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Ancestry and narrative in nineteenth-century British literature : blood relations from Edgeworth to Hardy

Author: Sophie Gilmartin
Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Series: Cambridge studies in nineteenth-century literature and culture, 18.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This study addresses the question of why ideas of ancestry and kinship were so important in nineteenth-century society, and particularly in the Victorian novel. Through readings of a range of literary texts, Sophie Gilmartin explores questions fundamental to the national and racial identity of Victorian Britons. What makes people believe that they are part of a certain region, race or nation? Is this sense of
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Genealogy
History
Named Person: Maria Edgeworth; Charles Dickens; Maria Edgeworth; Charles Dickens; Charles Dickens; Maria Edgeworth
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Sophie Gilmartin
ISBN: 0521560942 9780521560948
OCLC Number: 38120540
Description: xiii, 281 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: Oral and written genealogies in Edgeworth's The absentee --
A mirror for matriarchs: the cult of Mary Queen of Scots in nineteenth-century literature --
Pedigree, nation, race: the case of Disraeli's Sybil and Tancred --
'A sort of Royal family': alternative pedigrees in Meredith's Evan Harrington --
Pedigree, sati and the widow in Meredith's The egoist --
Pedigree and forgetting in Hardy --
Geology and genealogy: Hardy's The well-beloved.
Series Title: Cambridge studies in nineteenth-century literature and culture, 18.
Responsibility: Sophie Gilmartin.
More information:

Abstract:

This study addresses the question of why ideas of ancestry and kinship were so important in nineteenth-century society, and particularly in the Victorian novel. Through readings of a range of literary texts, Sophie Gilmartin explores questions fundamental to the national and racial identity of Victorian Britons. What makes people believe that they are part of a certain region, race or nation? Is this sense of belonging based on superstitious beliefs, invented traditions, or fictions created to gain a sense of unity or community? As Britain extended her empire over foreign nations and races, questions of blood relations, of assimilation and difference, and of national and racial definition came to the fore.

Gilmartin's study shows how ideas of ancestry and kinship, and the narratives inspired by or invented around them, were of profound significance in the construction of Victorian identity.

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