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Architectural diplomacy : Rome and Paris in the late Baroque

Author: Gil R Smith
Publisher: New York : Architectural History Foundation ; Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1676-77 a single event revitalized the traditions of Roman design. That event, the union of the French Royal Academy and the Academy of Saint Luke in Rome, is given new significance in the present study. It has long been thought that the academies' fusion signaled the passing of artistic preeminence from Rome to France. Here, however, the author proposes a more complex interpretation. By demonstrating that Rome  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Smith, Gil R., 1952-
Architectural diplomacy.
New York : Architectural History Foundation ; Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©1993
(OCoLC)622882256
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Gil R Smith
ISBN: 026219323X 9780262193238
OCLC Number: 25553180
Description: x, 367 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Contents: I. Aggregation of the Roman and French Academies: Union of Convenience Or Strategic Alliance? Architecture at the Academies to 1675. The Union of the Academies --
II. Concorso of 1677. The Task. The Competitors: Chupin, D'Aviler, Desgots. The Outcome --
III. The Interim Years: 1678 to 1692. The Fate of Relations Between Paris and Rome. Domenico Martinelli: Concorso of 1679. Filippo di Leti: Concorso of 1680. Romano Carapecchia: Concorso of 1681. Jan Reissner of Poland: Concorso of 1682. The Hiatus of 1683 to 1691. Filippo Barigioni: Concorso of 1692 --
IV. Concorsi of 1694 and 1696. Carlo Fontana and the Centenary of the Accademia. Competitions in the First Class: Pompeo Ferrari. Competitions in the Second and Third Classes: Alessandro Rossini and Ludovico Rusconi-Sassi. The Legacy of the Competitions --
V. Synthesis as Design Imperative at the Crossroads of the Late Baroque.
Responsibility: Gil R. Smith.

Abstract:

In 1676-77 a single event revitalized the traditions of Roman design. That event, the union of the French Royal Academy and the Academy of Saint Luke in Rome, is given new significance in the present study. It has long been thought that the academies' fusion signaled the passing of artistic preeminence from Rome to France. Here, however, the author proposes a more complex interpretation. By demonstrating that Rome continued, in fact, to be the more innovative and influential of the two academies, Gil Smith is able to discern patterns of influence that cross geographical and temporal boundaries, and to portray late-Baroque architecture in international terms. For this Compelling portrait of a transitional period of European architectural trends, Professor Smith draws on the student competitions inaugurated at the Saint Luke Academy to commemorate its ties with the French academies. Far more important than mere "academic" work, these competition drawings reveal the nature of instruction in Rome, the influences of the academy's officers and patrons, and the nature of contemporary projects similar in program to the competitions. The design synthesis pursued in Rome until the end of the seventeenth century, particularly by Carlo Fontana, would become an important source of inspiration for prominent architects of the next century. Among others, the academy's design methodology influenced Fischer von Erlach, Filippo Juvarra, and Giles Oppenord in their search for a progressive Baroque language.

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