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The American Foreign Legion : Black soldiers of the 93d in World War I

Author: Frank E Roberts
Publisher: Annapolis, Md. : Naval Institute Press, ©2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Still segregated in World War I, the U.S. Army was reluctant to use its 93d Divison of black soldiers in combat with its own units and instead assigned the division's three National Guard regiments and one draftee regiment to the French Army. The battlefield successes of these African Americans under the French at the height of the German offensives in 1918 turned white expectations of failure upside down. Their
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Roberts, Frank E., 1933-
American Foreign Legion.
Annapolis, Md. : Naval Institute Press, c2004
(OCoLC)607231578
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Frank E Roberts
ISBN: 1591147344 9781591147343
OCLC Number: 53932634
Description: 259 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: A foreign legion is born --
The 93d Division's first regiment --
The 15th's trials at Spartanburg --
The "Eighth Illinois" mobilizes --
The draftees of the 371st Infantry --
The composite 372d Infantry --
The 15th New York Infantry sails for France --
The 15th becomes the 369th Infantry --
The rest of the 93d Division ships out --
The 370th starts combat training --
The 371st goes into the trenches --
The 372d gets its first taste of combat --
The 93d Division's first heroes --
The elastic defense and the 369th --
Marshal Foch prepares to attack --
The first stages of the fall offensive --
The attack on Bellevue Signal Ridge --
The push beyond Bellevue Signal Ridge --
The 370th attacks at Canal de l'Oisel'Aisne --
The 370th in pursuit --
Final days on the Vosges Front --
Armistice --
Homeward bound.
Responsibility: Frank E. Roberts.
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Abstract:

"Still segregated in World War I, the U.S. Army was reluctant to use its 93d Divison of black soldiers in combat with its own units and instead assigned the division's three National Guard regiments and one draftee regiment to the French Army. The battlefield successes of these African Americans under the French at the height of the German offensives in 1918 turned white expectations of failure upside down. Their bravery and heroism gained the respect of the French and Germans alike and called into question the U.S. Army's policy of racially segregating its divisions.".

"Their story of overcoming the odds at a time when most believed black performed poorly in combat is told by Frank E. Roberts, who has been researching the subject for years. While acknowledging the many problems encountered by the 93d, he focuses on the many triumphs of these tenacious soliders as they fought both the enemy and the prejudices of their fellow Americans."--BOOK JACKET.

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