WorldCat Identities

Calfee, Kennard

Overview
Works: 135 works in 139 publications in 1 language and 139 library holdings
Genres: Educational films  Internet videos  Juvenile works  Children's films  History  Documentary films  Biography  Short films  Personal narratives  Posters 
Classifications: PN1997, 610.940902
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Kennard Calfee
Librarian by Haunted Love (Musical group)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland is shown as a good example of a large urban public library system. Acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and reference functions are discussed as librarians and other library staff help patrons. James Dickson, a librarian at the Pratt Library, says that libraries contain much more than books as he shows maps, films, records and other materials. He talks about his educational background and what led him into librarianship. A good general college education followed by a masters degree in library science is needed to beome a librarian
Courtroom doctors( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On this program about forensic medicine, Dr. Guerin, from the Maryland State Medical Examiner's Office, describes the case of a body found in a burned house and shows photographs of forensic evidence to prove this was not a homicide. By comparing a series of skulls, Dr. Guerin explains how to determine the age of the victim by examining the suture lines and the sex by looking at the nasal ridges and angle. The sex can also be determined by the pelvic bones, and the height can be computed by measurement of long bones such as the femur. Thus, knowledge of anthropology, anatomy, and radiology are necessary for forensic scientists. Dr. Freimuth discusses the chemistry of forensic science and performs chemical tests to determine the presence of arsenic in the death of a child. Dr. Lovitt points out that twenty percent of all Maryland state deaths need to be investigated. This often involves autopsies for courtroom evidence. He gives examples of cases, and he diagrams a congenital aneurysm, which led to hemorrhaging and caused sudden death by natural causes. Dr. Fisher discusses that gunshots are the most common method of homicide and shows how bullets and shotgun blasts leave patterns of damage in the body
Archaeologist( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole describes what archaeologists do and why. Dr. William F. Albright explains how to determine the age of an object by datable style and carbon-14 testing. He then shows slides and diagrams of the Hajar bin Humeid mounds in south Arabia. As authenticator of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Dr. Albright discusses authentication methods for writings and scripts, such as comparing changes in the Hebrew alphabet and dated documents of the same period. Lastly, he describes qualities required for becoming an archaeologist
Campus Christmas( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program features Christmas music by the Johns Hopkins University Glee Club, directed by James Mitchell, and the University of Maryland Mixed Vocal Group, directed by Charles Haslup. The University of Maryland group sings "Winter Wonderland," "I'll Be Home for Christmas," "White Christmas," "Come, All Ye Faithful," and "Holy Night." The Hopkins Glee Club sings the Ukrainian hymn "Glory to God," "Go Tell It on the Mountain," "Indulci Jubilo," "See That Babe in the Lowly Manger," and "The Bells." Johns Hopkins student composer Richard Kapp plays "Bells," "Wassail," and "Boy Meets Santa," original Christmas pieces for the piano. Hopkins president Milton S. Eisenhower presents his annual Christmas message, discussing the traditions of the celebration and observation of this holiday, the widely divergent moral convictions threatening the world today, and the qualities of good character
Making light behave( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Beams of light can be controlled by polarization, by rotating polaroid filters to focus or block out light. Cross polarizer filters can eliminate car headlight glare at night, and reduce reflection on camera lenses, microscopes, compasses for polar navigation, and the brightness of white paper. Sunglasses also use polaroid lenses that aid drivers by cutting down on pavement glare
The doctor by U. A Fanthorpe( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this program Lynn Poole shows that being a doctor is not all drama and glamour but rather personal and financial sacrifice, intellectual ability, discipline, and hard work. Three men at different points in their medical education each list their increasing responsibilities. John Freese, a third year medical student, says that one must enjoy science, have stamina, and be able to deal with people to survive medical school. James Allen, an intern in medicine at Johns Hopkins, describes his duties and adds that doctors need to deal compassionately with relatives of patients as well as with the patients themselves. William Knauer, a resident in ophthalmology, has been studying medicine for twelve years and describes his responsibilities at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Clinic. Mr. Poole also introduces and interviews the wives of these men, who agree that their role is to be understanding of a doctor's time and situation and to have something at home to keep them busy and happy
Investment banker( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole explains the cycle of investment and shows a film clip on American mass production and the role of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Guest S. Bonsal White, Jr. is an investment banker with Baltimore's Alexander Brown & Sons, the oldest investment house in the United States. He explains that brokers match sellers with buyers and therefore need to know the financial outlook of companies in order to advise their clients. He describes the differences between stocks, bonds, and debentures, all forms of securities. In a mock client interaction, Mr. White welcomes the prospective client regardless of investment amount (showing a chart of typical American shareholders' investments), offers facts about companies on the NYSE, assures confidentiality, and explains commission fees. A brief film shows Wall Street activity and reiterates the investment process of the NYSE
Heartbeat of the orchestra( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole displays a chart of the orchestra sections: strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. Dr. William Hart, timpanist with the Baltimore Symphonic Orchestra and professor at the Peabody conservatory of Music, defines the elements of music: rhythm, melody, and harmony and demonstrates each of them on the piano, noting that the percussion instruments are the dispensers of rhythm. He gives a brief history of percussive music while showing instruments such as the timbro, castanets, cymbals, tambourine, and Chinese temple blocks. With the assistance of fellow timpanist Dr. William G. DeLeon, Dr. Hart demonstrates and explains the snare drum, the most common percussive instrument; the xylophone and its use in modern compositions such as the "Sabre Dance"; the cymbals and their contrasting use in Wagner's "Die Walkure" and Debussy's "Festivals"; and the kettle drums, or timpani, which can be tuned and which provide the heartbeat of the orchestra
First steps : worldwide response to the landmine crisis by James E Connolly( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole points out the country's increasing need for engineers, scientists, technicians, and researchers. Dr. John Woodburn, assistant director of the Johns Hopkins masters in teaching program, offers courses to working teachers wanting an advanced degree. He maintains that teachers can interest children in science by exposing them to the phenomena of nature, asking questions, teaching them to notice things around them, and showing them the scientific principles in everyday things. To illustrate, teacher Jacqueline Wolfe performs a simple experiment, and students in her fifth grade class from Woodmore School in Baltimore, MD, observe, hypothesize, test tentative hypotheses, and verbalize final conclusions. Dr. Woodburn suggests that other teaching aids, such as microscopes, telescopes, blocks, and models, also stimulate young minds
Dividends of science( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A film produced by the U.S. Navy lists some recent defense research with benefits to civilians: raising research animals in sterile conditions; discovering unknown properties of metals by super heating and super cooling; researching man's reactions to motion; studying nuclear collisions and cosmic rays as alternative sources of power; creating heat with aluminum solar reflectors; studying solar chromosphere and solar activity; and developing computers, the cyclotron, fluid dynamics, surgical techniques, etc. A film by the U.S. Air Force then shows the by-products of their research: rayon and nylon tires, fiber A weather resistant fabric, stereoscopic strip camera for mapping large areas quickly, electric blankets and space heaters, and ground control approach (GCA) used at airports. The final message is that defense research and engineering funds pay dividends by providing improvements in daily living
Scientists of tomorrow( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole gives the statistics of U.S. graduates in science and predicts the numbers through 1961, noting that a growing supply of competent scientists is critical. He discusses "juvenile delinquents" and suggests that a constructive way to guide them is through the Science Talent Search. In order to qualify, student contestants must submit answers to an examination measuring their science aptitude, a record of their grades, personal data by their teachers, and a 1,000-word project report. In the thirteenth annual Talent Search for Westinghouse Science Scholarships, 32 boys and 8 girls throughout the United States received a trip to Washington, D.C. to compete for final scholarships. Photos show some finalists during their trip visiting such scientific sites as the Bureau of Standards, the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, the National Institutes of Health, and the Naval Ordnance Lab. In the studio, $400 scholarship winners Mary Jeanne Kreek, of Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C., explains her project on allergies, and Victor A. Schmidt, of Milford Mill High School in Baltimore County, demonstrates his planetarium project. The program concludes with photos of a random selection of the other forty winners and their projects
The most precise balance in the world( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole distinguishes between weighing and other forms of measurement and comments that the Latin word for balance is "bi-lancis," meaning two dishes, as in the two pan level beam instrument. He shows sketches of other early balances, including the Egyptian first class lever and the Roman steelyard, both still in use today. Other types of scales and the kilogram weight kept by the Bureau of National Standards are shown. Johns Hopkins University chemistry professor Alsoph H. Corwin exhibits the highly precise balance he developed to measure very small samples of rare substances for microchemical manipulations. His assistant, Joseph Walter, demonstrates how magnetism, heat, vibration, and static can interfere with accurate measurements, and Dr. Corwin explains how his balance avoids all of these interferences. Dr. Corwin describes the parts of the balance, including the boron carbide knife edge bearings, and explains its operation. The studio camera also shows what operators of Corwin's balance see to discover the equilibrium point
Da Vinci, man of science( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Leonardo da Vinci first developed the odometer for measuring distance, the jack for lifting heavy objects, and the pile driver. He did not have modern power sources or advanced mathematics, but used his remarkable intuition and observation to make many scientific discoveries including: gears, cutting tools, lathes, bridge trusses, clocks, sawmills and hydraulics. Excerpts from the film Leonardo da Vinci from Pictura Films Corporation are shown, highlighting the many artistic and scientific developments from his notebooks including models of flying machines, catapults, cannons, guns, and tanks
Automotive stylist( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole rides into the program in a Model T Ford, followed by a Thunderbird. Guest Gene Bordinat, vice president of Ford Motor Co. in charge of styling and assistant to George W. Walker, is the chief designer of the Mercury. He explains that in designing a car, he must consider not only what the American public wants but also management's bottom line, since a complete body and chassis change costs the company $75 million. Because of automotive competition, Bordinat can not show forthcoming models, but he does display some "dream cars," such as the XM Turnpike Cruiser and the Taj Mahal, which are impractical to produce but which offer design features applicable to practical cars. He enumerates the steps in creating new models from design to production, including engineering, manufacturing, financing, and safety considerations. A film shows the Ford assembly line and testing labs. Bordinat shows a typical 3/8 scale clay model of the XM Turnpike Cruiser and discusses its design features and proportions. His design ideas come from observing various shapes, and he applies them to auto styling, such as elements of a B-52 bomber appearing as impact units (bumpers) on the Cruiser. Prospective stylists should like automobiles and study art at a school such as the Cleveland Institute of Art. In conclusion Mr. Poole asks Mr. Bordinat to envision cars of the future, which he describes
Man going up( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole interviews Dr. S. Fred Singer, associate professor of physics at University of Maryland, scientific consultant on U.S. Air Force's FARSIDE project, and father of the earliest practical satellite, MOUSE (Minimal Orbital Unmanned Satellite). Dr. Singer lists the primary contributors to propulsion: Newton, Tsiolkovsky, Oberth, and Goddard. He explains that the technical aspects of a rocket include propulsion, guidance, payload, and reentry. Currently chemical propulsion systems are used to launch rockets, but other propulsion systems, such as iron, photon, fusion, and fission, are being studied. Dr. Singer sketches a diagram to explain how gravitational pull and velocity make a satellite orbit and notes that a velocity greater than seven miles per second results in "escape velocity" and non-return of the satellite. The purpose of basic research, he says, is to train young people, such as the University of Maryland students who designed and built Terrapin and Oriole rockets
The Mathematician( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

James Braddock, an actuary and second vice president with New York Life Insurance Co., notes that there are only 900 fully qualified actuaries in the United States. He then explains how insurance is based on the mathematics of probability, the ratio of favorable ways over total ways, and demonstrates this concept with dice and poker hands. This applies to the actuary's responsibility of underwriting life insurance for people with hazardous jobs or high health risks. Such a career is a planning and administrative job requiring knowledge and judgment. Dr. Kelso Morrill, an associate professor of math at Johns Hopkins University, describes pure mathematics as the ability to think logically in abstract terms, but one also needs patience, enthusiasm, and creativity to teach it. He explains and compares the decimal and binary systems of counting. The binary system was introduced by the German mathematician Leibniz and is now the basis for computer calculations. Dr. Lewis Fulton, an applied mathematician, discusses the IBM high-speed computer's mathematical functions and decision logic. Even with the programming language FORTRAN (formula translation), a computer must still receive instructions or a program from a live mathematician in order to process information. A film shows a computer receiving binary-coded information from typed punch cards and storing it on magnetic tape, as for the Social Security Administration's records. Lynn Poole concludes the program by reiterating the opportunities in all areas of math
Human relations( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

During the Great Depression of the early 1930's the McCormick Company made a commitment to its employees to raise salaries, reduce working hours, develop a profit sharing plan and provide other benefits to improve morale and thus production. Employees need to receive recognition and participate in management decisions. The personnel manager is involved with recruiting, selection, hiring, training, progress appraisal, wage determination, morale, counseling, grievance negotiation, working conditions, and benefit programs. It is important to develop leaders for tomorrow who understand human relations in the field of personnel management, which involves psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics
The Human brain by Bonnie Roberts Benesh( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Neurological surgeon Walker explains that the brain is composed of neurons, nerve cells that convey impulses to various parts of the body and store memory of impulses. He shows a diagram of the dendrites and axons of the neurons and explains a cross-section model of a neuron. Lynn Poole lists some of the history of the research on brain functions, including that of the early German phrenologist Franz Joseph Gall. In 1817 it was demonstrated that electrical stimulus applied to the brain produced movement on the opposite side of the brain, giving rise to the existence of motor areas of the brain. Using a brain cross-section diagram related to various parts of the body, Dr. Walker shows how the sensory cortex, or homunculus, is closely correlated with the motor cortex. He also discusses what happens when these areas are injured and how they affect vision, hearing, and speech. The association area of the brain is the temporal lobe. Personality and drive may be located in the frontal lobe as lobotomies in that area produce personality change and induce apathy. Additional research is needed to discover if patterns of pathways between nerve cells are responsible for psychological differences
Man in America( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole shows a chart of epochs and notes that man didn't appear until the Pleistocene period. Dr. George Carter, department chair and professor of geography at Johns Hopkins University, discusses the possibility of a land bridge from Siberia to Alaska across the Bering Strait, based on human tools found with mastodon remains. Likewise, zoologist R.G. Gilmore has discovered that animals crisscrossed the Bering Strait between ice periods. In describing the history of the study of pre-history, Dr. Carter names W.H. Holmes and Ales Hrdlicka as men who led the opposition to the previously generally accepted belief in the existence of a glacial age man in America. With Willard F. Libby's 1951 discovery that all living things contain radioactive carbon, remains could be dated, challenging previous beliefs. From evidence such as stone tools, Dr. Carter speculates that man entered America about 40,000 years ago. He creates a timeline based on the degree of skill in making tools, the degree of weathering on tools, and the date of the existence of the lake where the tools were found. Dr. Carter also discusses physical geography and carbon-14 dating of tools along the southern California coast. Using charts and photos, he shows how reading California river valley records also yields data about sea level, climate, and glaciers. In the controversial Texas Street site in San Diego, Dr. Carter claims he has discovered hearths, crude stone tools, and dart points corresponding to the last interglacial period
Birth of a flame( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dr. Olsen, one of the team of scientists from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, briefly discusses the history of fire. He explains the zones and structure of a candle's flame and uses the Schlieren system of photography to detect the density gradients in the rising gas. Capt. Gayhart discusses the study of early spark-ignited flames, and he diagrams the operation of the Schlieren system. Mr. Edmondson shows three films of a flame's development in a stream of combustible gas taken at 100,000, 20 million, and 200 million frames per second
 
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Languages
English (24)