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Anime from Akira to Princess Mononoke : experiencing contemporary Japanese animation

Author: Susan Jolliffe Napier
Publisher: New York : Palgrave, 2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Japanese animation, known as anime to its fans, has a firm hold on American pop culture. However, anime is much more than children's cartoons. It runs the gamut from historical epics to sci-fi sexual thrillers. Often dismissed as fanciful entertainment, anime is actually quite adept at portraying important social and cultural issues such as alienation, gender inequality, and teenage angst. This book investigates the  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Susan Jolliffe Napier
ISBN: 0312238622 9780312238629 0312238630 9780312238636
OCLC Number: 45189031
Description: viii, 311 p. : col. ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Why anime? --
Anime and local/global identity --
Akira and Ranma 1/2 : the monstrous adolescent --
Controlling bodies : the body in pornographic anime --
Ghosts and machines : the technological body --
Doll parts : technology and the body in Ghost in the shell --
The enchantment of estrangement : the shōjo in the world of Miyazaki Hayao --
Carnival and conservatism in romantic comedy --
No more words : Barefoot Gen, Grave of the fireflies, and "victim's history" --
Princess Mononoke : fantasy, the feminine, and the myth of "progress" --
Waiting for the end of the world : apocalyptic identity --
Elegies --
Conclusion : A fragmented mirror --
Appendix : The fifth look : Western audiences and Japanese animation.
Responsibility: Susan J. Napier.
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This text investigates the ways that Japanese animation - anime - presents issues in an in-depth and sophisticated manner, uncovering the identity conflicts, fears over rapid technological  Read more...

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0;This is a riveting and inspiring book, one that I have thoroughly enjoyed reading and from which I have learned a great deal. As a source of concrete information about Japanese animation it is Read more...

 
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