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Are women human?

Author: Dorothy L Sayers
Publisher: Grand Rapids, Mich. : William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"One of the first women to graduate from Oxford University, Dorothy Sayers pursued her goals whether or not what she wanted to do was ordinarily understood to be "feminine.' Sayers did not devote a great deal of time to talking or writing about feminism, but she did explicitly address the issue of women's role in society in the two classic essays collected here."
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dorothy L Sayers
ISBN: 0802813844 9780802813848 0802829961 9780802829962
OCLC Number: 60420946
Notes: Originally published: 1971.
Credits: Dorothy L. Sayers; introduction by Mary McDermott Schideler.
Description: 69 pages ; 19 cm
Contents: Are women human? --
The human-not-quite-human.
Other Titles: Astute and witty essays on the role of women in society
Responsibility: Dorothy L. Sayers ; introduction by Mary McDermott Schideler.

Abstract:

Aiming to be true to her humanity, rather than her gender, the author believes that women should be treated as individuals, not a homogeneous class. These essays and witty arguments explore the role  Read more...

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The New York Times Book Review "Forthright and commonsensical. Christianity Today Offers pointed and witty arguments for treating women as individuals, not as a homogeneous class."

 
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