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Antonio Stradivari, his life and work, 1644-1737,

Autor: William Henry Hill; Arthur F Hill; Alfred Ebsworth Hill
Editora: New York, Dover Publications [1963]
Séries: American Musicological Society-Music Library Association reprint series.
Edição/Formato   Livro : Biografia : InglêsVer todas as edições e formatos
Base de Dados:WorldCat
Resumo:
A biography of the seventeenth-century Italian craftsman considered one of the finest violin makers of all time.
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Formato Físico Adicional: Online version:
Hill, William Henry, 1857-1927.
Antonio Stradivari.
New York : Dover Publications, 1963
(OCoLC)594215118
Pessoa Denominada: Antonio Stradivari; Antonio Stradivari; Antonio Stradivari
Tipo de Material: Biografia
Tipo de Documento: Livro
Todos os Autores / Contribuintes: William Henry Hill; Arthur F Hill; Alfred Ebsworth Hill
Número OCLC: 172278
Descrição: xxiv, 314 pages illustrations, plates, facsimiles 21 cm.
Conteúdos: I. The ancestry of Antonio Stradivari : The search for the certificate of his birth ; Reason to believe that he was not porn in Cremona ; His marriage ; The census returns ; The purchase of his house and its subsequent history ; His home life and his children ; The death and burial of his first wife ; His second marriage ; The purchase of a tomb in the church of S. Domenico ; The burials therein ; His death and interment ; The demolition of the church of S. Domenico ; The disinterment of his remains and the disposal of them II. Stradivari's violins : The tradition that Stradivari was a pupil of Nicolo Amati ; The actual proof ; His fellow-apprentices ; His early work and surroundings ; His connection with Nicolo Amati until the latter's death in 1684 ; His first label ; The dimensions of his earlier works, and comparison with those of Nicolo Amati ; Subsequent developments ; The inception of the "long strad" ; in 1690 ; The return to Amati traditions in 1698 ; A review of his work and the position to which he had attained by the end of the century ; The down of the new century ; The "Betts" violin, 1704 ; The following years ; Fewness of his productions ; His partiality for certain wood ; The varying character of his work ; Comparisons of famous examples ; His seventy-sixth birthday, in 1720 ; The question of his being assisted in his work ; The features of the instruments of this period ; The "Rode" inlaid violin, 1722 ; The other similar examples made by the master ; The Spanish set and their history ; The year 1727 ; He records his age ; Consideration of the master's supposed pupils ; The violins of his last years ; Those made by his sons ; Those made up from parts left unfinished by him ; Contradictory statements as to his exact age, and elucidation of the matter ; His death III. Stradivari's violas : The small number existing ; A retrospect of violas made previously to his time ; The proportions as adopted by him founded on the work of Antonius and Hieronymus Amati ; The difficulty in accounting for the adoption of a smaller size ; The music of the period ; Comparison of the different example, 1731, and the Berlioz incident ; Characteristics of the violas as a whole; The maker's shortcomings IV. Stradivari's violoncellos : Their excellence ; A retrospect of the instruments made previously ; The gradual adoption of an instrument of smaller proportions ; Stradivari's non-participation in the movement ; His early productions ; Review and comparison of his pre-1700 examples ; The "Medici", "Aylesford", "Cristiani", and "Servais" instruments ; His tardy adoption of the smaller proportions ; The earliest dated example known ; Examination of the designs left by him ; The supreme merti of the examples of this form ; Their tone ; The views of Piatti, and Romberg's statement ; The number existing, and their history ; The master's adherence to this type until 1730 ; A narrower form adopted in that year ; A retrospect V. Stradivari's aims in relation to tone : Stradivari's aims in relation to tone : The achievements of Gasparo and Maggini ; The four generations of the Amatis ; The tonal success of their instruments ; The non-existence of any record by past great players of the tonal merits of their instruments ; The pre-1684 Stradivary ; Its character of tone ; Changes between 1684 and 1690 ; The long strad of 1690 ; Its tonal quality ; The "Tuscan" ; The brilliancy of its tone ; The production of tone in relation to Stradivari instruments ; Lady Halle, Joachim, Sarasate, and Piatti ; Prejudice against certain violins ; The difficulty of forming a correct judgment ; The "Betts" Stradivari ; The distinguishing characteristics of its tone, the result attained by Stradivari ; The "Ernst" Stradivari ; The "Viotti" ; Joachim's violins, their tone ; The "Alard" example ; Violins of the years 1720-22 ; Sarasate's violin, 1727 ; Other examples ; Reason why Stradivari instruments are in universal use ; A resume VI. Stradivari's material :Erroneous views disseminated concerning its magical properties ; Its part in relation to the successful construction of an instrument ; A retrospect concerning the wood used by the early makers ; Where obtained ; The trees in given years ; Scarcity at times of foreign maple ; The pine of the bellies ; The virtues of old wood VII. Stradivari's varnish : The varnish used by other Italian makers ; Amateur workers on the subject ; Was the recipe a trade secret? ; The present existence of Stradivari's written formula ; Whence sprang the use of fine varnishes and pure colours? ; The Amati colour ; The basis of Stradivari's varnish ; Reade's remarks ; The importance of the backs ; The gradual disuse of oil varnishes ; The reason for this, its revival, and final disappearance ; The effect of the varnish upon tone VIII. Stradivari's construction : Based upon the work of the past ; The master, above all, a practical workman ; Examination of the interior construction ; The thicknesses of Gasparo, Maggini, the Amati, and those of Stradivari ; The blocks and linings ; The bass-bar, its function and origin ; The bars of early makers compared with those used by Stradivari ; The outline ; The marked originality of the Italians ; The use of moulds for bending the sides ; Those employed by the master ; The purfling ; The sound-holes ; The modeling ; The head ; Stradivari's method of work ; His bridges, finger-boards, and fittings ; The Dalla Valle Collection of patterns, etc. IX. Stradivari's labels : Statement on the subject of labels in general ; The early origin of the practice of inserting false labels in instruments ; Its true significance ; Stradivari's earliest label ; The second type of label ; The reason why they are falsified ; Changes in 1670, in 1680, and in 1690 ; the third types of label ; Groups of figures ; Fourth and last type of label X. The number of instruments made by Stradivari : The master's industry ; Count Cozio's statement ; Computation of the time spent by Stradivari in making a violin ; The master a quick workman ; The rarity of his early productions and the reason ; Increase in the total number made ; The various types of instruments made by the master ; Result of our researches to ascertain the number of his works now existing ; The greatest number dating from one year ; The destruction of Stradivaris in the past ; A word of warning regarding the preservation of those which have been preserved ; Imprudent owners and would-be restorers ; Their ruthless acts XI. The prices paid for Stradivari instruments and the growth of their reputation : The earliest records of money paid for Cremonese instruments ; The relative value of the money ; The price paid for an Amati in 1630 ; The price of a Brescian violin ; Researches in foreign archives ; The present given to Stradivari by the Duke of Modena, and the title of appointment granted by the Archbishop of Benevento ; Review of different statements as to the actual sum charged by the master for an instrument ; Count Cozio's correspondence ; Interesting letters of Stradivari's son as to the price asked in Cremona for one of his father's violins ; The quintet of instruments sold to the Spanish court ; Reasons for dismissing assertions that Stradivari was but poorly remunerated ; The spread of the fame of the master's instruments ; Stainers and Amatis, contemporary opinions and comparisons ; The introduction of Stradivari instruments into France and England ; The first revelation of their supreme merit ; The players who played upon them ; The effect on other violin makers of the period ; The flow of Stradivari instruments into France ; Early transactions in England ; The dealers of the period ; Examples brought to our shores by well-known families ; Prices paid towards the end of the eighteenth century, and onwards during the nineteenth century ; A few words as to the collectors ; Count Cozio and the value at which he estimated the "Messie" example in 1808 XII. Stradivari's supposed portrait : History of the portrait ; A critical review ; The truth as to the portrait.
Título da Série: American Musicological Society-Music Library Association reprint series.
Responsabilidade: by W. Henry Hill, Arthur F. Hill, and Alfred E. Hill. With a new introd. by Sydney Beck and new supplementary indexes by Rembert Wurlitzer.

Resumo:

A biography of the seventeenth-century Italian craftsman considered one of the finest violin makers of all time.

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schema:description"I. The ancestry of Antonio Stradivari : The search for the certificate of his birth ; Reason to believe that he was not porn in Cremona ; His marriage ; The census returns ; The purchase of his house and its subsequent history ; His home life and his children ; The death and burial of his first wife ; His second marriage ; The purchase of a tomb in the church of S. Domenico ; The burials therein ; His death and interment ; The demolition of the church of S. Domenico ; The disinterment of his remains and the disposal of them"@en
schema:description"X. The number of instruments made by Stradivari : The master's industry ; Count Cozio's statement ; Computation of the time spent by Stradivari in making a violin ; The master a quick workman ; The rarity of his early productions and the reason ; Increase in the total number made ; The various types of instruments made by the master ; Result of our researches to ascertain the number of his works now existing ; The greatest number dating from one year ; The destruction of Stradivaris in the past ; A word of warning regarding the preservation of those which have been preserved ; Imprudent owners and would-be restorers ; Their ruthless acts"@en
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schema:description"IV. Stradivari's violoncellos : Their excellence ; A retrospect of the instruments made previously ; The gradual adoption of an instrument of smaller proportions ; Stradivari's non-participation in the movement ; His early productions ; Review and comparison of his pre-1700 examples ; The "Medici", "Aylesford", "Cristiani", and "Servais" instruments ; His tardy adoption of the smaller proportions ; The earliest dated example known ; Examination of the designs left by him ; The supreme merti of the examples of this form ; Their tone ; The views of Piatti, and Romberg's statement ; The number existing, and their history ; The master's adherence to this type until 1730 ; A narrower form adopted in that year ; A retrospect"@en
schema:description"IX. Stradivari's labels : Statement on the subject of labels in general ; The early origin of the practice of inserting false labels in instruments ; Its true significance ; Stradivari's earliest label ; The second type of label ; The reason why they are falsified ; Changes in 1670, in 1680, and in 1690 ; the third types of label ; Groups of figures ; Fourth and last type of label"@en
schema:description"VIII. Stradivari's construction : Based upon the work of the past ; The master, above all, a practical workman ; Examination of the interior construction ; The thicknesses of Gasparo, Maggini, the Amati, and those of Stradivari ; The blocks and linings ; The bass-bar, its function and origin ; The bars of early makers compared with those used by Stradivari ; The outline ; The marked originality of the Italians ; The use of moulds for bending the sides ; Those employed by the master ; The purfling ; The sound-holes ; The modeling ; The head ; Stradivari's method of work ; His bridges, finger-boards, and fittings ; The Dalla Valle Collection of patterns, etc."@en
schema:description"V. Stradivari's aims in relation to tone : Stradivari's aims in relation to tone : The achievements of Gasparo and Maggini ; The four generations of the Amatis ; The tonal success of their instruments ; The non-existence of any record by past great players of the tonal merits of their instruments ; The pre-1684 Stradivary ; Its character of tone ; Changes between 1684 and 1690 ; The long strad of 1690 ; Its tonal quality ; The "Tuscan" ; The brilliancy of its tone ; The production of tone in relation to Stradivari instruments ; Lady Halle, Joachim, Sarasate, and Piatti ; Prejudice against certain violins ; The difficulty of forming a correct judgment ; The "Betts" Stradivari ; The distinguishing characteristics of its tone, the result attained by Stradivari ; The "Ernst" Stradivari ; The "Viotti" ; Joachim's violins, their tone ; The "Alard" example ; Violins of the years 1720-22 ; Sarasate's violin, 1727 ; Other examples ; Reason why Stradivari instruments are in universal use ; A resume"@en
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