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Antonín Dvořák; musician and craftsman.

Author: John Clapham
Publisher: New York, St. Martin's Press [1966]
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Of all Slavonic composers Dvorak stands nearest to the great Viennese classical tradition, yet (paradoxically) he is intensely national and as personal a composer as has ever lived. (This is a paradox within a paradox: so many "national" composers seem to have sunk personality in nationality.) He is, as someone has said, "the most musical composer since Schubert"--Who, as the article reprinted on pp. 296-305 shows  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Clapham, John.
Antonín Dvořák.
New York, St. Martin's Press [1966]
(OCoLC)639395099
Named Person: Antonín Dvořák; Antonín Dvořák
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Clapham
OCLC Number: 228812
Description: xviii, 341 pages genealogical table, music, plates (including facsimiles, portraits) 26 cm
Contents: Foreword / Gerald Abraham --
Preface --
Note on pronunciation --
Part one : The man and his art. Biographical sketch --
Methods of work and features of style --
Part two : Instrumental works. The symphonies --
The concertos --
Programme music and overtures --
Miscellaneous orchestral works --
Chamber music for strings --
Chamber music with pianoforte --
Pianoforte music --
Compositions for violin and violoncello --
Part three : Vocal music. The songs --
Cantata, mass and oratorio --
Part-songs --
The operas --
Appendices. Genealogical tree --
Dvorak on Schubert, with a letter from Sir George Grove --
Catalogue of completed works --
Works in order of composition --
Select bibliography.

Abstract:

Of all Slavonic composers Dvorak stands nearest to the great Viennese classical tradition, yet (paradoxically) he is intensely national and as personal a composer as has ever lived. (This is a paradox within a paradox: so many "national" composers seem to have sunk personality in nationality.) He is, as someone has said, "the most musical composer since Schubert"--Who, as the article reprinted on pp. 296-305 shows us, was his idol and whom he criticized in terms that often apply to himself -- and the very ease with which he seems not only to have poured out melody but to have thought contrapuntally, so that even his mere doodling is apt to be in invertible counterpoint, has sometimes led (a third paradox) to undervaluation of his powers. - Foreword.

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