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The age of Edison : electric light and the invention of modern America

Author: Ernest Freeberg
Publisher: New York : The Penguin Press, 2013.
Series: Penguin history of American life.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but arguably the most important invention of all was Thomas Edison's incandescent lightbulb. Unveiled in his Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory in 1879, the lightbulb overwhelmed the American public with the sense of the birth of a new age. More than any other invention, the electric light marked the arrival of modernity. The lightbulb  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Named Person: Thomas A Edison; Thomas A Edison; Thomas A Edison
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Ernest Freeberg
ISBN: 9781101605479 1101605472
OCLC Number: 853093328
Description: 1 online resource (368 p.)
Series Title: Penguin history of American life.
Responsibility: Ernest Freeberg.

Abstract:

The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but arguably the most important invention of all was Thomas Edison's incandescent lightbulb. Unveiled in his Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory in 1879, the lightbulb overwhelmed the American public with the sense of the birth of a new age. More than any other invention, the electric light marked the arrival of modernity. The lightbulb became a catalyst for the nation's transformation from a rural to an urban-dominated culture. City streetlights defined zones between rich and poor, and the electrical grid sharpened the line between town and country. "Bright lights" meant "big city." Like moths to a flame, millions of Americans migrated to urban centers in these decades, leaving behind the shadow of candle and kerosene lamp in favor of the exciting brilliance of the urban streetscape. The Age of Edison In The Age of Edison

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