WorldCat Identities

Chaseman, Joel

Overview
Works: 147 works in 153 publications in 1 language and 188 library holdings
Genres: History 
Classifications: LB1609.S35, 507
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Joel Chaseman
 
Most widely held works by Joel Chaseman
Rh factor( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1939 the presence of the Rh factor was discovered to be in the blood of a large majority of human beings. This explains the some of the problems in pregancy and childbirth when a father is Rh positive and the mother is Rh negative, which can cause hemolytic disease of newborns
Man will conquer space( Visual )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this third in a series of programs on space exploration, Dr. Wernher von Braun, rocket expert, explains and demonstrates a three-stage rocket and its role in the construction of a three-story space station, which will be a launch pad for trips to the moon. He shows viewers both a prototype space station model and moon rocket model and an animated version of the workings of the two
Highlights in review( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Host Lynn Poole reviews highlights of programs from the past year: "Freezing the Atom" (10/10/50) shows how atoms are slowed down and the development of the bolometer; "Electronics at Work in a Vacuum"(10/25/50) describes the development of the vacuum tube and the principles behind it, using puffed wheat in a jar as an example; "Your Questions About Science" (12/26/50) explains and demonstrates atomic chain reaction or nuclear fission using mouse traps and sugar cubes; "The Unbreakable Laws of the Universe" (1/2/51) explains the physical laws governing all things: inertia, action and equal reaction, conservation of motion, gravity, and atmospheric pressure; "Fight Against Polio" (1/16/51) filmed at the Children's Hospital in Baltimore, MD, shows how polio victims are being strengthened and restored to a normal life; "Don't Take Your Heart for Granted" (2/13/51) describes what the heart is, what can happen to it, and how to take care of it; "Archaeology: Key to the Past" (3/13/51) looks at the work of archaeologists and their study of the lost civilization of the Etruscans; "Cancer Will Be Conquered" (4/10/51) features Dr. Gey describing the differences between normal and cancerous cells and showing a magnified, live view of the separation of normal and abnormal human cells; "Is There Science in Art?" (2/27/51) reveals the science of cleaning varnish and dirt from old paintings at the Walters Art Gallery and the art of using x-rays and ultraviolet light to restore old paintings to their original intent. Poole also thanks the studio staff and mentions other favorite programs: "Fear" (103/50), "X-Ray, the Super Sleuth" (12/5/50), "Stream Pollution" (5/1/51), "Don't Drink That Water" (3/20/51), "Schistosomiasis" (11/21/50), and "Magnificent Microscope" (5/15/51)
News from the sky( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explorations of the upper atmosphere are made through telemetering or the measuring of remote objects from afar. Rockets take these measuring devices into the upper atmosphere to measure cosmic ray intensity, fuel consumption, oil pressure, air speed, altitude, and the magnitude of the earth's magnetic field. Receivers on earth will retrieve the measurements transmitted from space through a radio link. Current uses of this information aid in the development of guided missiles
The peaceful atom( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this second program in a three-part series on peacetime uses of atomic energy, Lynn Poole demonstrates how radioactive iodine has been collected in a woman's thyroid for diagnosing goiter. An animated film shows the differences in size, shape, and stability of various atoms, the unstable ones being labelled radioactive isotopes. Dr. Bugher, of the Atomic Energy Commission, claims that the use of nuclear energy has advanced medicine by 25 years. For example, radioactive isotopes can be used to study the actual functioning and behavior of plants and animals, to trace and diagnose diseases such as thyroid problems, and to treat and cure diseases such as polycythemia, a form of cancer. He also demonstrates a thulium x-ray unit and narrates a short film showing cobalt-60 radiation of a patient with cancer. Gamma radiation is compact, reliable, and intense. Dr. Bugher notes that cesium, separated from the waste of atomic reactors, is a useful source of radiation. commercial electrical power. Dr. Hafstad, Director of the Reactor Development Division of AEC, discusses the costs and problems of harnessing atomic power. He points out that although our coal and oil supplies are dwindling and uranium supplies are vast, the cost of generating power from the atom is currently prohibitive. However, he predicts that, within the next five to fifteen years, as nuclear power is developed, its costs will fall
The science of toys( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is an updated production of a program originally broadcast two years earlier, entitled "Science of toys." Lynn Poole points out that over 1,400 different toys are now manufactured for learning and sportsmanship. He visits a studio toy shop with local child Joey Vitale where "shopkeeper" John Lockwood explains the science of such toys as slinky pull trains, punching bags, gear toys, a helicopter launcher, an electric airplane and steam engine, wind-up toys, and cog-driven toys. The trio also looks at how flexible plastics are now used to make some toys safer and dolls softer. They consider polarization in magnets, static electricity in balloons, ball bearings in bike wheels, and how toys were invented. Kits on the shelf include a chemistry set, a super sleuth science kit, and a weatherman set
Dividends of science( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A film produced by the U.S. Navy lists some recent defense research with benefits to civilians: raising research animals in sterile conditions; discovering unknown properties of metals by super heating and super cooling; researching man's reactions to motion; studying nuclear collisions and cosmic rays as alternative sources of power; creating heat with aluminum solar reflectors; studying solar chromosphere and solar activity; and developing computers, the cyclotron, fluid dynamics, surgical techniques, etc. A film by the U.S. Air Force then shows the by-products of their research: rayon and nylon tires, fiber A weather resistant fabric, stereoscopic strip camera for mapping large areas quickly, electric blankets and space heaters, and ground control approach (GCA) used at airports. The final message is that defense research and engineering funds pay dividends by providing improvements in daily living
Living together( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dr. Whitehorn briefly discusses the roles of the psychiatrist and the social worker and notes that the psychiatric clinic is like a lab of human nature. Dr. Frank, a psychiatrist, and Ms. Slaughter, a psychiatric social worker, then interact with actors to dramatize three actual cases: a family's conflict, an individual's depression, and an adolescent's problems. They conclude that the problems of living are common and solvable
Can we predict elections?( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Most pollsters incorrectly predicted the 1948 United States presidential election. Political scientists try to determine political trends in the U.S. by tracking the party affiliation of the House of Representatives. Local and regional differences can be seen by analyzing election results over the years. Most states show trends that mirror overall national results. Analysis of these factors can help predict future elections
The Johns Hopkins science review( Visual )

1 edition published in 1952 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Presented on TV network fifty-two weeks each year, this program is a weekly half-hour demonstration of current developments in today's science. Covering all sciences from astrophysics to zoology, this program is presented for the general layman who wishes to learn more about science, for school children and for the many teachers who use the program as an adjunct to classroom teaching. It is presented by eminent scientists, factually and simply, yet done in an entertaining manner."--1952 Peabody Digest. This episode, which aired on WABD-TV, New York, Channel 5, is the 178th show and is the first of three programs about how "man will conquer space."
The turning point( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

G.K. Green, a senior physicist at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, N.Y., discusses the cosmotron, an atom smasher made possible by the Atomic Energy Commission and operated by nine universities, including Johns Hopkins. Mr. Green first explains that carbon atoms form charcoal and diamonds and that the nucleus of carbon consists of half neutrons and half protons. He then shows a model of a ring-shaped cyclotron, a slice of the magnet and vacuum chamber within, and a film of the actual machine in operation. A Van de Graaff generator, a particle accelerator, shoots protons into the vacuum chamber of the magnet, and they build up speed with each rotation up to 4 million revolutions per second. At 180,000 miles per second, the protons collide with a target resulting in mesons, medium weight particles. Mr. Green also shows a film of a cloud chamber in which atomic particles leave vapor trails. He says the purpose of the cosmotron is to probe the center of the atom
A hospital never sleeps( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This program is a behind-the-scenes film featuring the people and activities at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 9:00 PM and 9:00 AM. Lad Grapski, assistant director of administrative services at the hospital, discusses the various roles of the hospital staff: guards, accountants, switchboard operators, cleaning crew, and maintenance men. Electrician Vincent Tomasetti demonstrates his procedure in making an electrical repair in the operating room of the Halsted Clinic. Pediatrician Dr. Thomas Reichelderzfer represents the professionals at the Harriet Lane Home children's hospital. Members of the emergency accident room staff include the registrar, x-ray technician, operating room nurses, and surgeons. In the obstetrics ward of the Women's Clinic, nurses tend to newborn babies. Cook Waverly Jennings notes that the hospital's food staff prepares 4,200 meals a day for patients and employees. Dr. Harry L. Chant, assistant director for professional services, comments on other continuous hospital functions, such as preparing for skin grafts or other surgeries
Da Vinci, man of science( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Leonardo da Vinci first developed the odometer for measuring distance, the jack for lifting heavy objects, and the pile driver. He did not have modern power sources or advanced mathematics, but used his remarkable intuition and observation to make many scientific discoveries including: gears, cutting tools, lathes, bridge trusses, clocks, sawmills and hydraulics. Excerpts from the film Leonardo da Vinci from Pictura Films Corporation are shown, highlighting the many artistic and scientific developments from his notebooks including models of flying machines, catapults, cannons, guns, and tanks
In all weather, radar( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This film provided by the British Information Service details the developmental history of marine radar. The creation of a plan position indicator (PPI), or radar output display, made shipborne radar possible. In 1946, the minimum requirements for radar equipment were established at an international meeting in London. A year later, the international standard for marine radar, built to withstand sea-going conditions, was set. This navigational aid saves time, money, and often lives. A ship entering the harbor of St. John, New Brunswick, Canada is shown using radar to navigate in the fog
Where does it begin?( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A history of basic research is presented, beginning with Dr. Ira Remson, the first professor of organic chemistry at Johns Hopkins University and his research into the atomic nature of matter and isotopes. Some important findings occur by accident like the discovery of saccharine. Pure research can have far reaching applications to make the practical discoveries of tomorrow
Medical science at home & abroad( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

After an introduction by Sir Roger Makins, British ambassador, British TV producer and moderator Andrew Miller Jones discusses the association between Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Guy's Hospital in London. A film describes each of these teaching hospitals and how they have been connected through exchange of information, ideas, and faculty since 1946. Two of Johns Hopkins Hospital's recent developments are demonstrated by faculty: Dr. Francis Schwentker's humidified oxygen tent, and Dr. Russell Morgan's televised x-rays. Detlev W. Bronk, president of the Johns Hopkins University delivered an address on Anglo-American cooperation in the many fields of scientific research
Making light behave( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Beams of light can be controlled by polarization, by rotating polaroid filters to focus or block out light. Cross polarizer filters can eliminate car headlight glare at night, and reduce reflection on camera lenses, microscopes, compasses for polar navigation, and the brightness of white paper. Sunglasses also use polaroid lenses that aid drivers by cutting down on pavement glare
It's a fact( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole opens the program by summarizing a letter from viewers who are members of the Science Club at Monclair State Teachers' College in New Jersey. Baltimore Polytechnic Institute teacher Malcolm Davies proves that perpetual motion does not exist. The device purporting it is actually a Crookes' radiometer that merely demonstrates the facts of radiation. Davies then discusses the navigational issues confronting Columbus and his sailors, such as the differences in distances from the magnetic poles to the actual poles and the strength of the tradewinds. Poole exhibits a copy of "The Story of Maps", written by Peabody librarian Lloyd A. Brown, which mentions an astrolabe, like that used by Columbus. Davies displays an astrolabe and shows how it's used in conjunction with the north star for navigation. He also demonstrates Gunter's quadrant and a marine sextant. The camera views through the sextant eyepiece as Davies makes adjustments, allowing viewers to experience its operation. Finally, using several examples, Davies explains Bernoulli's Principle, which occurs when vehicles at high velocity pass on roads and atmospheric pressure appears to push them together. Lynn Poole concludes the program by announcing that the current "Look" magazine has a preview of the next program, "Troubled People Meet."
The Johns Hopkins science review( Visual )

1 edition published in 1951 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"A weekly half-hour television program produced by the staff at the Johns Hopkins University, originated by WAAM in Baltimore, and carried by approximately 20 stations, coast to coast, of the DuMont Network. It is dedicated to the factual, authentic exposition of the facts of medical and technological life affecting the American family."--1951 Peabody Digest. This episode, which aired on WABD, New York, Channel 5, is about aeronautical history and features aerial photographs taken from the Aerobee sounding rocket developed by engineers at the Applied Physics lab at Johns Hopkins in conjunction with the U.S. Navy and designed by the Douglas Aircraft Company
Don't take your heart for granted( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The program opens with the TV Guide citation and medal awarded to The Johns Hopkins Science Review, the first university program on the air, for its outstanding educational programming. Mortimer Loewi, Director of the DuMont Network; Kenneth Carter, general station manager of WAAM; and P. Stewart Macaulay, provost of The Johns Hopkins University, express thanks to TV Guide and pay tribute to the scientists who make the shows possible. Dr. John Spence demonstrates heart percussion, developed in 1761 by L. Auenbrugger, to outline the position and shape of the heart, which can now be done by x-ray. Dr. Francis Schwentker uses a model of the heart and a water pump to demonstrate heart activity and uses diagrams of the heart to explain the route of blood circulation, which is also shown on a human model. With the use of the heart model and diagrams, Dr. Schwentker explains the problems caused by congenital heart malformations (and the blue baby operation by Drs. Taussig and Blalock to correct it), rheumatic fever, high blood pressure, and coronary heart disease. He then demonstrates how the heart functions are studied with percussion and x-ray, stethoscope, blood pressure monitoring, electrocardiogram, heart catheters, and angiograms. Finally Dr. Schwentker notes the different ways heart problems are being prevented. An ad at the end of the show encourages viewers to contribute to their local heart fund during Heart Month
 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.36 (from 0.10 for Rh factor ... to 0.82 for The Johns ...)

Languages
English (28)