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Adverse effects of vaccines : evidence and causality

Author: Kathleen Stratton; Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee to Review Adverse Effects of Vaccines.
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In 1900, for every 1000 babies born in the United States, 100 would die before their first birthday, often due to infectious diseases. Today, vaccines exist for many viral and bacterial diseases. The cornerstone of the vaccine safety system in the United States is the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. This legislation was intended to bolster vaccine research and development through federal coordination of  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee to Review Adverse Effects of Vaccines.
Adverse effects of vaccines.
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, 2012
(DLC) 2012007052
(OCoLC)778040126
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Kathleen Stratton; Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee to Review Adverse Effects of Vaccines.
ISBN: 9780309214360 030921436X
OCLC Number: 755123852
Description: 1 online resource (xxvii, 865 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Contents: Introduction --
Approach --
Evaluating biological mechanisms of adverse events --
Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine --
Varicella virus vaccine --
Influenza vaccine --
Hepatitis A vaccine --
Hepatitis B vaccine --
Human papillomavirus vaccine --
Diphtheria toxoid-, tetanus toxoid-, and acellular pertussis-containing vaccines --
Meningococcal vaccine --
Injection-related adverse events --
Concluding comments --
Glossary --
List of adverse events --
Literature search strategy --
Causality conclusion tables.
Responsibility: Committee to Review Adverse Effects of Vaccines, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Kathleen Stratton [and three others], editors ; Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.
More information:

Abstract:

"In 1900, for every 1000 babies born in the United States, 100 would die before their first birthday, often due to infectious diseases. Today, vaccines exist for many viral and bacterial diseases. The cornerstone of the vaccine safety system in the United States is the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. This legislation was intended to bolster vaccine research and development through federal coordination of vaccine initiatives, and by providing relief to vaccine manufacturers facing financial burdens. A key component of the legislation required the Department of Health and Human Services to collaborate with the Institute of Medicine to assess concerns about the safety of vaccines and potential adverse effects, especially in children. The Adverse Effects of Vaccines reviews the epidemiological, clinical, and biological evidence regarding adverse health effects associated with specific vaccines covered by the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program including varicella zoster vaccine, influenza vaccines, hepatitis B vaccine, and the human papillomavirus vaccine, among others. For each possible adverse event, the report reviews prior studies, summarizes their findings, and evaluates the epidemiological evidence. It finds that while no vaccine is 100% safe, very few adverse events are shown to be caused by vaccines. In addition, the evidence shows that vaccines do not cause several conditions of recent concern. For example, the MMR vaccine is not associated with autism or childhood diabetes. The DTaP vaccine is also not associated with diabetes and the influenza vaccine given as a shot does not exacerbate asthma. The Adverse Effects of Vaccines will be of special interest to the National Vaccine Program Office, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, vaccine safety researchers and manufacturers, parents, caregivers, and health professionals in the private and public sectors"--Publisher's description.

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