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Art objects : essays on ecstasy and effrontery

Author: Jeanette Winterson
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st American edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Jeanette Winterson argues in this collection for the importance of art in all our lives. In ten intertwined essays, the acclaimed author of such recent novels as Written on the Body and Art & Lies proposes art as an active force in the world - neither elitist nor remote, available to those who want it and affecting even those who don't.
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Jeanette Winterson; Virginia Woolf; Jeanette Winterson; Virginia Woolf
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jeanette Winterson
ISBN: 0679446443 9780679446446
OCLC Number: 32891334
Notes: Originally published: London : J. Cape, 1995.
Description: 192 pages ; 19 cm
Contents: pt. 1. Art objects --
pt. 2. Transformation: Writer, reader, words. Testimony against Gertrude Stein. A gift of wings (with reference to Orlando). A veil of words (with reference to The waves) --
pt. 3. Ecstasy and energy: The semiotics of sex. The psychometry of books. Imagination and reality. Art & life. A work of my own.
Responsibility: Jeanette Winterson.
More information:

Abstract:

Jeanette Winterson argues in this collection for the importance of art in all our lives. In ten intertwined essays, the acclaimed author of such recent novels as Written on the Body and Art & Lies proposes art as an active force in the world - neither elitist nor remote, available to those who want it and affecting even those who don't.

An act of courage and effrontery, a uniquely human endeavor that defies time and differences, art offers new realities, emotions and worlds to anyone prepared to meet the demands it places on us. Art objects to the lie that life is small, fragmented and mean. Art objects to the myth of inevitable decay. Winterson's eloquent vision of objecting, transforming, exuberant art is presented in pieces on painting, autobiography, style and the future of fiction. She also declares her admiration for Modernism and examines the writing of Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot and Gertrude Stein. More personally, she confronts the current fascination with the writer's life or sexuality instead of the work itself, and describes her relationship to her own fiction.

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