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The arrogance of the French : why they can't stand us, and why the feeling is mutual

Author: Richard Z Chesnoff
Publisher: New York : Sentinel, 2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Arrogance, snootiness, backstabbing, and disdain. To paraphrase de Gaulle, what else would you expect from a country with 246 varieties of cheese? The French have given American's a harder time on the international stage than anyone else. Driven by their own self-importance and their frustration at no longer being a superpower, the French talk down to us with galling self-righteousness. They love our movies and our  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Z Chesnoff
ISBN: 1595230106 9781595230102
OCLC Number: 57185537
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xvii, 187 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Contents: Sixty million Frenchmen can be wrong --
C'est logique --
A long legacy of love and hate --
Hinky, dinky, parlez-vous : France's War on Terror --
Not so nice in Nice --
Frère Jacques, dormez-vous? --
Some of my best friends--
--
Addenda. How to respond to rude French people ; French products : to buy or not to buy.
Responsibility: Richard Z. Chesnoff.
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Abstract:

Arrogance, snootiness, backstabbing, and disdain. To paraphrase de Gaulle, what else would you expect from a country with 246 varieties of cheese? The French have given American's a harder time on the international stage than anyone else. Driven by their own self-importance and their frustration at no longer being a superpower, the French talk down to us with galling self-righteousness. They love our movies and our fast food, but hate our values, our politics, and especially our president. And the feeling is mutual, particularly in the last few years (Would you like a side order of freedom fries, sir?) But as Richard Chesnoff points out in his delightful new book, the love/hate relationship between France and America didn't start with the election of George W. Bush, or even Ronald Reagan. It goes all the way back to the days of Benjamin Franklin and that uppity Rene Descartes. (Never trust a man named Rene.) Compared with Charles de Gaulle, Jacques Chirac is a piece of cake to work with. France's attitude has always been a problem, explains Chesnoff, who has lived in France most of the past twenty years while writing for major American magazines and newspapers. He explains how the French really think and what drives their jealousy and arrogance. His maddening experiences while living among the French will raise your blood pressure, make you laugh, and give you plenty of reasons to jeer. On a more serious note, Chesnoff reveals why French culture is in decline, why their economy's in dire straits, and how their hands became more than a little soiled from anti-Semitism and financial ties to the murderous regime of Saddam Hussein.

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