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African art

Author: Michel Leiris; Jacqueline Fry
Publisher: New York : Golden Press, 1968.
Series: Arts of mankind.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Our knowledge of the arts of Africa, and of the circumstances in which they have been practised, is still very incomplete. Created over a period of several millennia in a vast range of techniques and materials, and extending to every field of human activity, African artefacts are newaly all essentially functional, but at the same time they can stand as pure works of art in their own right. The great dance masks of  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michel Leiris; Jacqueline Fry
OCLC Number: 166813
Notes: Translation of Afrique noire, la création plastique.
Description: xi, 453 pages : illustrations (some color), map ; 29 cm.
Contents: pt. 1. Towards a definition of African art: The discovery of African art in the West --
Art and aesthetics --
Race, culture and geography --
Sources and styles --
pt. 2. The visual arts: Arts of the body --
Environmental arts --
Autonomous figurative arts --
pt. 3. Art and people: From Western Sudan to the Atlantic --
The Congolese mosaic --
East Africa --
South Africa --
pt. 4. Notes on the illustrations --
Glossary-index --
Maps.
Series Title: Arts of mankind.
Other Titles: Afrique noire.
Responsibility: Michel Leiris, Jacqueline Delange ; translated by Michael Ross.

Abstract:

"Our knowledge of the arts of Africa, and of the circumstances in which they have been practised, is still very incomplete. Created over a period of several millennia in a vast range of techniques and materials, and extending to every field of human activity, African artefacts are newaly all essentially functional, but at the same time they can stand as pure works of art in their own right. The great dance masks of the secret societies, the carved ancestor figures, the beautiful bronze heads from Benin and the terracottas from Ife, the steatite bird-man from Zimbabwe - all these have a precise magico-religious function which in no way impairs their aesthetic value. In this book the authors have provided a detailed historical and aesthetic study fo the rich and varied panorama of African art. The first part of the book sets in context the historical relationship between the African and Western cultures, the aesthetic outlook of the African peoples and the place of Africa in the history of art generally. The second and third parts form a detailed account of the arts of Africa, considered first according to category, and then region by region."--Amazon.

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Linked Data


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