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Agatha Christie's Miss Marple. Collection 2

Author: Guy Slater; Joan Hickson
Publisher: [London] : BBC Worldwide ; [Collingwood, Vic.] : Madman Entertainment [distributor], 2009.
Edition/Format:   DVD video : PAL color broadcast system : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
THE MURDER AT THE VICARAGE : Colonel Lucius Protheroe has never been popular, but Miss Marple is surprised to overhear the Reverend Leonard Clement, vicar of St. Mary's, complaining about him most vehemently. As the day progresses, just how much he is loathed in the village becomes evident. Bill Archer, recently released from prison for poaching, is warned by Mary, the vicarage maid, to keep out of the Colonel's
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Genre/Form: Drama
Film adaptations
Named Person: Agatha Christie; Agatha Christie
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Guy Slater; Joan Hickson
OCLC Number: 318556666
Notes: "MMB962"
A pocketful of rye Originally televised in the UK 07/03/85 - 08/03/85. The music at the Vicarage Originally televised in the UK 25/12/86. - The sleeping murder Originally televised in the UK 11/01/87 - 18/01/87.
Credits: Produced by Guy Slater from the novels by Agatha Christie
Cast: Joan Hickson, with Renee Asherson and John Castle (The body in the library) ; Andrew Bicknell and Sabina Franklyn (The moving finger) ; Andrew Cruickshank and Raymond Francis (A murder is announced)
Target Audience: Censorship classification: M.
Description: 3 videodiscs (DVD) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Details: Region 4, PAL
Contents: A pocketful of rye - Parts 1,2 & 3 --
The music at the Vicarage --
The sleeping murder - Parts 1,2 & 3.
Other Titles: A pocketful of rye
The murder at the vicarage
Sleeping murder
Miss Marple.

Abstract:

THE MURDER AT THE VICARAGE : Colonel Lucius Protheroe has never been popular, but Miss Marple is surprised to overhear the Reverend Leonard Clement, vicar of St. Mary's, complaining about him most vehemently. As the day progresses, just how much he is loathed in the village becomes evident. Bill Archer, recently released from prison for poaching, is warned by Mary, the vicarage maid, to keep out of the Colonel's way as he is hell-bent on putting Archer back inside. Even Lettice, the Colonel's daughter, is mad at her father, after an incident involving Lawrence Redding, an attractive young artist. She can now understand why her mother left him many years ago. Clement later discovers Ann, the Colonel's second wife, in the arms of the artist. She confesses her love for Redding and her unhappiness with Protheroe. Griselda finds her at home party for the village gossips dominated by discussion of the Colonel's faults. The recent arrival of the mysterious, reclusive Mrs Lestrange and her relationship with Dr Haydock barely gets a mention The following day, the Colonel is found dead. Detective Inspector Slack arrives at the scene of the crime and is none-too-pleased to find Miss Marple already there, and as far as he is concerned the case is concluded when the next day Lawrence Redding confesses to killing the Colonel. But Dr Haydock maintains that at the time of death Redding was elsewhere, and Ann Protheroe insists that she shot her husband and Redding has confessed to save her although another witness contradicts her whereabouts at the time the shot was heard. Miss Marple has her own theories and Slack, with his usual bad grace, is forced to turn once again to her for help.

SLEEPING MURDER : Newly arrived from New Zealand, Giles and Gwenda Reed are searching for a suitable home in England. Hillside, a Victorian villa overlooking the seaside resort of Dillmouth, seems ideal. But no sooner have they bought it and moved in, than strange things begin to happen. Gwenda can't shake off the feeling that she has been here before and she feels an irrational sense of terror every time she climbs the stairs. To dispel her mounting panic she agrees to join Giles in London where he is visiting a distant cousin, Raymond West. Raymond is also playing host to his favourite aunt, Jane Marple. As part of her birthday celebrations he has arranged a theatre visit to see The Duchess of Malfi. During the performance Gwenda screams and runs terrified from the theatre. Later that night she tells Miss Marple of the vision she had of being on the stairs in Hillside, looking down into the hall at the body of a young woman who has been strangled, and knowing that her name was Helen. Giles and Gwenda return to Devon, determined to uncover the secret of Hillside and the identity of Helen. Miss Marple, fearing the consequences, follows them to Dillmouth under the pretext of needing a little sea air. It is soon established that, as a very young child, Gwenda had lived at Hillside with her father, Major Halliday, and his new young wife, Helen Kennedy. Helen's sudden disappearance one night had been the subject of much local conjecture. It is Dr Kennedy, Helen's older brother, who eventually comes forward to recount his story of the events that led up to her departure, and explain the subsequent fate of Major Halliday.Gwenda is much distressed to learn that, contrary to local gossip, Helen had run off with another man. It was her father's firm belief that he had strangled her and in consequence had ended his life in a sanitorium for the mentally ill. Even the fact that there was no body, and that Dr Kennedy subsequently received letters from Helen from abroad, could not shake his protestations of guilt. Miss Marple hints that they should search for the other man the someone else in Helen's life. Giles and Gwenda visit the sanitorium. They meet Dr Penrose, who expresses his doubts about Major Halliday's insanity and gives Gwenda the diary her father had been keeping up to his death. In it she reads: I always knew from the very first that there was someone else.

A POCKETFUL OF RYE : Rex Fortescue, head of a family firm of financiers, dies suddenly in his office in the City. Yew poisoning is diagnosed. Inspector Neele's only clue is a handful of rye found in the deceaseds jacket pocket. Fortescue had two sons: Percival (cautious and orthodox) and his younger brother, Lance, flamboyant, outgoing and last heard of in Africa. The family live at Yew Tree Lodge, a sombre house in the commuter belt. Rex had recently married a very much younger woman, Adele, who has a lover, Vivian. The house is presided over by Mary Dove, a cool, superior young housekeeper. Among the staff is a young housemaid, Gladys, who was trained in the Hampshire village of St Mary Mead by none other than Miss Jane Marple. Suspicion falls on the members of the household when the poison is identified as yew. The arrival of Lance causes more tension. Before his death Rex had secretly invited his prodigal son to rejoin the family firm. He was already on his way with his wife Pat when he read of his father's death. Shortly after his arrival, Adele is found dead. She too has been poisoned and it seems that almost everyone has a financial motive. Miss Marple hears of the double murder on the radio .The connection to her is clear the nursery rhyme: A Pocketful Of Rye.

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Linked Data


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