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America's fair share : the admission and resettlement of displaced persons, 1945-1952

Author: Haim Genizi
Publisher: Detroit : Wayne State University Press, ©1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
During the 1930s and the war years, the mood of American Christians toward refugees - Jews as well as other Christians who were victims of the Holocaust - was generally apathetic. After 1947 though, church leaders showed sustained interest in the issue when they learned that eighty percent of the displaced persons (DPs) were not Jews but European Christians running away from communism. America's Fair Share is the  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Haim Genizi
ISBN: 0814324606 9780814324608
OCLC Number: 28025572
Description: xi, 273 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: The plight of Christian refugees from Nazism, 1933-1945 --
The DP problem in Germany and Austria, 1945-1947 --
UNRRA and the voluntary agencies in Germany, 1945-1947 --
Voluntary agencies and CRALOG --
The lobby for the DP Act, 1946-1948 --
The debates concerning the entrance of Nazi collaborators, 1948-1950 --
The Displaced Persons Commission and the resettlement of DPs, 1948-1952 --
The Church World Service and the protestant DPs --
The Lutheran Resettlement Service --
The National Catholic Resettlement Council and the Catholic DPs --
The United Service for New Americans and the Jewish DPs.
Responsibility: Haim Genizi.

Abstract:

During the 1930s and the war years, the mood of American Christians toward refugees - Jews as well as other Christians who were victims of the Holocaust - was generally apathetic. After 1947 though, church leaders showed sustained interest in the issue when they learned that eighty percent of the displaced persons (DPs) were not Jews but European Christians running away from communism. America's Fair Share is the first serious research focusing on the extraordinary period of organized mass immigration and resettlement that took place in the postwar years. Haim Genizi compares the activities of the major sectarian relief agencies and examines in detail their help to hundreds of thousands of DPs. Using neglected archival sources of church-related relief organizations, he studies the relations of Christian relief agencies with the American army in Europe and the DP Commission. He discusses the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, which differed from the traditional immigration policy based on the laissez-faire philosophy, and contends that it was purposely designed to discriminate against Jews. Finally, Genizi addresses the interfaith controversy that arose as to the admission of Nazi collaborators to the United States. The successful DP operation, which admitted and resettled almost a half million people during a short period of time, and in which church-related agencies played the major role, was a remarkable achievement. However, an examination of the considerations that led to this action shows that the motivations behind the DP program were not purely humanitarian. Genizi's comparison of America's impressive activities on behalf of DPs after the war with the negative attitude toward Christian and Jewish refugees during the Hitler era lends understanding to the real motivations behind the action and inaction of the American people.

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Linked Data


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