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"Answer at once" : letters of mountain families in Shenandoah National Park, 1934-1938

Auteur: Katrina M Powell
Uitgever: Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2009.
Editie/Formaat:   Boek : Deelstaats- of provinciale overheidsuitgave : EngelsAlle edities en materiaalsoorten bekijken.
Database:WorldCat
Samenvatting:
With the Commonwealth of Virginia's Public Park Condemnation Act of 1928, the state surveyed for and acquired three thousand tracts of land that would become Shenandoah National Park. The Commonwealth condemned the homes of five hundred families so that their land could be "donated" to the federal government and placed under the auspices of the National Park Service. Prompted by the condemnation of their land, the  Meer lezen...
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Details

Genre/Vorm: History
Records and correspondence
Sources
Correspondence
Genre: Overheidsuitgave, Deelstaats- of provinciale overheidsuitgave
Soort document: Boek
Alle auteurs / medewerkers: Katrina M Powell
ISBN: 9780813928531 0813928532 9780813928906 0813928907
OCLC-nummer: 317118332
Beschrijving: xx, 174 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
Inhoud: Foreword / Caroline E. Janney --
Preface --
Introduction : Processes of displacement and the development of Shenandoah national Park during the 1930s America --
1934 : Removing materials, collecting wood, and requesting assistance --
1935 : Requesting buildings, harvesting crops, and extending permits --
1936 : Resolving disputes and demanding park officials' responsibility --
1937 : Defending honor --
1938 : Maintaining daily life --
Epilogue : Remaining concerns and revising eminent domain laws.
Verantwoordelijkheid: edited by Katrina M. Powell.

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With the Commonwealth of Virginia's Public Park Condemnation Act of 1928, the state surveyed for and acquired three thousand tracts of land that would become Shenandoah National Park. This title  Meer lezen...

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Unlike most U.S. national parks, which were carved out of public lands, Shenandoah National Park was in part created through the condemnation of private lands held by more than 500 families, many of Meer lezen...

 
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Gekoppelde data


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schema:description"Foreword / Caroline E. Janney -- Preface -- Introduction : Processes of displacement and the development of Shenandoah national Park during the 1930s America -- 1934 : Removing materials, collecting wood, and requesting assistance -- 1935 : Requesting buildings, harvesting crops, and extending permits -- 1936 : Resolving disputes and demanding park officials' responsibility -- 1937 : Defending honor -- 1938 : Maintaining daily life -- Epilogue : Remaining concerns and revising eminent domain laws."@en
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