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American National Election Study, 2000 : Pre- and Post-Election Survey

Author: Nancy BurnsDonald R KinderSteven J RosenstoneVirginia SapiroNational Election Studies.All authors
Publisher: Ann Arbor, Mich. : Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2001.
Series: ICPSR (Series), 3131.
Edition/Format:   Computer file : English : 2nd ICPSR versionView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2000 National Election Study (NES)  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Nancy Burns; Donald R Kinder; Steven J Rosenstone; Virginia Sapiro; National Election Studies.; Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
OCLC Number: 61153540
Notes: Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2004-10-30.
Details: Mode of access: Intranet.
Contents: Part 1: Data File
Series Title: ICPSR (Series), 3131.
Responsibility: Nancy Burns, Donald R. Kinder, Steven J. Rosenstone, Virginia Sapiro, National Election Studies

Abstract:

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2000 National Election Study (NES) entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election reinterview. A freshly drawn cross- section of the electorate was taken to yield 1,807 cases. Because the study includes a carefully designed mode experiment, the data represent two presidential studies in 2000, side by side. The core study preserves the past commitment to probability area sampling and face-to-face interviewing: 1,000 respondents were interviewed prior to the election and 694 were reinterviewed face-to-face after the election. Supporting the core study, random-digit dial sampling and telephone interviewing were used: 803 respondents were interviewed by phone prior to the election and 862 respondents were interviewed by phone after the election. As such, the experiment examines the differences between the two modes and provides a preview of what shifting to telephone interviewing will mean for the NES time-series. The content of the 2000 election study reflects its dual purpose as a traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a mode study. Many of the substantive themes included in the 2000 questionnaires are a continuation of past topics. Interest in politics and the election was examined through questions regarding interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, and information about politics. Respondents' knowledge of candidates and the political parties was ascertained through que... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03131

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