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The antislavery argument

Author: William H Pease; Jane H Pease
Publisher: Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill [©1965]
Series: American heritage series (New York, N.Y.)
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William H Pease; Jane H Pease
OCLC Number: 426800
Description: xcvi, 492 pages 21 cm.
Contents: Arguments for philanthropic and gradual emancipation. Anthony Benezet attacks the slave trade --
John Woolman preaches against slaveholding --
The American Convention for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery advocates gradual emancipation --
Arguments concerning colonization. Robert Goodloe Harper defends African colonization --
Colored Americans object to colonization --
Frances Wright presents a colonization plan --
James G. Birney despairs of equal rights for Negroes --
Francis P. Blair, Jr., turns colonization to political advantage --
Argument for immediate emancipation. New England Anti-Slavery Society defines immediate emancipation --
American Anti-Slavery Society declares its sentiments --
Amos A. Phelps supports immediate action --
Argument from sentiment. Lydia Maria Child plays up the atrocity theme --
James A. Thome condemns licentiousness --
Theodore Dwight Weld shows slavery as it is --
John G. Whittier stirs sympathy for the fugitives --
Harriet Beecher Stowe describes slavery's horrors in fiction --
Arguments from religion. Leonard Bacon pleads for moderation --
William Ellery Channing opposes slavery on rational religious grounds --
John Rankin asserts that religious teaching is against slavery --
John G. Whittier renders a vivid slavery scene at the North --
William Lloyd Garrison defends abolitionist "infidelity" --
Stephen S. Foster damns the pro-slavery churches --
Arguments from economics. Elias Hicks urges people not to buy slave-produced goods --
American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society addresses the non-slaveholders of the South --
Hinton Rowan Helper addresses the non-slaveholders of the South --
Charles C. Burleigh emphasizes economic advantage for the North --
William Henry Seward warns of an irrepressible economic conflict --
Argument for direct action. Beriah Green counsels Northern men about what to do --
The American Anti-Slavery Society admonishes the Negroes how to act --
William King plans a Negro settlement --
Elihu Burritt proposes compensated emancipation --
Maria Weston Chapman urges support of the American Ant-Slavery Society --
The New England Anti-Slavery Convention exhorts the slaves to direct action --
Argument from natural rights and natural law. Charles Follen links equality with natural rights --
James Forten, Jr., pleads for Negro rights --
William Ellery Channing defines the use of the higher law --
Theodore Parker warns of the dangers which threaten the rights of man --
Argument from civil liberties. Gerrit Smith defends free speech as God-given right --
John Quincy Adams defends the right of petition --
Edward Beecher examines the Alton Affair --
Colored men of America demand equal rights as Americans --
Charles Sumner argues for school desegregation --
Argument for racial equality. David Walker proposes activism and revolution --
James Russell Lowell condemns the prejudice of color --
Nathaniel P. Rogers ridicules the blue collapse stage of prejudice --
Martin Delany exhorts the Negro to straighten his shoulders and raise his eyes --
Hosea Easton condemns color prejudice against the Negroes --
Charles Remond condemns discrimination in public transportation --
Arguments on the Consistution. William I. Bowditch condemns the Constitution as proslavery --
Frederick Douglass asserts that the Constitution is antislavery --
William Goodell argues the antislavery nature of the Constitution on a variety of grounds --
Robert Rantoul, Jr., interprets the Constitution strictly and concludes it is antislavery --
Salmon P. Chase argues in defense of an Underground Railroad operator --
Argument for political action: regular parties. The Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society addresses Massachusetts abolitionists on the subject of political action --
Joshua R. Giddings supports antislavery action through major parties --
Argument for political action: third parties. Arnold Buffum lauds the antislavery third party --
William Goodell endorses a many-planked political platform --
Charles Sumner explains the duties of Massachusetts during the Kansas-Nebraska crisis --
Charles Francis Adams condemns the Know-Nothings --
Frederick Douglass denounces disunion as a futile antislavery device --
Argument against political action. Wendell Phillips vigorously eschews political action --
Stephen S. Foster is sure that revolution is the only remedy --
Emancipation and the War Power. Abraham Lincoln decrees emancipation --
The Emancipation Proclamation --
The Thirteenth Amendment ends slavery in the United States.
Series Title: American heritage series (New York, N.Y.)
Responsibility: edited by William H. Pease and Jane H. Pease.

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