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America's failing empire : U.S. foreign relations since the Cold War

Author: Warren I Cohen
Publisher: Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2005.
Series: America's recent past, 1.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This sharp and authoritative account of American foreign relations analyzes the last 15 years of foreign policy, since the end of the Cold War, in relation to the last 40 years. In 1989, the US emerged as victor from the Cold War struggle. But what did victory mean? In the US, commentators were divided in their views: some feared their nation's eclipse by more successful trading powers or blocs; others were  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Warren I Cohen
ISBN: 9781405114264 1405114266 9781405114271 1405114274 0631186344 9780631186342
OCLC Number: 57186089
Description: 204 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction: The Cold War as history --
The end of the Cold War International System --
In search of a compass --
Clinton and humanitarian intervention --
Managing the Great Powers --
The Clinton years assessed --
The Vulcans take charge --
Once upon an Empire --
All the rest-and Bush Assessed.
Series Title: America's recent past, 1.
Responsibility: Warren I. Cohen.
More information:

Abstract:

"This sharp and authoritative account of American foreign relations analyzes the last 15 years of foreign policy, since the end of the Cold War, in relation to the last 40 years. In 1989, the US emerged as victor from the Cold War struggle. But what did victory mean? In the US, commentators were divided in their views: some feared their nation's eclipse by more successful trading powers or blocs; others were concerned that undoubted military pre-eminence was in effect financed by foreigners." "A little over a decade later, these worries seem remote - but others have replaced them. The attacks on the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001, gave the US a new and unwelcome sense of vulnerability, while the responses of the Bush administration have created grave misgivings in many parts of the world. This study gives readers an overview and understanding of the recent history of US foreign relations from the viewpoint of one of the most respected authorities in the field."--Jacket.

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