WorldCat Identities

Levitan, Lee

Overview
Works: 11 works in 16 publications in 1 language and 59 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Lee Levitan
Drivers' activities and information needs in an automated highway system by Lee Levitan( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

These experiments investigated what drivers do when traveling under automated control, and what information they would like to have available during that time. Eighteen drivers ages 25 through 34 and 18 drivers age 65 or older participated in the first two experiments; 6 drivers participated in the third experiment. All experiments were conducted in the Iowa Driving Simulator. The driver drove the simulator vehicle onto a freeway and then moved to the center lane; following a period of manual driving, control was transferred to the AHS, and the driver traveled under automated control for at least 34 min. In the first two experiments, which were run together and consisted of a single trial for each driver, driver activities were videotaped for later analysis
Preliminary human factors guidelines for automated highway system designers( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preliminary human factors guidelines for automated highway system designers( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preliminary human factors guidelines for automated highway system designers( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preliminary human factors guidelines for automated highway system designers (second edition)( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human factors design of automated highway systems : preliminary results by Lee Levitan( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Using an automated speed, steering, and gap control system and a collision warning system when driving in clear visibility and fog by John Bloomfield( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"The effect on driving performance of using a speed, steering, and gap control system (SSGCS) and a collision warning system (CWS) was assessed in an experiment conducted in the Iowa Driving Simulator. Driving performance data were obtained from 52 drivers, 32 of whom drove with both systems and 20 controls who did not have access to either. Results were as follows: (1) Driving while using the SSGCS: When the driver was using the SSGCS, there was no effect on speed; however, the driver's car tended to follow further behind the vehicle ahead than did the control-group drivers. (2) Driving while using only the CWS: With the CWS engaged, drivers controlled both the speed and the steering more precisely than the control-group drivers. This may have occurred because the driver was paying more attention than normal to the driving task. When using the CWS alone, the driver's speed was greater than that of the control drivers--particularly in the 100-m (328-ft) fog. This may have occurred because the driver was testing the CWS. Use of the CWS alone had no effect on the following-distance measures. (3) Driving when the SSGCS and CWS were disengaged: When the driving performance of the experimental-group drivers, with both intelligent systems disengaged after the SSGCS had been activated at least once, was compared with that of the control-group drivers on steering instability, average velocity, and average actual gap, the results were mixed. There was no difference in minimum following distance between the experimental- and control-group drivers. The experimental-group drivers had more steering oscillations, making steering correction movements more frequently than the controls, but without changing their steering instability. They also reduced their velocity instability while increasing the number of velocity fluctuations. They were controlling speed more precisely than the controls, making more frequent corrections of smaller amplitude than the controls. These changes in driving performance may have occurred because the driver had to decide whether, and when, to use the SSGCS and CWS, and may have been paying much more attention than normal to the task of driving"--Technical report documentation page
Human factors design of automated highway systems by Lee Levitan( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The objective of the Human Factors Design of Automated Highway Systems contract was to provide input during the conceptual stages of AHS development on matters of human factors concern, and thereby affect the design and implementation of the AHS and lay the foundation for future AHS advancement. Parallel analytical and experimental tracks were conducted, with intentional cross-talk among the tasks on the two tracks. This report provides a review of the products from each task. Included for each task is the objective, the methodology, and the results. In addition, answers to questions asked during a particular task and answered based on findings from later work are given in the review for the task where the question was first asked. Also, where assumptions about the AHS made earlier in the research effort were changed because of new data or an evolution in thinking about the issue, those changes are presented along with their bases. The implications of findings for the design of the AHS are presented. A section on current concepts of the AHS presents descriptions of the AHS scenarios first developed in the first task but now modified to reflect the changed assumptions and other data findings
Human factors design of automated highway systems by Lee Levitan( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human factors issues for automated highway sytems by Lee Levitan( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Preliminary human factors guidelines for automated highway system designers (second edition)( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Human factors can be defined as "designing to match the capabilities and limitations of the human user." The objectives of this human-centered design process are to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of system performance, ensure a high level of safety, and maximize user acceptance. These objectives are achieved by systematically applying relevant information and principles about human abilities, characteristics, behavior, and limitations to specific design problems. This handbook provides a source document for automated highway system (AHS) designers that will facilitate a human-centered design process for the AHS. It is the second edition of these guidelines (first edition is FHWA-RD-94-116) and includes the addition of key AHS attributes proposed by the National Automated Highway System Consortium, updates to the chapter on general guidelines for electronic visual displays, and the addition of several operational guidelines (chapter 10)."--Technical report documentation page
 
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Audience level: 0.82 (from 0.78 for Using an a ... to 0.88 for Human fact ...)

Languages
English (16)