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A. Philip Randolph and the struggle for civil rights

Author: Cornelius L Bynum
Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2010.
Series: New Black studies.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A. Philip Randolph's career as a trade unionist and civil rights activist fundamentally shaped the course of black protest in the mid-twentieth century. Standing alongside individuals such as W.E.B. Du Bois and Marcus Garvey at the center of the cultural renaissance and political radicalism that shaped communities such as Harlem in the 1920s and into the 1930s, Randolph fashioned an understanding of social justice  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Biography
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Bynum, Cornelius L., 1971-
A. Philip Randolph and the struggle for civil rights.
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2010
(DLC) 2010024822
(OCoLC)601330852
Named Person: A Philip Randolph; A Philip Randolph; A Philip Randolph
Material Type: Biography, Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Cornelius L Bynum
ISBN: 9780252090066 0252090063
OCLC Number: 702844583
Description: 1 online resource (xix, 244 pages) : illustrations.
Contents: A. Philip Randolph, racial identity, and family relations : tracing the development of a racial self-concept --
Religious faith and black empowerment : the AME Church and Randolph's racial identity and view of social justice --
Black radicalism in Harlem : Randolph's racial and political consciousness --
Crossing the color line : Randolph's transition from race to class consciousness --
A new crowd, a new Negro : the Messenger and new Negro ideology in the 1920s --
Black and white unite : Randolph and the divide between class theory and the race problem --
Ridin' the rails : Randolph and the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters' struggle for union recognition --
Where class consciousness falls short : Randolph and the Brotherhood's standing in the House of Labor --
Marching toward fair employment : Randolph, the race/class connection, and the March on Washington movement --
Epilogue : A. Philip Randolph's reconciliation of race and class in African American protest politics.
Series Title: New Black studies.
Responsibility: Cornelius L. Bynum.

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Chronicling the development of Randolph's political and racial ideology  Read more...

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"Relating Randolph's racial, economic, and political thought to his efforts to address injustice, this study is ideal for students and scholars of twentieth-century African American history, labor Read more...

 
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