aller au contenu
Animal madness : how anxious dogs, compulsive parrots, and elephants in recovery help us understand ourselves Aperçu de cet ouvrage
FermerAperçu de cet ouvrage
Vérifiant…

Animal madness : how anxious dogs, compulsive parrots, and elephants in recovery help us understand ourselves

Auteur : Laurel Braitman
Éditeur : New York : Simon & Schuster, 2014.
Édition/format :   Print book : Anglais : First Simon & Schuster hardcover editionVoir toutes les éditions et tous les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
"For the first time, a historian of science draws evidence from across the world to show how humans and other animals are astonishingly similar when it comes to their feelings and the ways in which they lose their minds. Charles Darwin developed his evolutionary theories by looking at physical differences in Galapagos finches and fancy pigeons. Alfred Russell Wallace investigated a range of creatures in the Malay
Évaluation :

(pas encore évalué) 0 avec des critiques - Soyez le premier.

Sujets
Plus comme ceci

 

Trouver un exemplaire dans la bibliothèque

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Recherche de bibliothèques qui possèdent cet ouvrage...

Détails

Format : Livre
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Laurel Braitman
ISBN : 9781451627008 1451627009
Numéro OCLC : 868000590
Description : 373 pages ; 24 cm
Contenu : The tail tip of the iceberg --
Proxies and mirrors --
Diagnosing the elephant --
If Juliet were a parrot --
Animal pharm --
Family therapy --
Epilogue: When the devil fish forgive.
Responsabilité : Laurel Braitman.

Résumé :

"For the first time, a historian of science draws evidence from across the world to show how humans and other animals are astonishingly similar when it comes to their feelings and the ways in which they lose their minds. Charles Darwin developed his evolutionary theories by looking at physical differences in Galapagos finches and fancy pigeons. Alfred Russell Wallace investigated a range of creatures in the Malay Archipelago. Laurel Braitman got her lessons closer to home--by watching her dog. Oliver snapped at flies that only he could see, ate Ziploc bags, towels, and cartons of eggs. He suffered debilitating separation anxiety, was prone to aggression, and may even have attempted suicide. Her experience with Oliver forced Laurel to acknowledge a form of continuity between humans and other animals that, first as a biology major and later as a PhD student at MIT, she'd never been taught in school. Nonhuman animals can lose their minds. And when they do, it often looks a lot like human mental illness. Thankfully, all of us can heal. As Laurel spent three years traveling the world in search of emotionally disturbed animals and the people who care for them, she discovered numerous stories of recovery: parrots that learn how to stop plucking their feathers, dogs that cease licking their tails raw, polar bears that stop swimming in compulsive circles, and great apes that benefit from the help of human psychiatrists. How do these animals recover? The same way we do: with love, with medicine, and above all, with the knowledge that someone understands why we suffer and what can make us feel better. After all of the digging in the archives of museums and zoos, the years synthesizing scientific literature, and the hours observing dog parks, wildlife encounters, and amusement parks, Laurel found that understanding the emotional distress of animals can help us better understand ourselves."--Publisher information.

"For the first time, a historian of science draws evidence from across the world to show how humans and other animals are astonishingly similar when it comes to their feelings and the ways in which they lose their minds"--

Critiques

Critiques d’utilisateurs
Récupération des critiques de GoodReads...
Récuperation des critiques DOGObooks…

Tags

Tous les tags des utilisateurs (1)

Voir les tags les plus utilisés sous forme de : liste de tags | nuage de tags

Ouvrages semblables

Sujets associés :(7)

Listes d’utilisateurs dans lesquelles cet ouvrage apparaît (3)

Confirmez cette demande

Vous avez peut-être déjà demandé cet ouvrage. Veuillez sélectionner OK si vous voulez poursuivre avec cette demande quand même.

Données liées


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/868000590> # Animal madness : how anxious dogs, compulsive parrots, and elephants in recovery help us understand ourselves
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book ;
    library:oclcnum "868000590" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/nyu> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/psychology_general> ; # PSYCHOLOGY / General
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/591.5/e23/> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/animal_psychology> ; # Animal psychology
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/tierpsychologie> ; # Tierpsychologie
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/verhaltensforschung> ; # Verhaltensforschung
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/animal_behavior> ; # Animal behavior
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/nature_animals_general> ; # NATURE / Animals / General
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/science_life_sciences_evolution> ; # SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Evolution
    schema:author <http://viaf.org/viaf/305939592> ; # Laurel Braitman
    schema:bookEdition "First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition." ;
    schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
    schema:datePublished "2014" ;
    schema:description ""For the first time, a historian of science draws evidence from across the world to show how humans and other animals are astonishingly similar when it comes to their feelings and the ways in which they lose their minds"--"@en ;
    schema:description ""For the first time, a historian of science draws evidence from across the world to show how humans and other animals are astonishingly similar when it comes to their feelings and the ways in which they lose their minds. Charles Darwin developed his evolutionary theories by looking at physical differences in Galapagos finches and fancy pigeons. Alfred Russell Wallace investigated a range of creatures in the Malay Archipelago. Laurel Braitman got her lessons closer to home--by watching her dog. Oliver snapped at flies that only he could see, ate Ziploc bags, towels, and cartons of eggs. He suffered debilitating separation anxiety, was prone to aggression, and may even have attempted suicide. Her experience with Oliver forced Laurel to acknowledge a form of continuity between humans and other animals that, first as a biology major and later as a PhD student at MIT, she'd never been taught in school. Nonhuman animals can lose their minds. And when they do, it often looks a lot like human mental illness. Thankfully, all of us can heal. As Laurel spent three years traveling the world in search of emotionally disturbed animals and the people who care for them, she discovered numerous stories of recovery: parrots that learn how to stop plucking their feathers, dogs that cease licking their tails raw, polar bears that stop swimming in compulsive circles, and great apes that benefit from the help of human psychiatrists. How do these animals recover? The same way we do: with love, with medicine, and above all, with the knowledge that someone understands why we suffer and what can make us feel better. After all of the digging in the archives of museums and zoos, the years synthesizing scientific literature, and the hours observing dog parks, wildlife encounters, and amusement parks, Laurel found that understanding the emotional distress of animals can help us better understand ourselves."--Publisher information."@en ;
    schema:description "The tail tip of the iceberg -- Proxies and mirrors -- Diagnosing the elephant -- If Juliet were a parrot -- Animal pharm -- Family therapy -- Epilogue: When the devil fish forgive."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1758738276> ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:name "Animal madness : how anxious dogs, compulsive parrots, and elephants in recovery help us understand ourselves"@en ;
    schema:productID "868000590" ;
    schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781451627008> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/868000590> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/animal_psychology> # Animal psychology
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Animal psychology"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/nature_animals_general> # NATURE / Animals / General
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "NATURE / Animals / General"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/psychology_general> # PSYCHOLOGY / General
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "PSYCHOLOGY / General"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/science_life_sciences_evolution> # SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Evolution
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Evolution"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1758738276#Topic/verhaltensforschung> # Verhaltensforschung
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Verhaltensforschung"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/305939592> # Laurel Braitman
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Braitman" ;
    schema:givenName "Laurel" ;
    schema:name "Laurel Braitman" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781451627008>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
    schema:description "hardback" ;
    schema:isbn "1451627009" ;
    schema:isbn "9781451627008" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/868000590>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
    schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/868000590> ; # Animal madness : how anxious dogs, compulsive parrots, and elephants in recovery help us understand ourselves
    schema:dateModified "2015-03-27" ;
    void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Fermer la fenêtre

Veuillez vous identifier dans WorldCat 

Vous n’avez pas de compte? Vous pouvez facilement créer un compte gratuit.