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American National Election Study : 2000 Pilot Study

Author: Virginia Sapiro; Steven J Rosenstone; National Election Studies.; Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
Publisher: Ann Arbor, Mich. : Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2000.
Series: ICPSR (Series), 2936.
Edition/Format:   Computer file : English : Second ICPSR VersionView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This brief special-topic Pilot study focused on a single general topic, trust. Respondents were asked for their opinions on the honesty, respectfulness, courteousness, and general trustworthiness of the neighbors in their communities, their colleagues at work, and politicians. Questions included items on respondents' membership in community organizations and attendance at meetings, whether the respondents worked  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Virginia Sapiro; Steven J Rosenstone; National Election Studies.; Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
OCLC Number: 61153090
Notes: Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2004-10-30.
Details: Mode of access: Intranet.
Contents: Part 1: Data File
Series Title: ICPSR (Series), 2936.
Responsibility: Virginia Sapiro, Steven J. Rosenstone,

Abstract:

This brief special-topic Pilot study focused on a single general topic, trust. Respondents were asked for their opinions on the honesty, respectfulness, courteousness, and general trustworthiness of the neighbors in their communities, their colleagues at work, and politicians. Questions included items on respondents' membership in community organizations and attendance at meetings, whether the respondents worked cooperatively with others on community issues, and whether they had ever contacted government officials regarding community concerns. Politicians were evaluated as to their respect for the citizenry and for their opponents, whether they made campaign promises that they did not intend to keep, and whether politicians would pay more attention to people like the respondent if elections were held more often. One section of the questionnaire asked respondents to gauge how participating in certain activities (attending religious services, following public affairs, voting) and having certain opinions (in favor of further integrating public schools, increasing Social Security spending, instituting term limits for Congress) would shape other people's impressions of them. Demographic variables include gender, race, employment status, and length of residency in the community.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02936

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Linked Data


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