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Against the death penalty : the relentless dissents of Justices Brennan and Marshall

Author: Michael Mello
Publisher: Boston : Northeastern University Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From 1976, when the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the death penalty in Gregg v. Georgia, until their retirements in the early 1990s, Justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall doggedly voted against capital punishment in over 2,500 cases. The Justices typically began their opinions by reiterating they were adhering to their views that "the death penalty is in all cases cruel and
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mello, Michael.
Against the death penalty.
Boston : Northeastern University Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)605189920
Online version:
Mello, Michael.
Against the death penalty.
Boston : Northeastern University Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)607695876
Named Person: William J Brennan; Thurgood Marshall; William J Brennan; Thurgood Marshall
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Mello
ISBN: 1555532616 9781555532611
OCLC Number: 33335259
Description: xii, 331 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: 1. The Two Justices --
2. Legitimacy in History --
3. Legitimacy in Theory --
4. Legitimacy in Judicial Politics.
Responsibility: Michael Mello.

Abstract:

Supreme Court Justices Brennan and Marshall dissented in over 2,500 capital punishment cases from 1976 until their retirements in the 1990s. Mello (law, Vermont Law School) scrupulously researches  Read more...

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schema:description"In this well-researched and copiously documented work, Michael Mello provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal, historical, and philosophical underpinnings of the Justices' relentless dissents against capital punishment. Mello begins with biographical sketches of Brennan and Marshall, examining how two men from divergent legal backgrounds came to share an unswerving stance against the death penalty. He then considers the historical, theoretical, and jurisprudential legitimacy of Supreme Court dissents in general, and sustained dissents in particular."@en
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