WorldCat Identities

Felter, Joseph

Overview
Works: 9 works in 11 publications in 1 language and 22 library holdings
Genres: Bibliography 
Classifications: BP182,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Joseph Felter Publications about Joseph Felter
Publications by  Joseph Felter Publications by Joseph Felter
Most widely held works by Joseph Felter
Militant ideology atlas research compendium ( )
2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
" ... An in-depth study of the Jihadi Movement's top thinkers and their most popular writings. This is the first systematic mapping of the ideology inspiring al-Qaeda. The CTC's researchers spent one year mining the most popular books and articles in al-Qaeda's online library, profiling hundreds of figures in the Jihadi Movement, and cataloging over 11,000 citations. The empirically supported findings of the project are surprising: The most influential Jihadi intellectuals are clerics from Jordan and Saudi Arabia, two of the US's closest allies in the Middle East. Among them, the Jordanian cleric Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi has had the most impact on other Jihadi thinkers and has been the most consequential in shaping the worldview of the Jihadi Movement. In contrast, the study finds that Usama Bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri have had little influence on other Jihadi theorists and strategists. The Research Compendium contains summaries of all the texts used in the study as well as biographies of the texts' authors and the figures they cite most."--CTC web site
Militant ideology atlas executive report ( )
2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
" ... An in-depth study of the Jihadi Movement's top thinkers and their most popular writings. This is the first systematic mapping of the ideology inspiring al-Qaeda. The CTC's researchers spent one year mining the most popular books and articles in al-Qaeda's online library, profiling hundreds of figures in the Jihadi Movement, and cataloging over 11,000 citations. The empirically supported findings of the project are surprising: The most influential Jihadi intellectuals are clerics from Jordan and Saudi Arabia, two of the US's closest allies in the Middle East. Among them, the Jordanian cleric Abu Muhammad al-Maqdisi has had the most impact on other Jihadi thinkers and has been the most consequential in shaping the worldview of the Jihadi Movement. In contrast, the study finds that Usama Bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri have had little influence on other Jihadi theorists and strategists. The Executive Report summarizes the main conclusions of this comprehensive effort and provides policy-relevant recommendations informed by these findings."--CTC web site
CTC Sentinel. Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2007. West Point Releases First Issue of CTC Sentinel ( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Combating Terrorism Center at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point is privileged to present the CTC Sentinel, a new monthly online journal devoted to understanding and confronting contemporary threats posed by terrorism, insurgency and other forms of political violence. The CTC Sentinel draws from the Center's network of scholars and practitioners dedicated to the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism to provide the most well-informed forum for the analysis of these most pressing security challenges facing the United States and its allies. The CTC Sentinel supports the Combating Terrorism Center's dual mission of educating a new generation of leaders and conducting objective, policy-relevant, informative and rigorous research of the highest standards geared both to the specialist and larger interested public
The Power of Truth: Questions for Ayman al-Zawahiri (Part 1) ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
On 16 December 2007, Ayman al-Zawahiri invited journalists and Jihadist enthusiasts to ask him questions via the primary Jihadist web forums. Zawahiri promised to personally answer some of those questions in a subsequent statement. On 2 April 2008, As-Sahab Media released the first part of Zawahiri's response in the form of a 1 hour, 43-minute audio statement, which was accompanied by Arabic and English transcripts. Zawahiri answered some questions directly, like whether al-Qa'ida's willingness to kill innocent Muslims in the course of their operations is apostasy. He sidestepped other questions, including more politicized ones about al-Qa'ida's increasing difficulties in Iraq and, in particular, al-Qa'ida's official position toward Iran. The following analysis of Zawahiri's Part I response is broken into three sections. The first evaluates the most important themes that Zawahiri addressed on 2 April, namely HAMAS, the killing of innocents, Yusuf al-Qaradawi and the Muslim Brotherhood, the Lebanese Jihadist group Fatah al-Islam, and Zawahiri's dispute with Sayyid Imam Sharif, the former Emir of Egyptian Islamic Jihad. The second section explores the issues that Zawahiri mentioned but failed to actually answer, namely al-Qa'ida's relationship with other insurgents in Iraq and al-Qa'ida's position toward Iran. Because Part II of his responses is forthcoming, one can only assume that Zawahiri is saving more complete answers on those questions. In the third section, the Combating Terrorism Center (CTC) offers its analysis of 1,888 questions that were posed to Zawahiri on the password-protected Al-Ekhlass and Al-Hesbah web sites. The CTC acquired these questions as part of its ongoing effort to identify and release relevant information for scholars, researchers, and the global public that is contained in U.S. government databases. Additionally, we have made these questions available, in their entirety, on the CTC web site
Bombers, Bank Accounts, & Bleedout. Al-Qa'ida's Road In and Out of Iraq ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This report is the second by the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point to assess the demographics, procedures, finances, and leadership of al-Qa'ida's foreign fighters, especially those currently fighting in Iraq. This report analyzes al-Qa'ida in Iraq's (AQI) operations from spring 2006 to summer 2007 and is being issued with a trove of AQI documents captured by coalition forces near Sinjar, Iraq. The documents include almost 600 AQI personnel records for foreign fighters crossing into Iraq, AQI contracts for suicide bombers, AQI contracts for fighters leaving Iraq, narratives written by al-Qa'ida's Syrian smugglers, and AQI financial records. The CTC also acquired demographic information on all Third Country Nationals (TCNs) in detention at Camp Bucca, Iraq. Most of this data has not previously been released to the public
Modest, secure and informed successful development in conflict zones by Eli Berman ( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Most interpretations of prevalent counterinsurgency theory imply that increasing government services will reduce rebel violence. Empirically, however, development programs and economic activity sometimes yield increased violence. Using new panel data on development spending in Iraq, we show that violence reducing effects of aid are greater when (a) projects are small, (b) troop strength is high, and (c) professional development expertise is available. These findings are consistent with a "hearts and minds" model, which predicts that violence reduction will result when projects are secure, valued by community members, and implementation is conditional on the behavior of non-combatants
Predation, taxation, investment and violence evidence from the Philippines by Eli Berman ( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This paper explores the relationship between investment and political violence through several possible mechanisms. Investment as a predictor of future violence implies that low private sector investment today provides a robust indicator of high violence tomorrow. "Rent-capture" or predation asserts that investment increases violence by motivating extortion by insurgents. A "hearts and minds" approach links investment to political violence in two possible ways: through an opportunity cost mechanism by which improved economic conditions raise the cost of rebel recruitment; and through a psychological "gratitude" effect which reduces cooperation of noncombatants with rebels. Finally, tax capture implies that government will increase coercive enforcement in an attempt to control areas where increased investment increases tax revenue. We lay out these mechanisms in a framework with strategic interaction between rebels, communities, government and firms within an information-centric or "hearts and minds" counterinsurgency model. We test these mechanisms in the context of the Philippines in the first decade of this century, using information on violent incidents initiated by both rebels and government and new data on industrial building permits, an indicator of economic investment. Increases in investment are positively correlated with both rebel and government initiated violence. In the context of our theory that constitutes unequivocal evidence of predation, is consistent with tax capture, and weighs against predictive investment, opportunity costs or gratitude being a dominant effect
Al-Qa'ida's foreign fighters in Iraq a first look at the Sinjar records by Joseph H Felter ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
On December 4, 2007 Abu Umar al-Baghdadi, the reputed Emir of al-Qa'ida's Islamic State of Iraq (151), claimed that his organization was almost purely Iraqi, containing only 200 foreign fighters. Twelve days later, on December 16, 2007, Ayman al-Zawahiri urged Sunnis in Iraq to unite behind the 151. Both statements are part of al-Qa'ida's ongoing struggle to appeal to Iraqis, many of whom resent the ISI's foreign leadership and its desire to impose strict Islamic law. In November 2007, received the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point nearly 700 records of foreign nationals that entered Iraq between August 2006 and August 2007. The data compiled and analyzed in this report is drawn from these personnel records, which was collected by al-Qa'ida's Iraqi affiliates, first the Mujahidin Shura Council (MSC) and then the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI). The records contain varying levels of information on each fighter, but often include the fighter's country of origin, hometown, age, occupation, the name of the fighter's recruiter, and even the route the fighter took to Iraq. The records were captured by coalition forces in October 2007 in a raid near Sinjar, along Iraq's Syrian border. Although there is some ambiguity in the data, it is likely that all of the fighters listed in the Sinjar Records crossed into Iraq from Syria. The Sinjar Records' existence was first reported by The New York Times' Richard Oppel, who was provided a partial summary of the data. The Combating Terrorism Center is pleased to make the Sinjar Records publicly available for the first time. The purpose of this initial assessment of the Sinjar Records is to provide scholars access to this unique data, in the hope that their scholarship will complement and compete with our own
Predation, economic activity and violence evidence from the Philippines by Eli Berman ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This paper explores the relationship between economic activity and political violence through the lenses provided by several different mechanisms. Investment as a predictor of future violence implies that low private sector investment today provides a robust indicator of high violence tomorrow. "Rent-capture" or predation asserts that economic programs and business investment will increase violence by increasing extortion by insurgents. "Hearts and minds" counterinsurgency has been asserted to link economic activity to political violence in three ways, through an opportunity cost mechanism by which improved economic conditions reduce the cost of rebel recruitment; through a "hope and gratitude" effect by which development assistance generates support for government, reducing cooperation with rebels; and thirdly, though an improved governance mechanism. We lay out these mechanisms in a framework with strategic interaction between rebels, communities, government and firms within an information-centric "hearts and minds" counterinsurgency model. We test the mechanisms in the context of the Philippines in the first decade of this century, using a new dataset that combines violent incidents with indicators of economic activity. The data support the predation thesis, while refuting the predictions of the predictive investment mechanism, the opportunity cost mechanism, and the gratitude effect
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.52 (from 0.00 for CTC Sentin ... to 0.93 for Predation, ...)
Languages
English (11)