skip to content
1846 : portrait of the nation Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

1846 : portrait of the nation

Author: Margaret C S Christman; National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1846 America, a young, vibrant republic, was expanding in directions unimagined only a few years earlier. The nation plunged into war with Mexico and rushed to settle the West. The country saw the steady rise of cities, the expansion of the railroad, and the emergence of great works of literature and art. On August 10 of that year, in an act that embodied the country's buoyant mood, Congress accepted the bequest
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Exhibition catalogs
History
Exhibitions
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Christman, Margaret C.S.
1846.
Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)605362605
Online version:
Christman, Margaret C.S.
1846.
Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)605589475
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Margaret C S Christman; National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)
ISBN: 1560986743 9781560986744
OCLC Number: 33948340
Notes: "In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Smithsonian Institution."
"Published ... for the National Portrait Gallery."
"An exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery commemorating the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Smithsonian Institution, April 12-August 18, 1996"--Title page verso.
Description: xx, 211 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 28 cm
Other Titles: Portrait of the nation
Responsibility: Margaret C.S. Christman.

Abstract:

In 1846 America, a young, vibrant republic, was expanding in directions unimagined only a few years earlier. The nation plunged into war with Mexico and rushed to settle the West. The country saw the steady rise of cities, the expansion of the railroad, and the emergence of great works of literature and art. On August 10 of that year, in an act that embodied the country's buoyant mood, Congress accepted the bequest of Englishman James Smithson and established an.

Institution dedicated to the "increase and diffusion of knowledge." Marking the Smithsonian Institution's 150th anniversary, 1846 evokes the texture of American daily life, thought, and politics during a single influential year. In a narrative accompanied by nearly two hundred illustrations, Margaret Christman revisits a capital dominated by Daniel Webster, John C. Calhoun, and James K. Polk and follows the westward journeys of Brigham Young, Francis Parkman, and the.

Ill-fated Donner party. Moving from the Transcendentalists to the Hudson River School, from Gothic Revival architecture to anesthesia and the sewing machine, Christman chronicles as well the antislavery movement and other social-reform campaigns that expanded the nation's conscience and changed its future.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/33948340>
library:oclcnum"33948340"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:alternateName"Portrait of the nation"@en
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/121893961>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)"
schema:copyrightYear"1996"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"Ill-fated Donner party. Moving from the Transcendentalists to the Hudson River School, from Gothic Revival architecture to anesthesia and the sewing machine, Christman chronicles as well the antislavery movement and other social-reform campaigns that expanded the nation's conscience and changed its future."@en
schema:description"Institution dedicated to the "increase and diffusion of knowledge." Marking the Smithsonian Institution's 150th anniversary, 1846 evokes the texture of American daily life, thought, and politics during a single influential year. In a narrative accompanied by nearly two hundred illustrations, Margaret Christman revisits a capital dominated by Daniel Webster, John C. Calhoun, and James K. Polk and follows the westward journeys of Brigham Young, Francis Parkman, and the."@en
schema:description"In 1846 America, a young, vibrant republic, was expanding in directions unimagined only a few years earlier. The nation plunged into war with Mexico and rushed to settle the West. The country saw the steady rise of cities, the expansion of the railroad, and the emergence of great works of literature and art. On August 10 of that year, in an act that embodied the country's buoyant mood, Congress accepted the bequest of Englishman James Smithson and established an."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/34681837>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"Exhibition catalogs"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"1846 : portrait of the nation"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.