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Anima mundi : the rise of the world soul theory in modern German philosophy

Author: Mikls Vassnyi
Publisher: Dordrecht ; New York : Springer, 2011.
Series: International Archives of the History of Ideas / Archives internationales d'histoire des idées, 202.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
First affirmed by Plato, the concept of the world as a cosmic living being, possessed of a soul, gained great importance in the Stoic and Neo-Platonic philosophical schools. Several medieval philosophers displayed an interest in this theory of the world soul, which retained its attractive power even into the Renaissance. However, the leading early modern rationalists, especially Leibniz, found the world soul  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Mikls Vassnyi
ISBN: 9789048187966 9048187966
OCLC Number: 695387299
Description: 1 online resource.
Contents: Note continued: 4. Leibniz's Particular Arguments Against the Identification of God with the World Soul in Deum non esse animam mundi. The Problematic Possibility that There is an anima mundi Subordinate to God --
5. Leibniz's Toleration of the Nominal Identification of a Universal Spirit with the World Soul. His Arguments Against the Identification of God with the Totality of All Finite Spirits: Considerations sur la Doctrine d'un Esprit Universel Unique. Plotinus' Arguments in Favour of the Identification of the World Soul with the Totality of All Finite Spirits: Enneads IV/2 and [ect.] --
6. Wolffian Argument Against the Existence of a World Soul: the Difference of the Object of Perception from the Organ of Perception --
7. General Assessment of the Theology of Causal Divine Presence in the Wolffian-Baumgartenian School and Its Shortcomings --
8. Ploucquet's Criticism of Hylozoism and of Leibnizian Monadology. His Own Philosophy of Nature --
9. Systematic Confrontation of the General anima mundi Theory with the Theology of Causal Divine Presence of the Leibnizian Tradition --
pt. II "Les Naturalistes" --
Eighteenth-Century Physico-Theology: The Scientific Demonstration of the Existence and Attributes of God from the Teleology of Nature. The World Soul Theory in Physico-Theology. Physico-Theology As a Source of Inspiration for the Early German Romantics --
4. Preliminary Historical and Conceptual Presentation of "L'Histoire Naturelle" in Selected Major Works of some Leading Naturalists. The Relation of Natural Science to Theology or Spirituality in their Works --
1. Definition of the Key Concepts: "Les Naturalistes" and "Physico-Theology" --
2. Major Sources of Eighteenth-Century Physico-Theology --
5. General Philosophical Analysis of Physico-Theology --
1. Quality of Physico-Theology as a Natural Science: the Example of Cosmology. Note continued: 7. Philosophical Incompatibility of Spinoza's System with the World Soul Theory. Bayle's Identification of Spinozism with the World Soul Theory, and Wachter's Denial of the Same. Lessing's Statement Concerning the World Soul, and His Alleged Spinozism in Jacobi's Ueber die Lehre des Spinoza (1 1785), Mendelssohn's Morgenstunden (1785), and Herder's Gott. Einige Gesprache (1787). Herder's Rejection of the Identification of God with the [ect.] --
1. Spinoza's Pananimism. His General Conception and Definition of the Soul in the Korte verhandeling, Second Appendix: Van de menschelyke ziel (approx. 1660-1662, publ. 1 1862), the Cogitata metaphysica (1663), and the Epistles OP No XXXIV (1665) and XXI (1675) --
2. Spinoza's Specific Definition of the Soul in the Korte verhandeling and Ethica I --
II (1663-1675): the Case of the Human Mind, mens humana. The Role of the Ideas as Mediators Between the Infinite Intellect, and the Finite Minds. Philosophical Parallelism with Ficino's Theologia Platonica --
3. Spinoza's Concept of God as the Single Infinite Substance. The Philosophical Incompatibility of Spinozism with the anima mundi-Theory --
4. Bayle's Fundamental Philosophical Intention in the Spinoza-Article of His Dictionaire historique et critique (1 1697) --
5. Bayle's Identification of Spinozism with the World Soul Theory in Footnote A of the Spinoza-Article. Seneca's Concept of God as an Alleged Philosophical Mediator. Bayle's Own Criticism of the World Soul Theory --
6. Wachter's Position in the Elucidarius Cabalisticus (1702, publ. 1706) that Spinozism is Philosophically Incompatible with the World Soul Theory --
7. Leibniz's Confrontation with Wachter and Spinoza, in His Animadversiones ad Joh. Georg. Wachteri librum de Recondita Hebraeorum Philosophia (approx. 1706-1710), in Connection with the Anima mundi-Theory.
Series Title: International Archives of the History of Ideas / Archives internationales d'histoire des idées, 202.
Responsibility: by Mikls Vassnyi.

Abstract:

First affirmed by Plato, the concept of the world as a cosmic living being, possessed of a soul, gained great importance in the Stoic and Neo-Platonic philosophical schools. Several medieval philosophers displayed an interest in this theory of the world soul, which retained its attractive power even into the Renaissance. However, the leading early modern rationalists, especially Leibniz, found the world soul philosophically unacceptable. Why and how then did the German Romantics of the late 1700s and early 1800s - first and foremost Franz von Baader and Schelling - come resolutely to posit the existence of the world soul? In Anima Mundi: The Rise of the World Soul Theory in Modern German Philosophy, Miklós Vassányi shows that the metaphysical aspirations of the early German Romantics could not be satisfied by the Leibnizian concept of a God beyond the world. Powerful as Leibniz's argument is when primarily the existence of God is considered, it fails to convincingly account for the presence of God within the world, and for the unity of the world. The fundamental existential experience of the Romantics was that God is immediately present in Nature, that God and Nature constitute an indissoluble Absolute. The best philosophical instrument to articulate their theory of the interpenetration of the Finite and the Infinite was a theory of the soul of the world.

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