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The Age of gold

Author: Carlos Fuentes; Michael Gill; Peter Newington; Sogetel (Firm)
Publisher: [S.l.] : Public Media Video, ©1991.
Series: Buried mirror, program 3.
Edition/Format:   VHS video : VHS tape   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The New World brought Spain enormous treasures: gold, silver, chocolate, tomatoes, the potato. Yet Spain's most powerful ruler, Philip II, lived in austere solitude in a cell-like study. He sought to protect the Catholic faith, while Cervantes questioned all values in Don Quixote. Velázquez painted masterpieces of psychological penetration that vaulted the Atlantic.
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Details

Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Carlos Fuentes; Michael Gill; Peter Newington; Sogetel (Firm)
ISBN: 0780007255 9780780007253
OCLC Number: 26115910
Notes: Based on an original idea by Peggy K. Liss.
Credits: Photography by Terry Hopkins ; music by Carl Davis.
Performer(s): Carlos Fuentes.
Description: 1 videocassette (ca. 59 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
Details: VHS.
Contents: "The New World brought Spain (and ultimatley Europe) enormous treasures: gold, silver, chocolate, tomatoes, the potato. Yet Spain's most powerful ruler, Philip II, lived in austere solitude in a cell-like study. He sought to protect the Catholic faith, while the Spanish author Cervantes questioned all values in Don Quixote, the prototype of the modern noyel. At the court, Valazquez painted masterpieces of psychological penetration, and the Baroque style vaulted the Atlantic and celebrated its transformation into a tool for Indian fantasy in the magnificent churches of Potosi and Ocotlan." --cover.
Series Title: Buried mirror, program 3.
Responsibility: a Sogetel, S.A. production in association with the Smithsonian Institution, Quinto Centenario España ; produced by Michael Gill ; directed by Peter Newington ; written by Carlos Fuentes.

Abstract:

The New World brought Spain enormous treasures: gold, silver, chocolate, tomatoes, the potato. Yet Spain's most powerful ruler, Philip II, lived in austere solitude in a cell-like study. He sought to protect the Catholic faith, while Cervantes questioned all values in Don Quixote. Velázquez painted masterpieces of psychological penetration that vaulted the Atlantic.

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Linked Data


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