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Alice Childress

Author: La Vinia Delois Jennings
Publisher: New York : Twayne Publishers ; London : Prentice Hall International, ©1995.
Series: Twayne's United States authors series, TUSAS 652.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A founding member of the American Negro Theatre, Childress became in 1952 the first African-American woman to see her play (Gold through the Trees) professionally produced in New York and in 1956 the first to receive an Obie Award (for Trouble in Mind). She is perhaps best known today, for A Hero Ain't Nothin' but a Sandwich, her 1973 novel for young adults about a 13-year-old black boy addicted to heroin. At the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Jennings, La Vinia Delois.
Alice Childress.
New York : Twayne Publishers ; London : Prentice Hall International, c1995
(OCoLC)604037338
Named Person: Alice Childress; Alice Childress; Alice Childress
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: La Vinia Delois Jennings
ISBN: 0805739637 9780805739633
OCLC Number: 32050492
Description: xvi, 157 p. : port. ; 23 cm.
Contents: "Turning against the tide" --
"Ain't you mad?" : women, anger, and interracial conflict --
Blacks in the abstract versus "flesh and blood niggers" : the black bourgeoisie, the matriarchy, and intraracial conflict --
"It's nation time" : the adolescent search for selfhood and acceptance --
A short walk --
"A candle in a gale wind."
Series Title: Twayne's United States authors series, TUSAS 652.
Responsibility: La Vinia Delois Jennings.

Abstract:

A founding member of the American Negro Theatre, Childress became in 1952 the first African-American woman to see her play (Gold through the Trees) professionally produced in New York and in 1956 the first to receive an Obie Award (for Trouble in Mind). She is perhaps best known today, for A Hero Ain't Nothin' but a Sandwich, her 1973 novel for young adults about a 13-year-old black boy addicted to heroin. At the time of her death in 1994, Childress could lay claim to a writing career of more than 40 years in which she examined with honesty and passion the meaning of being black, and especially of being black and female, in a culture where being white and male was what counted. As Childress herself once said, "I concentrate on portraying have-nots in a have society."

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