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American-made : the enduring legacy of the WPA : when FDR put the nation to work

Author: Nick Taylor
Publisher: New York : Bantam Book, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When President Roosevelt took the oath of office in 1933, he was facing a devastated nation. Four years into the Great Depression, 13 million American workers were jobless. What people wanted were jobs, not handouts, and in 1935, after a variety of temporary relief measures, a permanent nationwide jobs program was created--the Works Progress Administration, which would forever change the physical landscape and the  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Taylor, Nick, 1945-
American-made.
New York : Bantam Book, 2008
(OCoLC)651915228
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Nick Taylor
ISBN: 9780553802351 0553802356
OCLC Number: 170057676
Description: viii, 630 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Prologue --
pt. 1. In extremis --
pt. 2. Hope on the rise --
pt. 3. The dawn of the WPA --
pt. 4. Folly and triumph --
pt. 5. The arts programs --
6. The phantom of recovery --
pt. 7. The WPA under attack --
pt. 8. WPA : War Preparation Agency --
Epilogue : The legacy of the WPA --
Glossary --
Some highlights of the WPA --
A chronology : 1929-1946 --
Bibliography --
Notes --
Acknowledgments --
Index.
Responsibility: Nick Taylor.
More information:

Abstract:

When President Roosevelt took the oath of office in 1933, he was facing a devastated nation. Four years into the Great Depression, 13 million American workers were jobless. What people wanted were jobs, not handouts, and in 1935, after a variety of temporary relief measures, a permanent nationwide jobs program was created--the Works Progress Administration, which would forever change the physical landscape and the social policies of the United States. The WPA lasted for eight years, spent $11 billion, and employed 8 and a half million men and women. The agency combined the urgency of putting people back to work with a vision of physically rebuilding America. Its workers laid roads, erected dams, bridges, tunnels, and airports, but also performed concerts, staged plays, and painted murals. Sixty years later, there is almost no area in America that does not bear some visible mark of its presence.--From publisher description.

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Linked Data


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