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1759 : the year Britain became master of the world

Author: Frank McLynn
Publisher: New York : Atlantic Monthly Press, ©2004.
Edition/Format:   book_printbook : English : 1st American edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
History would have been different if not for the events of 1759. It was the fourth year of the Seven Years', or the French-and-Indian, War, and crucial victories against the French in the first truly global conflict laid the foundations of British supremacy throughout the world for the next hundred years. The defeat of the French not only paved the way for the global hegemony of the English language but also made  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Military history
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Frank McLynn
ISBN: 0871138816 9780871138811
OCLC Number: 56413697
Notes: Originally published: London : Jonathan Cape, 2004.
Description: x, 422 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 24 cm
Contents: The struggle for New France --
The Bonnie Prince and the crafty minister --
Pitt and the West Indies --
Canada --
India --
Wolfe at Quebec --
Lagos Bay, Portugal --
Minden --
The Plains of Abraham --
Rogers' Rangers --
Quiberon Bay.
Responsibility: Frank McLynn.
More information:

Abstract:

History would have been different if not for the events of 1759. It was the fourth year of the Seven Years', or the French-and-Indian, War, and crucial victories against the French in the first truly global conflict laid the foundations of British supremacy throughout the world for the next hundred years. The defeat of the French not only paved the way for the global hegemony of the English language but also made the emergence of the United States possible. Guiding us through England's often extremely narrow victories in India, North America, and the Caribbean, McLynn controversially suggests that the birth of the British Empire was more a result of luck than of rigorous planning. McLynn includes anecdotes of the intellectual and cultural leaders of the day--Swedenborg, Hume, Voltaire--and sources ranging from the Vatican archives to oral histories of Native Americans.--From publisher description.

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