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Akhenaten and Tutankhamun : revolution and restoration

Author: David P Silverman; Josef W Wegner; Jennifer Houser Wegner
Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, ©2006.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Three Penn Egyptologists examine the concept of royal power and demonstrate how Akhenaten established, projected, and maintained his vision of it. They investigate how and why this unique pharaoh made fundamental changes in the social contract between himself and his subjects on one side, and his new solar god, the Aten, and himself on the other. The authors also look at the radical religion, politics, and art he  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Akhenaton, King of Egypt.; Tutankhamen, King of Egypt.
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David P Silverman; Josef W Wegner; Jennifer Houser Wegner
ISBN: 1931707901 9781931707909
OCLC Number: 71810089
Description: 196 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm.
Contents: The evolution of the Pharaoh Akhenaten --
The religion of the Aten --
Founding Akhenaten's capital city --
Amarna's palaces and temples --
Amarna, a city of pageantry --
A place of artisans and administ[r]ators, daily life at Amarna --
The royal women of Armana --
Egypt's empire during the Amarna Age --
Tutankhamun and the return to tradition.
Other Titles: Akhenaten & Tutankhamun
Responsibility: David P. Silverman, Josef W. Wegner, Jennifer Houser Wegner.
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Abstract:

The Amarna Period, named after the site of an innovative capital city that was the center of the new religion, included the reigns Akhenaten and his presumed son, Tutankhamun.  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""Three Penn Egyptologists examine the concept of royal power and demonstrate how Akhenaten established, projected, and maintained his vision of it. They investigate how and why this unique pharaoh made fundamental changes in the social contract between himself and his subjects on one side, and his new solar god, the Aten, and himself on the other. The authors also look at the radical religion, politics, and art he introduced to Egypt as well as at the consequences of his actions after his death, including how his successors, most notably, Tutankhamun, Egypt's most famous pharaoh - dealt with the restoration of traditional ways. In a concise and readable form, this generously illustrated volume takes a fresh approach to a most fascinating period in Egyptian history."--BOOK JACKET."
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