WorldCat Identities

Jaffee, Ted

Overview
Works: 134 works in 137 publications in 1 language and 137 library holdings
Genres: Educational films  Short films  Juvenile works  Children's films  History  Music  Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Sermons 
Classifications: Z665.5, 020.23
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ted Jaffee
Highlights in review( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Host Lynn Poole reviews highlights of programs from the past year: "Freezing the Atom" (10/10/50) shows how atoms are slowed down and the development of the bolometer; "Electronics at Work in a Vacuum"(10/25/50) describes the development of the vacuum tube and the principles behind it, using puffed wheat in a jar as an example; "Your Questions About Science" (12/26/50) explains and demonstrates atomic chain reaction or nuclear fission using mouse traps and sugar cubes; "The Unbreakable Laws of the Universe" (1/2/51) explains the physical laws governing all things: inertia, action and equal reaction, conservation of motion, gravity, and atmospheric pressure; "Fight Against Polio" (1/16/51) filmed at the Children's Hospital in Baltimore, MD, shows how polio victims are being strengthened and restored to a normal life; "Don't Take Your Heart for Granted" (2/13/51) describes what the heart is, what can happen to it, and how to take care of it; "Archaeology: Key to the Past" (3/13/51) looks at the work of archaeologists and their study of the lost civilization of the Etruscans; "Cancer Will Be Conquered" (4/10/51) features Dr. Gey describing the differences between normal and cancerous cells and showing a magnified, live view of the separation of normal and abnormal human cells; "Is There Science in Art?" (2/27/51) reveals the science of cleaning varnish and dirt from old paintings at the Walters Art Gallery and the art of using x-rays and ultraviolet light to restore old paintings to their original intent. Poole also thanks the studio staff and mentions other favorite programs: "Fear" (103/50), "X-Ray, the Super Sleuth" (12/5/50), "Stream Pollution" (5/1/51), "Don't Drink That Water" (3/20/51), "Schistosomiasis" (11/21/50), and "Magnificent Microscope" (5/15/51)
Archaeologist( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole describes what archaeologists do and why. Dr. William F. Albright explains how to determine the age of an object by datable style and carbon-14 testing. He then shows slides and diagrams of the Hajar bin Humeid mounds in south Arabia. As authenticator of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Dr. Albright discusses authentication methods for writings and scripts, such as comparing changes in the Hebrew alphabet and dated documents of the same period. Lastly, he describes qualities required for becoming an archaeologist
Librarian by Haunted Love (Musical group)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland is shown as a good example of a large urban public library system. Acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and reference functions are discussed as librarians and other library staff help patrons. James Dickson, a librarian at the Pratt Library, says that libraries contain much more than books as he shows maps, films, records and other materials. He talks about his educational background and what led him into librarianship. A good general college education followed by a masters degree in library science is needed to beome a librarian
The great awakening( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Johns Hopkins University president Milton S. Eisenhower introduces this program about the Fund for Adult Education, an independent philanthropic organization sponsored by the Ford Foundation to extend liberal education to adults. He explains that as a society becomes more complex, its need for good leaders increases. Charles H. Percy, president of the Bell & Howell Co. and chairman of the board for the Fund, describes leadership in the United States and public responsibility of its citizens. He points out that particularly because we now have the power to destroy ourselves, the future of society depends on the effectiveness of key people in organizations' leadership roles. The president of the Fund, C. Scott Fletcher, says that leadership comes from a multiple, fluid society, offering a constant supply of fresh people with new ideas. A short film shows how uneducated leaders in a village are unable to meet the challenge of change and take a long-range view. Harry A. Bullis, director of the Fund, explains that leadership training is available to Armed Forces staff and at most private organizations, but top government employees only receive on the job training via trial and error, often at the public's expense. The Fund intends to prepare such individuals for public responsibilities. President of Vassar College and vice-chair of the Fund's board Sarah Gibson Blanding describes leadership in Thomas Jefferson's days and how it developed as society became more complex. While there are opportunities for many types of training, adult leadership training is lacking. She reiterates that continuing liberal adult education is necessary. Leaders must be educated to be dedicated, courageous, and imaginative. Mr. Percy concludes that the threat of Soviet Russia and its success with communism will exist for a long time, so we must educate our leaders as efficiently as they do theirs. He suggests non-commercial educational television as a possible education vehicle. In closing, Lynn Poole offers a free copy of the Fund's booklet "The Great Awakening" to the viewing audience
Little known metals( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Little known metals with valuable applications are discussed. Titanium being much lighter than steel has important military applications; vitalium, an alloy of cobalt, chromium and molybdenum, is used to join and strengthen bones; tantalum is used in skull plates; mercury has many applications including: lipsticks, television vacuum tubes, antiseptics, insecticides, and photograhic developing; selenium is used in light meters and to conduct electricity; cerium emits sparks and is used in cigarette lighters; germanium is used to make transistors, which can replace vacuum tubes in the telephone, radio, and television industries
Singing statues( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Johns Hopkins University chemistry professor John H. Andrews demonstrates that all matter vibrates in harmonic wave patterns. He begins by using an oscilloscope and slow motion camera to show a plucked harp string's fundamental vibration at 64 times per second and its harmonics at a faster vibration. He compares this with the two-dimensional vibration of a drum membrane, also viewed on the slow motion camera and oscilloscope. Dr. Andrews then progresses to the three-dimensional wavelength of a sphere and notes that different and more complex harmonic patterns are based on the shape of the object. Since no two statues are alike, their wave patterns are all unique, as evidenced when a gadget taps them repetitively and their sound is recorded on magnetic tape. Dr. Andrews slows the tape to hear specific sounds and compares this to slowing a LP record on a record player from high speed to the proper speed to make the words recognizable. He explains that the aggregate vibration of the whole statue is based on its external shape, like atomic and molecular vibration. He points out that the formula for entropy, the measurement of the complexity of harmonic pattern, is the same as the formula for information theory, the measurement of the amount of information in a communication. Thus, a statue has high information value because its complex external shape gives it a high shape entropy and it communicates more meaning. This concept has implications for the communication values of modern v. classical art
The deep ship( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The program opens with drawings of early, primitive underwater vessels and segues into a film of swimmers with aqualungs. A photo of Charles William Beebe is shown as oceanographer Dayton Carritt discusses Beebe's 1930s bathysphere. In 1953, Auguste Piccard built the first bathyscaphe, the "Trieste," a 50-foot untethered underwater vehicle, after many years of successfully using balloons to study the atmosphere. The "Trieste" operates on the Archimedes principle of water displacement, demonstrated by Dr. Carritt by dropping a tennis ball and a golf ball into water. Dr. Carritt explains in detail a schematic diagram of the "Trieste," showing how the ballast mechanism works with a small experiment and film clip of the procedure. In 1958, the Office of Naval Research bought the "Trieste" from Piccard for $185,000 to study the physical, chemical, biological, and geological characteristics of the ocean. Dr. Carritt interviews Dr. Robert Dietz of the U.S. Navy, who recounts his dive in "Trieste" with Piccard, describing what he saw and how he felt. Dr. Dietz also explains the "false bottom" or "deep scattering layer" and shows a graph of it. He discusses the drawbacks and the uses of bathyscaphes, such as deep sea salvage, mineral mining, and cable monitoring
Where does it begin?( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A history of basic research is presented, beginning with Dr. Ira Remson, the first professor of organic chemistry at Johns Hopkins University and his research into the atomic nature of matter and isotopes. Some important findings occur by accident like the discovery of saccharine. Pure research can have far reaching applications to make the practical discoveries of tomorrow
Men who changed the world( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Nicolaus Copernicus took issue with early astronomers such as Ptolemy, who wrote the "Almgest," a catalog of the motions of the planets and position of stars based on his use of an astrolabe. Costumed actors portraying Copernicus and his pupil Rheticus discuss astronomical theories and question the prevailing belief in the epicycles of planets in an earth-centered universe. However, their work was criticized by the church, including Martin Luther who considered the concept of the earth revolving and rotating to be "ludicrous." Danish astronomer Tyco Brahe combined the best findings from both Ptolemy and Copernicus, but did not accept the latter's heliocentric universe. Rheticus, however, wrote about that theory in his "First Account." Copernicus died in 1543, as his "Concerning the Revolution" was being published. Giordano Bruno defended the Copernican heliocentric theory and was tried as a heretic and burned at the stake
The geophysical patient( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole summarizes some of the fourteen areas of activities taking place during the International Geophysical Year (IGY), 7/1/57 - 12/30/58: aurora and airglow, cosmic rays, geomagnetism, meteorology, solar activity, glaciography, gravity, ionospherics, longitude and latitude, oceanography, rocketry, satellites, seismology, and world days. IGY was timed to coincide with the high point of the eleven-year cycle of sunspot activity. A few of the highlights include Dr. William Markowitz's Moon Camera for measuring precise time, the use of the sea gravimeter to record changes in the earth's gravity, Dr. Harry Wexler's U.S. expedition to Antarctica to study atmospheric circulation and other meteorological phenomena, a recording of "whistlers" or low frequency radio signals caused by lightning flashes, John Simpson's study of primary and secondary cosmic rays, the use of the Baker-Nunn satellite tracking camera, and Dr. James Van Allen's Explorer I orbiting satellite
Automotive stylist( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole rides into the program in a Model T Ford, followed by a Thunderbird. Guest Gene Bordinat, vice president of Ford Motor Co. in charge of styling and assistant to George W. Walker, is the chief designer of the Mercury. He explains that in designing a car, he must consider not only what the American public wants but also management's bottom line, since a complete body and chassis change costs the company $75 million. Because of automotive competition, Bordinat can not show forthcoming models, but he does display some "dream cars," such as the XM Turnpike Cruiser and the Taj Mahal, which are impractical to produce but which offer design features applicable to practical cars. He enumerates the steps in creating new models from design to production, including engineering, manufacturing, financing, and safety considerations. A film shows the Ford assembly line and testing labs. Bordinat shows a typical 3/8 scale clay model of the XM Turnpike Cruiser and discusses its design features and proportions. His design ideas come from observing various shapes, and he applies them to auto styling, such as elements of a B-52 bomber appearing as impact units (bumpers) on the Cruiser. Prospective stylists should like automobiles and study art at a school such as the Cleveland Institute of Art. In conclusion Mr. Poole asks Mr. Bordinat to envision cars of the future, which he describes
A quintet concert( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Members of the Baltimore Woodwinds, first chair or principle players with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, open the program playing the finale of "Quintet in E-flat major" by Anton Reicha. Lynn Poole describes the history of woodwind music and introduces the players: Britton Johnson on flute, Wayne Rapier on oboe, Robert Pierce on French horn, Stanley Petrulis on bassoon, and Ignatius Gennusa on clarinet. The quintet plays two movements of Vivaldi's "Sonata in G minor" and continues with "Pastoral," by modern composer Vincent Persichetti. Last in their repertoire are three short pieces for woodwind composed by Jacques Ibert
Railroad engineer( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chester Henry, assistant chief engineer in charge of construction for the Pennsylvania Railroad, discusses railroad facelifting for both trains and tracks. He comments that a railroad is never complete because of its responsibility to change in industry. Mr. Henry explains the car classification operation at Conway Yard near Pittsburgh, and a film further elaborates on the process, including the role of the hump conductor. Railroad engineers must see the overall picture to construct a line with minimum cost and maximum efficiency. For example, they must find the best route by using aerial photography. Film clips show techniques developed by engineers to unload shipments of foreign ore onto railroad cars. Electronic and mechanical engineers also develop new railway technology, such as track safety features; maintain rolling stock, as at the Hollidaysburg, PA freight car repair shop; and design experimental passenger cars, such as the stainless steel Budd cars and the GM Aerotrain. Carl Bergman notes that inspecting and maintaining track and allied structures acquaints railroad engineers in training with all aspects of the job, even though most maintenance jobs are now mechanized. He explains the composition and construction of a track and narrates a film showing a machine that detects defects in the rail and other maintenance equipment. Both men recommend that interested high school students take math and general science courses followed by a college degree in engineering. There are about 172 different railroad job classifications, including positions in the clerical and accounting departments for women
Where Are You? by Jonyrma S Burkette( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As historical background to 1959 Doppler radar navigation systems, an animated film considers the use of Ptolemy and Mercator's maps, the magnetic compass, and John Hadley's 1731 sextant. Clarence Rice, aviation products manager of the Bendix Radio Division in Baltimore, MD, points out that aviation navigation depends on knowing the ground speed and the path of the aircraft over the earth. He uses a chart to demonstrate the effects of winds on plane direction and the efforts to compensate: a homing device, which did not account for wind drift and also picked up static interference; the radio range system, which used four beams to overcome the drift problem but still received static; and the manual direction finder, which became the standard aid in the 1930s. A film describes how, in 1939, Bendix developed the automatic direction finder (ADF) with omnirange, which also eliminated static. Over the ocean, LORAN, or long range navigation, devices were used. Another animated film shows how Christian Doppler, in 1842, described the Doppler effect based on sound waves and how that principle has been applied to radar's radio waves. The film explains the "plus" Doppler effect for direct measurement of forward speeds and the "minus" for measurement of drift angle. Pitch and roll are also corrected by the radar beams since beam compensation is based on the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A plane's Doppler radar components include a transmitter, antennae, receiver, frequency tracker, and cockpit indicator. Mr. Rice explains how pilots divide their flights into shorter legs, placing the information into the navigational computer. He notes that Doppler radar will not become obsolete with faster aircraft speeds and that it does not require a land-based facility
Mystery of the Rongorongo( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dr. George Carter, geology professor at Johns Hopkins University, shows a "talking board" discovered in 1868 on Easter Island and discusses previous attempts to decipher its symbols, called rongorongo, as writing or decoration. A film clip of Byrd's expedition party visiting the stone statues on Easter Island sets the scene. Bishop Tepano Jaussen of Tahiti was the first person to investigate this mystery, and he ultimately published a dictionary of identified glyphs in 1898. He was followed by Thomas Crafts, who concluded that the symbols were just decorations; William J. Thomson, who attempted unsuccessfully to have a story board translated; Bishop Claessens, who reported that figures on an island in the Seychelles were similar to the rongorongo; Lacouperie, who discovered seals in south India similar to the Easter Island symbols; and, William Hevesy, who pointed out the similarities of seals excavated in the Indus Valley to forms on Easter Island
A hospital never sleeps( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This program is a behind-the-scenes film featuring the people and activities at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 9:00 PM and 9:00 AM. Lad Grapski, assistant director of administrative services at the hospital, discusses the various roles of the hospital staff: guards, accountants, switchboard operators, cleaning crew, and maintenance men. Electrician Vincent Tomasetti demonstrates his procedure in making an electrical repair in the operating room of the Halsted Clinic. Pediatrician Dr. Thomas Reichelderzfer represents the professionals at the Harriet Lane Home children's hospital. Members of the emergency accident room staff include the registrar, x-ray technician, operating room nurses, and surgeons. In the obstetrics ward of the Women's Clinic, nurses tend to newborn babies. Cook Waverly Jennings notes that the hospital's food staff prepares 4,200 meals a day for patients and employees. Dr. Harry L. Chant, assistant director for professional services, comments on other continuous hospital functions, such as preparing for skin grafts or other surgeries
Gifts without wrappings( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lynn Poole shows two children album pages of lasting gifts: the oldest hymn, "Gloria in Excelsis," inserted into Mass by Pope Telesphorus, sung by the Johns Hopkins Glee Club; the custom of Christmas cards, first designed by John Callcott Horsley at the request of his friend Henry Cole in 1843, and another card designed by W.M. Edgley; the story surrounding the composition of "Silent Night," with words by Father Joseph Mohr and music by Franz Gruber and sung by a duet; the history of the Christmas tree traced to Martin Luther; the development of Santa Claus by cartoonist Thomas Nast from Dr. Clement Moore's poem "A Visit from St. Nick"; the 1897 "Is there a Santa Claus" letter to "The New York Sun" and response from its editor Francis P. Church; the Welsh air "Deck the Halls" sung by a quartet; the Yule log custom; Johns Hopkins' President Milton S. Eisenhower's remarks on the significance of Christmas; and the composition of "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" with words by Charles Wesley
Elephants are where you find them( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dr. George Carter, professor of geography at the Johns Hopkins University, discusses elephant drawings as the key to the controversy of whether or not the American Indian civilization was influenced by European and Asian civilizations. Examples of elephant drawings made between 1500 B.C. and 500 A.D. in such diverse places as England, Ceylon, China, and Siam are often stylized or abstract whether the animal is native to the country or not. Similarly, a Greek coin displays an elephant likeness. However, during this period in Central America, Mayan statues, carvings, and writings and Aztec art and rituals distinctly show elephants even though there were none to copy nor anyone to describe them. Thus Dr. Carter maintains that Asian peoples must have brought drawings or statues of elephants to Central America over 2,000 years ago. The proof he offers for this theory is the Thor Heyerdahl transpacific raft voyage (proving such a trip could be made in a primitive vessel), identical temples 12,000 miles apart in Mexico and Cambodia, identical Sumatran and Mexican folding bark religious books, identical fishhooks from Easter Island and California, physical attributes of Central American and Asian Indians (photos show one of each, both playing nose flutes), and plants appearing in lands too far from original sources to have blown there. In closing, Lynn Poole shows additional examples of elephant artwork found in the United States
Red light for growth( Visual )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This program opens with a film of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Station in Beltsville, MD. In one greenhouse two groups of plants are receiving the same daytime conditions, but at night one is kept in total darkness while the other receives eight additional hours of incandescent light. Two four-year old loblolly pines show the results of this experiment. Dr. H.A. Borthwick explains that this is to study photoperiodism, or the effect of light on the plants' growth mechanism. In 1918 Wightman W. Garner and Harry A. Allard discovered that it is not the length of the day but rather of the night that is the determining factor in flower and seed production and growth of plants. Further experiments with lettuce, bean, tomato, and corn seeds test the effect of spectrum light colors and exposure on germination. A far red light creates a taller plant, and red light creates the tomato skin color. The mechanism in a plant the reacts to light is not chlorophyll but rather a two-way growth pigment, phytochrome, that acts as a switch with red and far red light. A film shows the process, using a spectrophotometer, by which this was determined. K.H. Norris demonstrates a spectrophotometer with a corn sample and explains the results with graphs. Two film clips show Sterling B. Hendricks doing further research on phytochromes to isolate their molecular structure and Soviet Prime Minister Nikita Khrushchev at Beltsville, MD listening to Dr. Borthwick discuss crop growth issues
Window of life( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chemical analysis of the key elements of plant and animal life, chlorophyll and hemoglobin is presented
 
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Languages
English (23)