WorldCat Identities

Dahlstrom, Eric L.

Overview
Works: 4 works in 6 publications in 1 language and 4 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: U412.J1,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Eric L Dahlstrom
Engaging the Hermit Kingdom: A Comprehensive Strategy Toward North Korea( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent revelations that North Korea has maintained its nuclear weapon program in violation of prior international agreements highlight the adversarial relationship between Washington and Pyongyang. For 50 years, American foreign policy has tried to co-opt or shun North Korea, usually without success. Prior U.S. attempts at engagement have been halfhearted at best, often being nothing more than an opportunity for Pyongyang to extract concessions from the West. The United States should re-evaluate its approach toward North Korea and implement a comprehensive and integrated strategy that offers tangible incentives for cooperation backed by substantial costs for non-compliance. Such a strategy is presented in part one of this paper. U.S. objectives toward North Korea are identified and prioritized; the effectiveness of diplomatic, economic, information, and military means toward North Korea are presented; and a plan for implementing these options is developed. Part two assumes that peaceful options for attaining U.S. goals in North Korea fail and that Washington must resort to military force. Capabilities, constraints, and goals of the antagonists are identified and assumptions made about their likely courses of action. From this framework a military strategy is presented that provides a viable alternative for the United States
Homespun and Microchips: India's Economic Dichotomy( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

India is a study in contrasts. It is a nation that produces nuclear weapons and launches sophisticated satellites into geosynchronous earth orbit, yet 260 million (26%) of its citizens live beneath the official poverty line. India's universities annually graduate thousands of the most talented scientists in the world, but the country's literacy rate is an appalling 52%. As in most countries, India is experiencing growing urbanization and budding industrialization, yet 70% of its workers still make their livelihood from agriculture. India is essentially two countries, one striving to become a world power and another deeply mired in the past. Depending on where one looks, an observer will see the India of microchips and high technology, or the India of Mohandas Gandhi and Mother Theresa. In the early 1950s, India was described as an emerging economic power. Fifty years later the country is still trying to live up to that label. Upon gaining its independence in 1947, India's leaders decided to use the power of the state to direct economic growth and reduce widespread poverty. The public sector controlled heavy industry, transportation, and telecommunications, while the private sector produced most consumer goods, but with heavy government regulation and oversight. India emphasized self-sufficiency rather than foreign trade and investment and imposed strict controls on imports, exports, and foreign ownership. This system initially produced significant economic growth, but by the 1960s this progress began to atrophy under the inefficiencies of socialist policies. Deficit spending throughout the 1970s and 80s brought on a balance-of-payments crisis in 1991. In order to receive an economic bailout by the International Monetary Fund, the ruling Congress Party opted to jettison its command economic policies and institute liberal reforms
From reconnaissance to surveillance : intelligence transformation in the new millennium by Eric L Dahlstrom( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bruce Berkowitz The vehicle moved steadily along a dusty road 175 kilometers east of the capital city of Sana'a. The American pilot received permission to engage and, peering at his video screen, centered the crosshairs of his Hellfire missile directly over the target. A few moments later, the sedan carrying six al-Qaeda terrorists dissolved into a mass of fire and debris. What makes this mission unique compared to the thousands of others flown during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM is that this pilot is not a military officer. In fact, the CIA pilot is not even aboard his aircraft, a 1,500-pound Predator drone. He is "flying" this mission from a command trailer located hundreds of miles from the battlefield. This one event represents a major turning point in America's military evolution. It highlights the changing nature of the threat to the United States and showcases the emerging capabilities required to successfully defend our country in the new millennium. Transnational terrorist groups, willing to conduct suicide missions and eager to obtain weapons of mass destruction, pose a difficult problem for militaries geared to combat conventional foes. Because groups such as al-Qaeda operate in the midst of civilian populations and strike non-military targets, it is nearly impossible to defend the homeland without drastically changing our way of life. As such, the new National Security Strategy proposes that the United States not wait to be attacked, but should preempt terrorist groups before they can strike. The American military will need specific and timely intelligence if it is going to take the fight to the terrorists. The intelligence community, in turn, must significantly change the way it processes information and move from a collection paradigm dominated by reconnaissance to one geared toward persistent surveillance on demand
Intelligence and law enforcement : bridging the cultural divide by Eric L Dahlstrom( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On November 19, 2002, the United States Congress passed the Homeland Security Bill launching the largest government reorganization since the creation of the Defense Department in 1947. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will fold 170,000 employees from 22 agencies into a new organization charged with the responsibility of shoring up the nation's defenses against terrorism. 2 A critical mission of this new organization will be analyzing and promulgating information on terrorist threats to the government and people of the United States. To be successful, the DHS must fuse information provided by national-level intelligence organizations with that from federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies (LEAs). Given the importance of this new mission, what insights can we glean from previous intelligence-law enforcement cooperation efforts? A good example would be the military's entrance into the war on drugs during the late 1980s. Experience gained from this campaign indicates that the DHS will have to overcome significant cultural and organizational hurdles in managing information on terrorist threats. Despite numerous setbacks, the war on drugs did produce cases where cooperation between national-level intelligence and law enforcement organizations led to success. Will the Department of Homeland Security learn the right lessons from the war on drugs or is it destined to make the same mistakes?
 
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