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Ah'd save de text for you : exploring Zora Neale Hurston's Characteristics of Negro expression

Author: Shondrika Lanise Moss
Publisher: 2003.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D., Performance Studies)--Northwestern University, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript : Microfiche   Archival Material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This dissertation examines Zora Neale Hurston's essay "Characteristics of Negro Expression" against selected African-American imaginative and artistic works. The three cases I have chosen are Zora Neale Hurston's novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, Alvin Ailey's dance Revelations , and Gloria Bond Clunie's adaptation of Patricia McKissack's children's book Mirandy and Brother Wind. Hurston's characteristics include
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Details

Named Person: Zora Neale Hurston; Gloria Bond Clunie; Pat McKissack; Gloria Bond Clunie; Zora Neale Hurston; Pat McKissack
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Shondrika Lanise Moss
OCLC Number: 184908627
Reproduction Notes: Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International, 2003. 3 microfiches ; 11 x 15 cm. "30-87949".
Description: viii, 240 leaves.
Responsibility: Shondrika Lanise Moss.

Abstract:

This dissertation examines Zora Neale Hurston's essay "Characteristics of Negro Expression" against selected African-American imaginative and artistic works. The three cases I have chosen are Zora Neale Hurston's novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, Alvin Ailey's dance Revelations , and Gloria Bond Clunie's adaptation of Patricia McKissack's children's book Mirandy and Brother Wind. Hurston's characteristics include dance, drama, folklore, the will to adorn, angularity, asymmetry, dialect, the jook, absence of the concept of privacy, imitation, and originality. In addition, I have expanded Hurston's research by adding my own characteristics: community, African-American ethos, ritual, nommo, call and response, ancestral memory, spirituality, and signifying.

Chapter One is a very detailed introduction to these characteristics. It gives background to Hurston and her literary works and research. In addition, this chapter demonstrates Hurston's contribution to the field of performance studies. Chapter Two, "Lies above Suspicion," analyzes Hurston's characteristics and the ones I added in relation to one of Hurston's most innovative works, Their Eyes Were Watching God. In this novel, Janie, an African-American woman, explores life and womanhood through her interaction with the communities she lives in. Chapter Three, " Revelations: A Dance Story," discovers the power of story and community in Alvin Ailey's monumental ballet, Revelations. Through the genre of dance, Hurston's characteristics take on a very different dimension. Chapter Four, "Spirit'll Find a Way to Break Free!," explores the characteristics through a play adaptation of the award-winning book Mirandy and Brother Wind. As an adapted and staged book, Mirandy and Brother Wind conveys the relationships between literature, dance, and theatre. In conclusion, Chapter Five advocates the benefits of utilizing Hurston's essay to conduct performance studies research. These imaginative works illuminate the exchange between the African-American community and African-American performance, and Hurston's essay also provides a catalyst for creating African-American performance and a model for its analysis.

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