skip to content
The Arnolfini betrothal : medieval marriage and the enigma of Van Eyck's double portrait Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The Arnolfini betrothal : medieval marriage and the enigma of Van Eyck's double portrait

Author: Edwin Hall
Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, ©1994.
Series: California studies in the history of art., Discovery series ;, 3.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Commonly known as the "Arnolfi Wedding" or "Giovanni Arnolfi and His Bride," Jan van Eyck's double portrait in the National Gallery, London, painted in 1434, is probably the most widely recognized panel painting of the fifteenth century. One of the great masterpieces of early Flemish art, this enigmatic picture has also aroused intense speculation as to its precise meaning.
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Jan van Eyck; Jan van Eyck; Jan (1390-1441) Van Eyck; Arnolfini; Eyck, Jan van <1390-1440>; Jan van Eyck; Jan van Eyck
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Edwin Hall
ISBN: 0520212215 9780520212213 0520082516 9780520082519
OCLC Number: 28966994
Description: xxi, 180 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Contents: Introduction: Rehistoricizing the Portrait --
1. From Inventory Description to Symbolic Reading --
2. On Marriage Law and Ceremony --
3. Betrothal Custom and the Arnolfini Sponsalia --
4. Problems of Symbolic Interpretation --
Appendix: A Fifteenth-Century Florentine Marriage Service Before a Notary.
Series Title: California studies in the history of art., Discovery series ;, 3.
Responsibility: Edwin Hall.
More information:

Abstract:

Commonly known as the "Arnolfi Wedding" or "Giovanni Arnolfi and His Bride," Jan van Eyck's double portrait in the National Gallery, London, painted in 1434, is probably the most widely recognized panel painting of the fifteenth century. One of the great masterpieces of early Flemish art, this enigmatic picture has also aroused intense speculation as to its precise meaning.

Erwin Panofsky's view that the painting represents a clandestine marriage was almost universally accepted until recently, when scholars began to abandon his principle of "disguised symbolism" in favor of more theoretical approaches to the panel's interpretation. Edwin Hall's study - firmly grounded in Roman and canon law, theology, literature, and the social history of the period - reveals new meaning for this wonderful painting: instead of depicting the sacrament of marriage, Hall argues, Van Eyck's double portrait commemorates the alliance between two wealthy and important Italian mercantile families, a ceremonious betrothal that reflects the social conventions of the time.

Hall's illuminating book not only unlocks the mystery surrounding the content of this work of art; it also makes a unique contribution to the fascinating history of betrothal and marriage custom, ritual, and ceremony, tracing their evolution from the late Roman Empire thorough the fifteenth century and providing persuasive visual evidence for their development.

Since the fifteenth century, Jan van Eyck has been one of the most admired artists in the history of early northern painting. His pictures are jewels in themselves, crafted in luminous colors on wooden panels with a newly perfected oil technique, achieved by the application of transparent glazes over more opaque underlayers of pigment, permitting each detail to be rendered with astonishing verisimilitude.

The Arnolfini double portrait is Van Eyck's quintessential work and a striking example of how art and its meaning endure and engage us for centuries.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/28966994>
library:oclcnum"28966994"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/28966994>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1359313>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:name"Wedding portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and Jeanne Cenami (Eyck, Jan van)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1010603>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Marriage customs and rites, Medieval."@en
schema:name"Marriage customs and rites, Medieval"@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"1994"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1994"
schema:description"Introduction: Rehistoricizing the Portrait -- 1. From Inventory Description to Symbolic Reading -- 2. On Marriage Law and Ceremony -- 3. Betrothal Custom and the Arnolfini Sponsalia -- 4. Problems of Symbolic Interpretation -- Appendix: A Fifteenth-Century Florentine Marriage Service Before a Notary."@en
schema:description"Commonly known as the "Arnolfi Wedding" or "Giovanni Arnolfi and His Bride," Jan van Eyck's double portrait in the National Gallery, London, painted in 1434, is probably the most widely recognized panel painting of the fifteenth century. One of the great masterpieces of early Flemish art, this enigmatic picture has also aroused intense speculation as to its precise meaning."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/554978>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The Arnolfini betrothal : medieval marriage and the enigma of Van Eyck's double portrait"@en
schema:numberOfPages"180"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.