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Anglo-American connections in Japanese chemistry : the lab as contact zone

Author: Yoshiyuki Kikuchi
Publisher: New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
Series: Palgrave studies in the history of science and technology.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science have begun to look critically at scientific pedagogy - how young scientists are made, examining such questions as the extent to which scientific pedagogy shapes research and how pedagogical regimes interact with wider societies. In light of today's global and transnational society, it is necessary, even pressing, to add a fourth dimension to this research  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Yoshiyuki Kikuchi
ISBN: 9780230117785 0230117783
OCLC Number: 796757183
Description: xvii, 279 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Contents: 1. Japanese Chemistry Students in Britain and the United States in the 1860s --
2. American and British Chemists and Lab-based Chemical Education in Early Meiji Japan --
3. The Making of Japanese Chemists in Japan, Britain, and the United States --
4. Defining Scientific and Technological Education in Chemistry in Japan, 1880-1886 --
5. Constructing a Pedagogical Space for Pure Chemistry at the Imperial University --
6. Making Use of a Pedagogical Space for Pure Chemistry --
7. Connecting Applied Chemistry Teaching to Manufacturing --
Epilogue: Departure from Meiji Japanese Chemistry.
Series Title: Palgrave studies in the history of science and technology.
Responsibility: Yoshiyuki Kikuchi.
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Abstract:

This book offers a transnational look at the history of Japanese chemistry and its interactions with the West in the late nineteenth to early twentieth century.  Read more...

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'In this fluent account of the dynamic interplay between individual English and American chemists and their Japanese students in three continents, Kikuchi provides a vivid analysis of how different Read more...

 
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