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The Arabian frontier of the British Raj : merchants, rulers, and the British in the nineteenth-century Gulf

Author: James Onley
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2007.
Series: Oxford historical monographs.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The Arabian Frontier of the British Raj is a study of one of the most forbidding frontier zones of Britain's Indian Empire. The Gulf Residency, responsible for Britain's relationship with Eastern Arabia and Southern Persia, was part of an extensive network of political residencies that surrounded and protected British India. Based on extensive archival research in both the Gulf and Britain, this book examines how  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James Onley
ISBN: 9780199228102 0199228108
OCLC Number: 124949467
Awards: Runner-up for Albert Hourani Book Award 2008.
Description: p. cm.
Contents: Conventions, terminology, and transliteration --
Acknowledgements --
Introduction --
The subject --
The sources --
Overview --
Empire --
British India's informal empire and spheres of influence in Asia and Africa --
British India's residency system in Asia and Africa --
The origins of the residency system, 1613-1763 --
The politicization and expansion of the residency system, 1764-1947 --
The residency system and Britain's Indian empire --
Imperialism and the strategy of informal empire --
The Indian political service (IPS), 1764-1947 --
Early British involvement in the Gulf, 1616-1822 --
Britain's political residency in the Gulf, 1822-1971 --
Britain's native agency in Bahrain, c. 1816-1900 --
Agents of empire --
British India's native agency system in Asia --
British India's native agency system in Asia --
British India's native agency system in the Gulf --
British motives for employing native agents --
Robinson's theory of collaboration --
The Indian origins of the native agency system --
The politicization of the native agency system in India and the Gulf --
Early native agents in the Gulf --
The establishment of the native agency system in the Gulf --
Advantages for the British --
Disadvantages for the British --
Advantages and disadvantages for the native agents --
The operation of British India's native agency in Bahrain --
The agency building --
The agency's finances and organization --
The agent's intelligence-gathering duties, c.1816-1900 --
The agent's judicial duties, 1861-1900 --
The agents' political duties, 1872-1900 --
The agents' social duties --
British India's native agents in Bahrain --
The banias, c.1816-34 --
The Safar family agents --
Mirza Muhammad Cali Safar, 1834-42 --
Hajji Jasim (Hajji Abu'l Qasim), 1842-62 --
Hajji Ibrahim bin Muhsin bin Rajab, 1862-4 --
Years of abeyance, 1865-71 --
Hajji Cabd al-Nabi Khan Safar, 1872-84 --
Hajji Ahmad Khan Safar, 1884-91 --
Temporary agents, 1891-3 --
Agha Muhammad Rahim Safar, 1893-1900 --
Hajji Cabbas bin Muhammad bin Fadhil, 1900 --
The native agency staff after 1900 --
Challenges to the agents, 1834-97 --
The decline of British India's native agency system in Bahrain and the Gulf --
The rift in agent-ruler relations, 1895-1900 --
The agent's conflict between trade and politics, 1897-9 --
The argument for a political agency, 1897-9 --
The transition to a political agency, 1899-1900 --
The Arabian frontier of the Indian empire --
Appendix A a British India's residency system in Asia and Africa --
British India's residency system, 1880s --
Gulf residency organization --
Gulf residency staff --
Gulf residency budget --
Graded officers serving in political residencies, 1877 --
British military establishments in the Gulf --
Appendix B rulers and residents --
Rulers of Bahrain --
Residents in Bushire --
Agents for the lower Gulf (qishm island) --
Political residents in the Gulf (Bushire) --
Political residents in the Gulf (Ras al-Jufair, Bahrain) --
Governors of Bombay --
Viceroys of India --
Appendix C British India's native agents in Bahrain --
Native agents --
Native agency staff --
British-Indian steam navigation Co. agents (Gray Paul & Co.) --
Merchant grades --
Appendix D British control : Bahrain v. the Indian states --
Appendix E Anglo-Bahraini legal obligations and rights.
Series Title: Oxford historical monographs.
Responsibility: James Onley.
More information:

Abstract:

"The Arabian Frontier of the British Raj is a study of one of the most forbidding frontier zones of Britain's Indian Empire. The Gulf Residency, responsible for Britain's relationship with Eastern Arabia and Southern Persia, was part of an extensive network of political residencies that surrounded and protected British India. Based on extensive archival research in both the Gulf and Britain, this book examines how Britain's Political Residents in the Gulf and his very small cadre of British officers maintained the Pax Britannica on the waters of the Gulf." "James Onley looks at the secret to the Gulf Residency's effectiveness - the extent to which the British worked within the indigenous political systems of the Gulf. He examines the way in which Arab rulers in need of protection collaborated with the Resident to maintain the Pax Britannica, while influential men from affluent Arab, Persian, and Indian merchant families served as the Resident's 'native agents' (compradors) in over half of the political posts within the Gulf Residency."--BOOK JACKET.

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[an] illuminating book... Peter Clark, Asian Affairs Conveys a great sense of intellectual excitement in its confident, but careful, rethinking of the British Indian Empire... Onley has the enviable Read more...

 
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