Henry, assistant chief engineer in charge of construction for the Pennsylvania Railroad, discusses railroad facelifting for both trains and tracks. He comments that a railroad is never complete because of its responsibility to change in industry. Mr. Henry explains the car classification operation at Conway Yard near Pittsburgh, and a film further elaborates on the process, including the role of the hump conductor. Railroad engineers must see the overall picture to construct a line with minimum cost and maximum efficiency. For example, they must find the best route by using aerial photography. Film clips show techniques developed by engineers to unload shipments of foreign ore onto railroad cars. Electronic and mechanical engineers also develop new railway technology, such as track safety features; maintain rolling stock, as at the Hollidaysburg, PA freight car repair shop; and design experimental passenger cars, such as the stainless steel Budd cars and the GM Aerotrain. Carl Bergman notes that inspecting and maintaining track and allied structures acquaints railroad engineers in training with all aspects of the job, even though most maintenance jobs are now mechanized. He explains the composition and construction of a track and narrates a film showing a machine that detects defects in the rail and other maintenance equipment. Both men recommend that interested high school students take math and general science courses followed by a college degree in engineering. There are about 172 different railroad job classifications, including positions in the clerical and accounting departments for women
Heating houses with the sun's rays( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mr. Contini briefly explains both a film about photosynthesis and a pictorial history of solar energy, including Hero's solar devices in Egypt, Frank Schuman's 1910 solar pump for irrigation, C.G. Abbott's solar flash boilers, and Felix Trombe's solar ovens for industrial uses. Dr. Telkes shows photos of a solar-heated house in Massachusetts and explains a diagram of its operation and a graph of its chemical storage method. She refers to recent books on energy sources of the future by Palmer C. Putnam and Eugene Ayres. Dr. Telkes displays the experimental solar oven she has designed for primitive civilizations in the tropics, and a film shows the oven's success in baking rolls. Solar stills are useful for desalination of salt water, according to Dr. Telkes. She refers to a large one built by Charles Wilson in Chile and demonstrates a still's use with a simple model. She notes that the U.S. Dept. of Interior's saline water program's goal is to convert arid lands through solar still irrigation
Making light behave( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Beams of light can be controlled by polarization, by rotating polaroid filters to focus or block out light. Cross polarizer filters can eliminate car headlight glare at night, and reduce reflection on camera lenses, microscopes, compasses for polar navigation, and the brightness of white paper. Sunglasses also use polaroid lenses that aid drivers by cutting down on pavement glare
The doctor by U. A Fanthorpe( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this program Lynn Poole shows that being a doctor is not all drama and glamour but rather personal and financial sacrifice, intellectual ability, discipline, and hard work. Three men at different points in their medical education each list their increasing responsibilities. John Freese, a third year medical student, says that one must enjoy science, have stamina, and be able to deal with people to survive medical school. James Allen, an intern in medicine at Johns Hopkins, describes his duties and adds that doctors need to deal compassionately with relatives of patients as well as with the patients themselves. William Knauer, a resident in ophthalmology, has been studying medicine for twelve years and describes his responsibilities at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Clinic. Mr. Poole also introduces and interviews the wives of these men, who agree that their role is to be understanding of a doctor's time and situation and to have something at home to keep them busy and happy
Dividends of science( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A film produced by the U.S. Navy lists some recent defense research with benefits to civilians: raising research animals in sterile conditions; discovering unknown properties of metals by super heating and super cooling; researching man's reactions to motion; studying nuclear collisions and cosmic rays as alternative sources of power; creating heat with aluminum solar reflectors; studying solar chromosphere and solar activity; and developing computers, the cyclotron, fluid dynamics, surgical techniques, etc. A film by the U.S. Air Force then shows the by-products of their research: rayon and nylon tires, fiber A weather resistant fabric, stereoscopic strip camera for mapping large areas quickly, electric blankets and space heaters, and ground control approach (GCA) used at airports. The final message is that defense research and engineering funds pay dividends by providing improvements in daily living
The Mathematician( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

James Braddock, an actuary and second vice president with New York Life Insurance Co., notes that there are only 900 fully qualified actuaries in the United States. He then explains how insurance is based on the mathematics of probability, the ratio of favorable ways over total ways, and demonstrates this concept with dice and poker hands. This applies to the actuary's responsibility of underwriting life insurance for people with hazardous jobs or high health risks. Such a career is a planning and administrative job requiring knowledge and judgment. Dr. Kelso Morrill, an associate professor of math at Johns Hopkins University, describes pure mathematics as the ability to think logically in abstract terms, but one also needs patience, enthusiasm, and creativity to teach it. He explains and compares the decimal and binary systems of counting. The binary system was introduced by the German mathematician Leibniz and is now the basis for computer calculations. Dr. Lewis Fulton, an applied mathematician, discusses the IBM high-speed computer's mathematical functions and decision logic. Even with the programming language FORTRAN (formula translation), a computer must still receive instructions or a program from a live mathematician in order to process information. A film shows a computer receiving binary-coded information from typed punch cards and storing it on magnetic tape, as for the Social Security Administration's records. Lynn Poole concludes the program by reiterating the opportunities in all areas of math
Da Vinci, man of science( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Leonardo da Vinci first developed the odometer for measuring distance, the jack for lifting heavy objects, and the pile driver. He did not have modern power sources or advanced mathematics, but used his remarkable intuition and observation to make many scientific discoveries including: gears, cutting tools, lathes, bridge trusses, clocks, sawmills and hydraulics. Excerpts from the film Leonardo da Vinci from Pictura Films Corporation are shown, highlighting the many artistic and scientific developments from his notebooks including models of flying machines, catapults, cannons, guns, and tanks
The peaceful atom( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This program is the first in a three-part series on peacetime uses of atomic energy. A brief animated film reviews such concepts as neutrons and protons in a nucleus surrounded by electrons. There are 92 kinds of naturally occurring atoms, and changes can only be made to an atom by altering its nucleus. When the nucleus is split, it gives off energy. Mr. Strauss, the chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), cites President Eisenhower's 1953 "Atoms for Peace" speech to the United Nations in which he suggests a world pool of atomic materials for peaceful uses, such as commercial electrical power. Dr. Hafstad, Director of the Reactor Development Division of AEC, discusses the costs and problems of harnessing atomic power. He points out that although our coal and oil supplies are dwindling and uranium supplies are vast, the cost of generating power from the atom is currently prohibitive. However, he predicts that, within the next five to fifteen years, as nuclear power is developed, its costs will fall
Birth of a flame( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dr. Olsen, one of the team of scientists from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, briefly discusses the history of fire. He explains the zones and structure of a candle's flame and uses the Schlieren system of photography to detect the density gradients in the rising gas. Capt. Gayhart discusses the study of early spark-ignited flames, and he diagrams the operation of the Schlieren system. Mr. Edmondson shows three films of a flame's development in a stream of combustible gas taken at 100,000, 20 million, and 200 million frames per second
Metal for bones( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Orthopedic surgeon Robinson describes three types of bones that break: ribs or skull, with which the underlying organs must be protected; facial bones, which require accurate, fine correction; and large, long bones, which must be held in place promptly and securely. Dr. Robinson shows x-rays of broken femurs and a diagram of how bone heals, explaining that the deformity must be corrected first and then held in place until a bridge of new bone is formed. A patient demonstrates the range of motion in his formerly fractured elbow that was held together with a metal plate and screws. Other x-rays display the intramedulary, a diamond-shaped stainless steel nail used to hold a femur fracture in place and allow weight bearing. A model of the hip joint and femur with surrounding muscles proves that without such a supportive rod, the muscles would override the bones and cause deformity or shorten the length of the leg. Dr. Southwick introduces former patient William Brown and explains how a metal rod was inserted
Living Together by David Attenborough( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dr. Whitehorn briefly discusses the roles of the psychiatrist and the social worker and notes that the psychiatric clinic is like a lab of human nature. Dr. Frank, a psychiatrist, and Ms. Slaughter, a psychiatric social worker, then interact with actors to dramatize three actual cases: a family's conflict, an individual's depression, and an adolescent's problems. They conclude that the problems of living are common and solvable
Automotive stylist( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole rides into the program in a Model T Ford, followed by a Thunderbird. Guest Gene Bordinat, vice president of Ford Motor Co. in charge of styling and assistant to George W. Walker, is the chief designer of the Mercury. He explains that in designing a car, he must consider not only what the American public wants but also management's bottom line, since a complete body and chassis change costs the company $75 million. Because of automotive competition, Bordinat can not show forthcoming models, but he does display some "dream cars," such as the XM Turnpike Cruiser and the Taj Mahal, which are impractical to produce but which offer design features applicable to practical cars. He enumerates the steps in creating new models from design to production, including engineering, manufacturing, financing, and safety considerations. A film shows the Ford assembly line and testing labs. Bordinat shows a typical 3/8 scale clay model of the XM Turnpike Cruiser and discusses its design features and proportions. His design ideas come from observing various shapes, and he applies them to auto styling, such as elements of a B-52 bomber appearing as impact units (bumpers) on the Cruiser. Prospective stylists should like automobiles and study art at a school such as the Cleveland Institute of Art. In conclusion Mr. Poole asks Mr. Bordinat to envision cars of the future, which he describes
Last one in( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A film shows scenes of water recreation and sporting activities such as fishing, boating, walking in waterfront parks, and swimming. The film notes that infections and drowning are the primary dangers of swimming and that with the growth of safe pool facilities with lifeguards, swimmers can learn proper swimming techniques. Lynn Poole pays tribute to the YMCA, pioneers in teaching swimming and water safety. Lou Martin, Baltimore YMCA's aquatic director, explains and demonstrates the Holger-Nielsen (arm lift, back pressure) manual method of artificial respiration. The equipment used in the mechanical method is then demonstrated by Martin McMann of the Baltimore City police
The writer by Richard Wilbur( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole states that writing is a craft, a business, and a difficult profession, as he has discovered from writing five books himself. Colonel Mason, a graduate of Harvard and student of John Gallishaw, is the author of numerous historical novels and juvenile books, some translated into 18 languages. He maintains that waiting for inspiration is nonsense and that the writer should keep regular hours. His method of composition is to dictate his stories to a secretary who transcribes the drafts on yellow, then blue, then white paper. Colonel Mason explains that the two types of novels are stories of accomplishment and stories of decision. The elements of any story should include who, when, where, and how and should create urgencies or crises, as his impromptu story exemplifies. He describes his travels and research for his most recently published book, Silver Leopard, about the First Crusade, and displays his research notebook for his current work, Our Valiant Few, about the Civil War. His advice to young writers is to study with a competent teacher, write daily, don't quit your job after selling your first story, and remember that writing is more perspiration than inspiration. The second guest, Holmes Alexander, studied and wrote at Princeton and Cambridge. He then taught writing at the McDonough School, a private Baltimore school, and wrote book reviews and other pieces. When he was elected to the Maryland legislature, he wrote about his campaign and sold the story to Harpers. After that he became a reporter with The Baltimore Sun, covering county politics and Johns Hopkins University. He wrote biographies of Martin Van Buren and Aaron Burr as well as other books, nonfiction articles on horses, and fictional baseball stories, which he sold to such magazines as Saturday Evening Post, Colliers, and Esquire. He became Kiplinger's senior editor and ultimately a syndicated columnist. His advice to aspiring writers is to go where the trouble is to get the news, be able to write anywhere, and ignore obstacles to writing. A party at the end of this program celebrates the eighth year of Johns Hopkins programs with WAAM and the first anniversary of "Tomorrow's Careers." Herbert Cahan hosts the party, Mrs. Kennard Calfee presents the cake, and Lynn Poole introduces the staff. In addition to those normally appearing in the credits, he includes Dick Zibner (new assistant producer), Andy Bevins (floor manager), John Stokes and Allen Holmes (cameramen), and mentions Herman and Ben Cohen (of WAAM Network) and John Charles Daly (of ABC)
Human relations( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

During the Great Depression of the early 1930's the McCormick Company made a commitment to its employees to raise salaries, reduce working hours, develop a profit sharing plan and provide other benefits to improve morale and thus production. Employees need to receive recognition and participate in management decisions. The personnel manager is involved with recruiting, selection, hiring, training, progress appraisal, wage determination, morale, counseling, grievance negotiation, working conditions, and benefit programs. It is important to develop leaders for tomorrow who understand human relations in the field of personnel management, which involves psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics
Investment banker( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole explains the cycle of investment and shows a film clip on American mass production and the role of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Guest S. Bonsal White, Jr. is an investment banker with Baltimore's Alexander Brown & Sons, the oldest investment house in the United States. He explains that brokers match sellers with buyers and therefore need to know the financial outlook of companies in order to advise their clients. He describes the differences between stocks, bonds, and debentures, all forms of securities. In a mock client interaction, Mr. White welcomes the prospective client regardless of investment amount (showing a chart of typical American shareholders' investments), offers facts about companies on the NYSE, assures confidentiality, and explains commission fees. A brief film shows Wall Street activity and reiterates the investment process of the NYSE
The most precise balance in the world( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole distinguishes between weighing and other forms of measurement and comments that the Latin word for balance is "bi-lancis," meaning two dishes, as in the two pan level beam instrument. He shows sketches of other early balances, including the Egyptian first class lever and the Roman steelyard, both still in use today. Other types of scales and the kilogram weight kept by the Bureau of National Standards are shown. Johns Hopkins University chemistry professor Alsoph H. Corwin exhibits the highly precise balance he developed to measure very small samples of rare substances for microchemical manipulations. His assistant, Joseph Walter, demonstrates how magnetism, heat, vibration, and static can interfere with accurate measurements, and Dr. Corwin explains how his balance avoids all of these interferences. Dr. Corwin describes the parts of the balance, including the boron carbide knife edge bearings, and explains its operation. The studio camera also shows what operators of Corwin's balance see to discover the equilibrium point
 
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Languages
English (23)