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The ancient middle classes : urban life and aesthetics in the Roman Empire, 100 BCE-250 CE

Author: Emanuel Mayer
Publisher: Cambridge : Harvard University Press, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Our image of the Roman world is shaped by the writings of Roman statesmen and upper class intellectuals. Yet most of the material evidence we have from Roman times--art, architecture, and household artifacts from Pompeii and elsewhere--belonged to, and was made for, artisans, merchants, and professionals. Roman culture as we have seen it with our own eyes, Emanuel Mayer boldly argues, turns out to be distinctly  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mayer, Emanuel.
Ancient middle classes.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2012
(OCoLC)807732972
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Emanuel Mayer
ISBN: 9780674050334 0674050339
OCLC Number: 758383409
Description: xiv, 295 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Class, stratification and culture: the Roman middle classes and their place in history --
In search of ancient middle classes: an archaeology of middle classes in urban life, 100 B.C.E.-250 C.E. --
From commercial to middle classes: urban life and economy in the Roman Empire --
In search of middle class culture: commemorating working and private lives --
Décor and lifestyle: the aesthetics of standardization --
Conclusions.
Responsibility: Emanuel Mayer.

Abstract:

Our image of the Roman world is shaped by the writings of upper-class intellectuals. Yet most of the material evidence we have--art, architecture, household artifacts--belonged to artisans,  Read more...

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[A] remarkable volume Mayer provides an indispensable and well-argued refutation of the conventional top-down readings of Roman art.--G. S. Gessert"Choice" (12/01/2012)"

 
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