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Ambrose Bierce : alone in bad company

Auteur : Roy Morris, Jr.
Éditeur : New York : Crown Publishers, ©1995.
Édition/format :   Livre : Biographie : Anglais : 1st edVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
When 71-year-old Ambrose Bierce disappeared into revolution-torn Mexico in 1913, he probably had more enemies than any man alive. This was only fair; he had labored long and hard to make himself hateful, and in the end he succeeded all too well. The targets of his printed abuse ranged from the mightiest and most rapacious robber baron to the meekest and least offensive would-be poet, although Bierce reserved his
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Détails

Genre/forme : Biography
Format – détails additionnels : Online version:
Morris, Roy.
Ambrose Bierce.
New York : Crown Publishers, ©1995
(OCoLC)605094764
Personne nommée : Ambrose Bierce; Ambrose Bierce; Ambrose Bierce
Type d’ouvrage : Biographie
Format : Livre
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Roy Morris, Jr.
ISBN : 0517596466 9780517596463
Numéro OCLC : 32698310
Notes : Includes index.
Description : 306 pages ; 25 cm
Contenu : Direst of all disasters --
What I saw of Shiloh --
The woods of Chickamauga --
A brave and gallant fellow --
I respectfully decline the appointment --
The mentor, whip and mirror of the town --
A better country --
Prattle --
The Devil and the Wasp --
The friction that we name grief --
What a thing it is to be a ghost --
There be divers sorts of death.
Responsabilité : Roy Morris, Jr.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

When 71-year-old Ambrose Bierce disappeared into revolution-torn Mexico in 1913, he probably had more enemies than any man alive. This was only fair; he had labored long and hard to make himself hateful, and in the end he succeeded all too well. The targets of his printed abuse ranged from the mightiest and most rapacious robber baron to the meekest and least offensive would-be poet, although Bierce reserved his sharpest barbs for "that immortal ass, the average man." Bierce himself was anything but average. As the only American writer of any stature to fight in and survive the Civil War, his groundbreaking short stories of that war, including his most famous work, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," have had a lasting influence on every subsequent American author dealing with war, from Stephen Crane and John Dos Passos to Ernest Hemingway and Norman Mailer.

Profoundly disillusioned by his wartime experiences, Bierce spent the next fifty years struggling to disillusion his fellow Americans of their own cherished ideals - be they romantic, religious, or political. Frequently criticized for the intensity of his personal invective, Bierce once advised his detractors to "continue selling shoes, selling pancakes, or selling themselves. As for me I sell abuse." In this perceptive, insightful biography, Roy Morris, Jr., accounts for both the influential art that Ambrose Bierce made from such a harsh and unforgiving vision - and the high price he had to pay for it in loneliness, rancor, and spiritual isolation.

Table des matières :

de hytekswytek (Utilisateur WorldCat sur 2007-10-09)

Acknowledgements -- Prologue -- Direst of all disasters -- What I saw of Shiloh -- The woods of Chickamauga -- A brave and gallant fellow -- I respectfully decline the appointment -- The mentor, whip and mirror of the town -- A better country -- Prattle -- The devil and the wasp -- The friction that we name grief -- What a thing it is to be a ghost -- here be divers sorts of death -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

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Données liées


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