skip to content
Archbishop William Laud Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Archbishop William Laud

Author: Charles Carlton
Publisher: London ; New York : Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
History has not been kind to Archbishop William Laud. His cause -- sustaining the absolute rights of his king, Charles I -- was not a popular one. Moreover, unlike his great contemporaries, Cardinals Mazarin and Richelieu in France, his cause failed: so not even success justified his zeal. Nor was 'little Laud', a dumpy, dimunitive figure lacking presence or grandeur, much imbued with many of the Christian virtues.  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Carlton, Charles, 1941-
Archbishop William Laud.
London ; New York : Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987
(OCoLC)568746316
Named Person: William Laud
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Charles Carlton
ISBN: 0710204639 9780710204639
OCLC Number: 16525250
Notes: Includes index.
Description: x, 272 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Where I was bred up --
I made all quiet in the college --
Pastors, labourers, and watchmen --
A cloud arising --
Nothing but trouble and danger --
The little man is come up trumps --
The Richelieu of England --
To be your chancellor --
More vinegar than oil --
Who's the fool now? --
The beast is wounded --
A foul business it is --
The sty of all pestilential filth --
Never be afraid to die, nor ashamed to live --
Epilogue.
Responsibility: Charles Carlton.

Abstract:

History has not been kind to Archbishop William Laud. His cause -- sustaining the absolute rights of his king, Charles I -- was not a popular one. Moreover, unlike his great contemporaries, Cardinals Mazarin and Richelieu in France, his cause failed: so not even success justified his zeal. Nor was 'little Laud', a dumpy, dimunitive figure lacking presence or grandeur, much imbued with many of the Christian virtues. He was vindictive and petty, deep in the sin of pride. Few if any mourned him when his head fell from the executioner's axe in January 1645. Yet Laud was significant. In this fine biography Charles Carlton shows how Laud dragged the English Church, and with it English society, towards a new and radical version of Anglicanism. Carlton presents Laud in the context of his times, showing how closely his personal life and character were woven into his political and religious career. - Jacket flap.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/16525250>
library:oclcnum"16525250"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/16525250>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1987"
schema:description"Where I was bred up -- I made all quiet in the college -- Pastors, labourers, and watchmen -- A cloud arising -- Nothing but trouble and danger -- The little man is come up trumps -- The Richelieu of England -- To be your chancellor -- More vinegar than oil -- Who's the fool now? -- The beast is wounded -- A foul business it is -- The sty of all pestilential filth -- Never be afraid to die, nor ashamed to live -- Epilogue."@en
schema:description"History has not been kind to Archbishop William Laud. His cause -- sustaining the absolute rights of his king, Charles I -- was not a popular one. Moreover, unlike his great contemporaries, Cardinals Mazarin and Richelieu in France, his cause failed: so not even success justified his zeal. Nor was 'little Laud', a dumpy, dimunitive figure lacking presence or grandeur, much imbued with many of the Christian virtues. He was vindictive and petty, deep in the sin of pride. Few if any mourned him when his head fell from the executioner's axe in January 1645. Yet Laud was significant. In this fine biography Charles Carlton shows how Laud dragged the English Church, and with it English society, towards a new and radical version of Anglicanism. Carlton presents Laud in the context of his times, showing how closely his personal life and character were woven into his political and religious career. - Jacket flap."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/12449790>
schema:genre"Church history"@en
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Archbishop William Laud"@en
schema:numberOfPages"272"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.